Kublai Khan: The Mongol King Who Remade China

Kublai Khan The Mongol King Who Remade China In Xanadu did Kubla KhanA stately pleasure dome decreeKublai Khan lives on in the popular imagination thanks to these two lines of poetry by Coleridge But the true story behind this legend is even fan

  • Title: Kublai Khan: The Mongol King Who Remade China
  • Author: John Man
  • ISBN: 9780553817188
  • Page: 342
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Xanadu did Kubla KhanA stately pleasure dome decreeKublai Khan lives on in the popular imagination thanks to these two lines of poetry by Coleridge But the true story behind this legend is even fantastic than the poem would have us believe He inherited the second largest land empire in history from his grandfather, Genghis Khan He promptly set about extending thIn Xanadu did Kubla KhanA stately pleasure dome decreeKublai Khan lives on in the popular imagination thanks to these two lines of poetry by Coleridge But the true story behind this legend is even fantastic than the poem would have us believe He inherited the second largest land empire in history from his grandfather, Genghis Khan He promptly set about extending this into the biggest empire the world has ever seen, extending his rule from China to Iraq, from Siberia to Afghanistan His personal domain covered sixty percent of all Asia, and one fifth of the world s land area.The West first learnt of this great Khan through the reports of Marco Polo Kublai had not been born to rule, but had clawed his way to leadership, achieving power only in his 40s He had inherited Genghis Khan s great dream of world domination But unlike his grandfather he saw China and not Mongolia as the key to controlling power and turned Genghis unwieldy empire into a federation Using China s great wealth, coupled with his shrewd and subtle government, he created an empire that was the greatest since the fall of Rome, and shaped the modern world as we know it today He gave China its modern day borders and his legacy is that country s resurgence, and the superpower China of tomorrow.

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      Published :2018-09-20T17:21:09+00:00

    1 thought on “Kublai Khan: The Mongol King Who Remade China”

    1. Nicely paced biography of Kublai Khan, his exploits and challenges. Kublai expanded the Mongol empire, ended the Song dynasty, and put in place a bureucracy to rule his lands which span different cultures, religions and languages- no mean feat for one from a nomadic background.

    2. Brilliant, lively read, well structured - including the several necessary jumps through space and time that get you caught up with events across the Mongol Empire so that you can move on, fully informed, with the next bit of Kublai's life.In Chapter 12 John Man portrays Kublai Khan as the CEO of the Yuan Dynasty. The chapter opens:"Kublai had inherited astonishing managerial skills. He was no intellectual genius, but he had talents that made him one of the greatest CEOs of all time: he was a sup [...]

    3. Lama juga nunda2 baca biografi ini, yg sebenarnya cukup menarik untuk diikuti. Dan harusnya saya bisa selesai baca dalam 3-4 hari aja, kalo niat. Penulis buku ini, John Man, memang fokus dengan sejarah Mongol. Selain buku tentang Kubilai, dia juga menulis biografi tentang Jenghis Khan. Jenghis dan Kubilai adalah dua nama penguasa dari Mongol. Kubilai adalah cucu dari Jenghis, penerusnya yg memperluas wilayah kekuasaan Mongol hingga mencapai puncaknya. Well, keberhasilan utama Kubilai adalah mere [...]

    4. Very vivid and detailed history of the life and times of Kublai Khan, one of the world's greatest nation builders and founder of China's Yuan dynasty. Incidentally it is the legacy of Kublai Khan and the Yuan dynasty that forms the basis for China's territorial claims in Central Asia and Tibet. The books also deals with Marco Polo's travels to Yuan China and the time he spent in the company of Kublai Khan. John Man lucidly alludes to the controversies surrounding Marco Polo's travels and present [...]

    5. well-paced story telling that is captivating and very relate-able despite the subject matter occuring almost a millenium ago. very well researched book with clear explanations of how the empire building efforts of 2 men define modern geographical boundaries. however, due to the span of time and geography, the number of characters mentioned does become daunting and sometimes a little difficult to keep track of.

    6. I'm a history nerd and have a lot of patience for its drier parts. But let me tell you, this book surprised me with just how readable, exciting, and entertaining it was. John Man has taken a distant story and made it into an engrossing tale, not unlike Marco Polo, whom he mentions frequently. Punctuated with his personal anecdotes and explanations of how ancient history influences the modern world, it really is a "boring history book" worth reading.

    7. One begins to read this book about the famous historical persona from Mongolia, a land of mystery for most of the world and a land that much horrors emanated from for those that experienced the invasions and onslaughts, and the author assures us that the famous Kublai Khan and his much more famous grandfather Chengis Khan (Chingis Khan and Genghis Khan being alternative spellings) were not the murderous figures as they are normally understood but men of ability, thought, and more. And then he pr [...]

    8. The man is a gifted story teller, mixing up prose and history as if they're meant for each other. Clearly, Man has a bit of an advantage, re-using material he's researched for his two previous books on Chinggis and Attila but his imagery, style and pace are so infectious, it doesn't matter, reading practically the whole book with a smile on your face because every paragraph has boatloads of interesting information and many a few jokes. And then there are the many lovely footnotes of history Man [...]

