How to Become a Really Good Pain in the Ass: A Critical Thinker's Guide to Asking the Right Questions

How to Become a Really Good Pain in the Ass A Critical Thinker s Guide to Asking the Right Questions In this witty incisive guide to critical thinking the author provides you with the tools to allow you to question beliefs and assumptions held by those who claim to know what they re talking about Th

  • Title: How to Become a Really Good Pain in the Ass: A Critical Thinker's Guide to Asking the Right Questions
  • Author: Christopher diCarlo
  • ISBN: 9781616143978
  • Page: 349
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this witty, incisive guide to critical thinking the author provides you with the tools to allow you to question beliefs and assumptions held by those who claim to know what they re talking about These days there are many people whom we need to question politicians, lawyers, doctors, teachers, clergy members, bankers, car salesmen, and your boss This book will empowerIn this witty, incisive guide to critical thinking the author provides you with the tools to allow you to question beliefs and assumptions held by those who claim to know what they re talking about These days there are many people whom we need to question politicians, lawyers, doctors, teachers, clergy members, bankers, car salesmen, and your boss This book will empower you with the ability to spot faulty reasoning and, by asking the right sorts of questions, hold people accountable not only for what they believe but how they behave By using this book you ll learn to analyze your own thoughts, ideas, and beliefs, and why you act on them or don t This, in turn, will help you to understand why others might hold opposing views And the best way to change our own or others behavior or attitudes is to gain greater clarity about underlying motives and thought processes In a media driven world of talking heads, gurus, urban legends, and hype, learning to think clearly and critically, and helping others to do the same, is one of the most important things you can do.

    • Free Read [Business Book] ☆ How to Become a Really Good Pain in the Ass: A Critical Thinker's Guide to Asking the Right Questions - by Christopher diCarlo ó
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      Published :2018-08-16T08:48:50+00:00

    1 thought on “How to Become a Really Good Pain in the Ass: A Critical Thinker's Guide to Asking the Right Questions”

    1. There. Now it’s official. Rather than simply being accused of being a pain in the ass, I now have the requisite credentials to make it official. I feel emboldened now. Let the pain in the assing begin!To be fair, the pain in the ass I have heretofore assumed I was is not the same sort as the pain in the ass training offered here. Previously, my pain in the assdom was related to the aspects of my personality that chose to use words like “heretofore.” The ass-paining training introduced here [...]

    2. This book had three major problems for me.1) The tone. DiCarlo writes this as if he is speaking to a classroom full of students, which isn't really a bad this, but as I am not a student, the tone comes off as a bit condescending/patronizing. I do not believe this is intentional, but it was still off-putting.2) The graphics. 95% of the graphics in this book do not add anything to the text. They are there to show pictures. This would not be as much of an issue if DiCarlo did not refer to them in t [...]

    3. DiCarlo's work is really more like two books in one: Part One, How to Become a Really Good Pain in the Ass; Part Two, Let's Watch Christopher diCarlo Be a Really Good Pain in the Ass. Frankly, I found the former far superior to the latter (possibly because I like truth in advertising), full of loads of tips and tricks that I plan to practice on poor, unsuspecting people throughout the duration of the campaign season. The second half isn't bad, per se, just anticlimactic. Extra points given for w [...]

    4. Very much enjoyed this book. I'm not a philosophy major but appreciated all this book covered. It helps you understand where people are coming from and what they're influenced by. I didn't read this to learn to be a pain in the ass so much as to learn how to formulate a solid argument or position and this book covers that. I did find some of the topics a little hollow and overly lengthy but the author knew what he was trying to share so I'll just go with it.

    5. If your college Philosophy class was a three course meal this is a nice light snack. Quick, easy to read and to understand, but still pretty good. This contains probably the best description of the Socratic Method I've every read.

    6. Good roadmap to a way of thinking about your views of the world. It provides terminology, rationale and comparison for multiple views. A good starting point for a more formal entry into skepticism.

    7. This would be a really great book for teaching critical thinking to high schoolers. The writing is clear and easy to understand, and it covered the most basic and important aspects of critical thinking. It's systematically written, and it's very clear where diCarlo is taking you. However, the style of writing wasn't for me, as it seemed more like an essay for university than one with a compelling, interesting narrative. It was almost robotic at times, then he would throw in a pretty decent joke, [...]

    8. When I started this book I was unimpressed by the accompanying diagrams -- they seemed totally unnecessary. And the first part of the book is really a primer for those unacquainted with the tools of critical thinking but it is well written with a certain self-deprecating humor. The author frames the book in terms of the Five Big Questions that most humans attempt to answer in some form or another either through a natural or a supernatural approach. It is designed for anyone who would like to kno [...]

