"The Tibetan Book of the Dead": A Biography

The Tibetan Book of the Dead A Biography The Tibetan Book of the Dead is the most famous Buddhist text in the West having sold than a million copies since it was first published in English in Carl Jung wrote a commentary on it Timothy

  • Title: "The Tibetan Book of the Dead": A Biography
  • Author: Donald S. Lopez Jr.
  • ISBN: 9780691134352
  • Page: 314
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Tibetan Book of the Dead is the most famous Buddhist text in the West, having sold than a million copies since it was first published in English in 1927 Carl Jung wrote a commentary on it, Timothy Leary redesigned it as a guidebook for an acid trip, and the Beatles quoted Leary s version in their song Tomorrow Never Knows More recently, the book has been adoptThe Tibetan Book of the Dead is the most famous Buddhist text in the West, having sold than a million copies since it was first published in English in 1927 Carl Jung wrote a commentary on it, Timothy Leary redesigned it as a guidebook for an acid trip, and the Beatles quoted Leary s version in their song Tomorrow Never Knows More recently, the book has been adopted by the hospice movement, enshrined by Penguin Classics, and made into an audiobook read by Richard Gere Yet, as acclaimed writer and scholar of Buddhism Donald Lopez writes, The Tibetan Book of the Dead is not really Tibetan, it is not really a book, and it is not really about death In this compelling introduction and short history, Lopez tells the strange story of how a relatively obscure and malleable collection of Buddhist texts of uncertain origin came to be so revered and so misunderstood in the West.The central character in this story is Walter Evans Wentz 1878 1965 , an eccentric scholar and spiritual seeker from Trenton, New Jersey, who, despite not knowing the Tibetan language and never visiting the country, crafted and named The Tibetan Book of the Dead In fact, Lopez argues, Evans Wentz s book is much American than Tibetan, owing a greater debt to Theosophy and Madame Blavatsky than to the lamas of the Land of Snows Indeed, Lopez suggests that the book s perennial appeal stems not only from its origins in magical and mysterious Tibet, but also from the way Evans Wentz translated the text into the language of a very American spirituality.

    The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying The Spiritual A newly revised and updated edition of the internationally bestselling spiritual classic, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, written by Sogyal Rinpoche, is the ultimate introduction to Tibetan Buddhist wisdom. The Tibetan Book Free Spiritual Ebooks THE TIBETAN BOOK OF LIVING AND DYING The pace of our lives is so hectic that the last thing we have time to think of is death We smother our secret fears of impermanence by surrounding ourselves with and goods, and things, and comforts, only to find ourselves their slaves. The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying The book explores the message of impermanence evolution, karma and rebirth the nature of mind and how to train the mind through meditation how to follow a spiritual path in this day and age the practice of compassion how to care for and show love to the dying, and spiritual practices for the moment of death. Bardo Thodol The Tibetan Book of the Dead Summum Foreword This book is the first English language translation of the famous Tibetan death text, The Great Liberation upon Hearing in the Intermediate State.Also known as the Bardo Thodol which means liberation by hearing on the after death plane Bardo after death plane, Thodol or Thotrol liberation by hearing , it was originally written in the Tibetan language and is meant to be a guide Seven Teachings from the Tibetan Book of Living and Dying The Tibetan Book of the Dead Or the After Death The Tibetan Book of the Dead is one of the texts that, according to legend, Padma Sambhava was compelled to hide during his visit to Tibet in the late th century The guru hid his books in stones, lakes, and pillars because the Tibetans of that day and age were somehow unprepared for their teachings. Tibetan Book of the Dead ReligionFacts Tibetan Book of the Dead Written by a Tibetan monk, the Book of the Dead describes in detail the stages of death from the Tibetan point of view It chronicles the experiences and religious opportunities a person encounters at various stages while dying, at the moment of death, during the day interval between death and rebirth, and at rebirth. The Tibetan Book of the Dead First Complete Translation Graced with opening words by His Holiness The Dalai Lama, the Penguin Deluxe Edition of The Tibetan Book of the Dead is immaculately rendered in an English both graceful and precise Translated with the close support of leading contemporary masters and hailed as a tremendo The first complete translation of a classic Buddhist text on the journey through living and dying. The Tibetan Book of the Dead Summary, Translation Translation of The Tibetan Book of the Dead In modern times, the first English translation, by Dr Walter Y Evans Wentz, was published in by Oxford University Press Dr Evans Wentz named the book The Tibetan Book of the Dead after the Egyptian book of the same name since he saw several parallels between the two.