    9. In Xanadu did Kubla Khan a stately pleasure dome decreeIn 1797, British poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge did a little reading on Kublai Khan, smoked some opium, passed out and had a vivid dream the Great Khan’s majestic palaces. He awoke with a 300 line poem already in his head, but was interrupted by his opium dealer, who’d arrived in the middle of the night and took an hour to complete their transaction. Thus, Coleridge forgot most of his poem, and was able to scrounge together a mere 54 lines [...]

    10. Someone very smart once said, winning a prize is one thing but keeping it is another. The latter part of winning - be it a kingdom, a title or just monopoly - is the area my heart truly yearns to learn about. That and about unsung heroes, the men and women who run the show from behind curtains. This would be a machiavellian's favorite bed time story book. These two ingredients, Mr. John Man serves you in large portions with his book on Kublai Khan. How the empire moved from Genghis to Ogedei to [...]

    11. This January I resolved I will read one fiction and one non-fiction simultaneously through the year. Then towards July middle, I started Kublai Khan by John Man and Mrs. Dalloway. Half way through both the books, suddenly started to long for children's books, fantasies and other lighter ones. And in between my favorite genre science fiction which is not light but still my favorite genre. So got into a light reading streak till October when I finally picked up and finished Mrs. Dalloway. Now done [...]

    12. A pretty good book, as others say, the informal tone is different. At first I didn’t like it but it grew on me, though at the slower parts of the book (maybe the 100 or so pages on the ruling of China in the book’s 2nd half) it got annoying again, though as the story got better (when things picked up with Vietnam and Japan), my tolerance for the little interruptions increased. Sort of funny that he calls out Marco Polo for doing the same thing. There are all these little blurbs about what hi [...]

    13. For one of my writing projects, I've recently done a lot of reading about roads. I realize now that what we think of as roads really had little sense in the past. Roads were tracks that people and animals followed, the major exceptions being the paths that armies took when they went war.The 200 years of Mongol influence shows this clearly. Mongol warriors travelled with at least five horses, and frequently their families. This meant that broads swaths of grasslands stretching across Eurasia were [...]

    14. Trying to replicate the success of Genghis Khan (the book) was always going to be tough. But here I think Man delivers yet again with his serious-yet-amusing narrative. Details were described vividly without overindulging in the specifics while painting what you would feel as was an accurate picture of the series of historical events that were crucial to understanding the life and times of Kublai. Again you are invited on his journey of discovery and quest to separate facts from myth. It's not j [...]

    15. A quick overview of Kublai Khan’s career although it is somewhat skimpy over the specifics in how exactly his mother supposedly engineered his acclamation as Khan. As the focus of the book is Kublai, the many campaigns mounted by the Mongols after he became Khan are covered with just sufficient detail to give an idea of what took place. For the average reader, there is a wealth of information here about the interclan strife among the Mongols who are also shown to have encountered severe limita [...]

    16. I recieved this book from a friend, a long with Wilbur Smith's novel about ancient Egypt. I though they might be somewhat similar in the storytelling. They aren't. This is a combination of a personal travel journey to Mongolia, historical facts, and fiction. Sometimes that might work. But this is not the case. It might be interesting in someway, but I'd prefer a history book about the subject instead.

    17. The bigger lesson learned from this book is that the children of exceptional people rarely become exceptional themselves. Perhaps the very drive that allows the parent to achieve unheralded greatness also prevents the parent from rearing his/her child with the tools (love, stability, etc) to repeat that success. Here Kublai Khan certain achieves a noted place in history, but not that of his father who, rather inadvertently, set off a blood feud between all his children.

    18. Love this book. Its most impressive how a Mongolian "barbarian" Kublai Khan (or rather his grandfather Genghis Khan) conquer the Pacific to urals, from Siberia to Afghanistan and all China. Bringing so many tribes, culture, religion into China.

    19. The author takes a "chatty" rather than academic approach to the subject, however I still found it to be an interesting and informative tale of events from the Mongol Empire.If you like historical narratives then I definitely recommend this.

    20. there is so much of interest here, and yet it is not written in an engrossing manner.Read to page 154 of 359.Family chart at front of book was almost useless.Picture insets were interesting.Figures didn't come alive. There was too much jumping around.

    21. About Kublai, the founder of Yuan dynasty. Interesting how an outsider to China helped form China the way it is. Author has done a lot research on this book. Interesting read.

    22. Biography on Genghis Khan's grandson who scaped China in the size and form and political frame we see it today. Fantastic read.

    23. A very well written book, nice exploration of the context of history - rather than just a narration of timeline!

    24. Excellent book. If you want to see that some cultures haven't changed over the past thousand years (think North Korea), read this book. It draws you in and you can't stop reading it

    25. This book honestly is very interesting; tells about how Kublai expanded Genghis empire further, told in a light story telling manner

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