    9. This is an excellent and accessible introduction to formal logic as well as an interesting discussion on philosophy. The first section deals with formal argument, including different structures of arguments as well as many fallacies common in Logic. The book itself has a definite bias towards a naturalist alignment, but does well to make attempts to emphasize the suspension of judgement towards the supernaturalist points of view. In the third section of the book, diCarlo makes a strong argument [...]

    10. Probably more like a 3.5 stars rating would be appropriate. Sort of a textbook on critical thinking and skeptical thinking as a PROCESS, rather than how it is more often viewed in the world at large as "not believing in anything." Definitely worth reading. It made me wonder/marvel at the fact that kids in school are not taught the tools of rational, logical thinking. Why is that, anyway?One somewhat petty annoyance I found in the book was the inclusion of a lot of unnecessary or superfluous "ill [...]

    11. Υπέροχο βιβλίο!Μέσα αναλύονται όλα τα εργαλεία για να γίνει κάποιος a pain in the ass, ή για να το πω πιο light, ένας ορθολογιστής.Μέσα θα βρείτε μια αναφορά στον Σωκράτη και αρχαίους Sceptics (το θεωρώ αστείο που τόσα χρόνια στα σχολεία, έμαθα τι είχε κάνει αυτός ο Σωκράτης χάρη σε ένα άσχ [...]

    12. Canadian columnist, Christopher DiCarlo, in his first novel presents a rather humorous & yet interesting look at the process of critical thinking & how arguments are formed. Across 12 distinct chapters & over 300 pages, he takes a look at the unique characteristics of how biases are formed in arguments & also how to deconstruct things to find the truth within them. Each chapter builds upon successive themes whether they're in current terms or historical & the recaps of each c [...]

    13. I agree with the previously reviews and I couldn't have put it better. If you want to get good at arguing about religion, here's your bible, pun intended. If you want to be better at arguing in general, don't get your hopes up, but don't give away the book just yet.Liked: -Part 1 and 2 - I actually felt like I learned things about myself reading this. -I do like the casual tone of the author, but I agree, especially by the end of the book, it's condescending. That being said - quick, easy read f [...]

    14. I'd probably give this 3.5 stars. It's a very solid--and funny!--intro to logic and some philosophy ("intro" being the operative word there: if you've taken deductive logic or Philosophy 101, you probably won't get much more than a review out of this). Fun though it was, there were times where DiCarlo could have fleshed some things out a bit more and added some stronger arguments for and against the supernatural positions that he picks apart. Still, this is a fun, informative and quick read that [...]

    15. I'm a privileged-ass college graduate so this was a refresher course for me but if you're a free thinker who has ever wanted to cram a few years of psychology, philosophy, or sociology courses into a few hours this book is totally for you.Spoiler alert: it veers into the anti-superstitionalist towards the end. If that's not your bag I apologize but it is pretty difficult to be rational and religious at the same time so there's that.

    16. I'm obviously biased but I do believe it has more to offer than the usual/typical book on Critical Thinking. Focusing on the Big Five most important questions humans have asked themselves; and then to draw on the history of ancient skepticism as a precursor to scientific inquiry; and finally, to answer the Big Five questions in both natural and supernatural responses - demonstrates a focused fairness we don't often see today.

    17. Great book for learning how to be a critical thinker. The book explains some interesting steps in how to break down the arguments of others, dissect their ideas and reveal their bias, hypocrisy and inconsistencies.I do however would like to pose a warning to those who strongly believe in religion. This book focusses on arguing against religion. So if you don't like to be challenged or consider any questioning of "faith" blasphemous, stay away.

    18. This is really two books. The first half does a pretty good explaining how to understand, dissect, and challenge arguments. The second half is really an introduction to basic philosophy. First half pretty good. Second half not so much.

    19. Perfect introduction to philosophical pain in the assery. Includes review of ancient methods, basic logic, and five questions about life that have been answered with the supernatural - if you're an asshole.

    20. I'm pretty new to the science and philosophy behind critical thinking. This book provides a great overview of both before diving into some thoroughly enjoyable natural and supernatural answers to the authors big five philosophical questions.

    21. Pretty good, but covered a lot of ground I'm already familiar with. I was hoping for some new or novel ways of explaining the secular position on "the big questions," but I suppose there's only so much you can say about it.

    22. irritating metaphors and analogies, pointless pictures and diagrams, interesting content in the first half, not so much in the second half. meh.

    23. The title caught my eye, and I'm glad it did. An excellent book on critical thinking. Highly recommended.

    24. First section on the ABC's and DEF's of critical thinking should be required reading for ANYONE who hopes to convince anyone else of anything.

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