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      314 Donald S. Lopez Jr.
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    1 thought on “"The Tibetan Book of the Dead": A Biography”

    1. Donald S. Lopez Jr. immediately hits the "Tibetan Book of the Dead" out of the gate as not properly speaking a book, not really Tibetan, and not really about death. Now, it must be clear, that the several different collections of terma texts that up the various editions of the Nyingma text, the Bardo Todol, are Tibetan, but it isn't one text and there isn't even a set collection. Instead, the "Tibetan Book of the Dead" is largely a creation of theosophist and semi-professional orientalist, Walte [...]

    2. This was a wonderful read, connected the dots between the Theosophists and The Tibetan Book of the Dead. Turns out The Tibetan Book of the Dead is not really Tibetan, not really a book, and not really about death. The central character, Evans-Wentz, was a spiritual seeker from New Jersey, didn't know the Tibetan language and never visited Tibet, though he crafted and named the book. He owed a greater debt to Theosophy and Madame Blavatsky. Remember that name from our class with Richard?This was [...]

    3. Most Westerners are introduced to Tibet through one of two means, often connected: either through the Dalai Lama and the Free Tibet movement, or The Tibetan Book of the Dead (and the Dalai Lama's Tibetan Buddhism). Lopez's criticism (especially after JUST reading it, and being excited to read a historical commentary on the book) is harsh. He calls out the treasure-revealers of Tibet (gter ston) comparing them to the well-known hack and serial liar and child-molestor Joseph Smith. Because, well, [...]

    4. It's not really Tibetan; it's not a "book" in any precise sense; and it's more concerned with rebirth than with death. To a large extent, the entity I encountered in the sixties under the title is the creation of Walter Evans-Wentz, an orientalist with deep interests in late 19th/early 20th century spiritualism, who more or less made it all up. That doesn't quite mean there's nothing to the philosophical/religious tradition that filtered through in such a bizarre form. There is a body of thought [...]

    5. I bought this little gem at the Asian Culture Museum in Singapore thinking it might provide insight about Buddhism (I was drawn to the many Buddhist sculptures and scriptures on display there). While it met that challenge in a very brief overview, it provided so much more. The author's succinct and artfully written "biography" of The Tibetan Book of the Dead reveals the many layers of interpretation inextricably entangled with these (select) religious texts. The ultimate lesson is one of being w [...]

    6. I loved this book. I have not read the Tibetan Book of the Dead; but, plan on reading it this fall. I was interested in getting a little background on it and this book delivered. It is written in a very clean prose making it easy to read and understand. It was surprising compelling as the author laid out the relationships between the various people who were instrumental in bringing the Tibetan Book of the Dead to the Western world and what motivated them. While Lopez is very opinionated about th [...]

    7. This book was a short, fast read full of lots of fun history concerning the texts known as the Tibetan Book of the Dead. It does hit on some key points of Tibetan Buddhism and history, but it also discusses certain beliefs and activities of late 19th/early 20th century occultists. Enlightening and enjoyable.

    8. I finished it and thought "hmm, interesting, but really, who cares?" It could have been done in 1/5 of the pages, without page after page after page of bewildering description of arcane and detailed rituals and beliefs from India and Tibet.

    9. Very interesting. Much different from the sort of book I thought it was. However, I like the information it presents.

    10. The Tibetan Book of the Dead is the most famous Buddhist text in the West, having sold more than a million copies since it was first published in English in 1927. Carl Jung wrote a commentary on it, Timothy Leary redesigned it as a guidebook for an acid trip, and the Beatles quoted Leary's version in their song "Tomorrow Never Knows." More recently, the book has been adopted by the hospice movement, enshrined by Penguin Classics, and made into an audiobook read by Richard Gere. Yet, as acclaimed [...]

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