The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind, Survive Everyday Parenting Struggles, and Help Your Family Thrive

The Whole Brain Child Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child s Developing Mind Survive Everyday Parenting Struggles and Help Your Family Thrive Your toddler throws a tantrum in the middle of a store Your preschooler refuses to get dressed Your fifth grader sulks on the bench instead of playing on the field Do children conspire to make their p

  • Title: The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind, Survive Everyday Parenting Struggles, and Help Your Family Thrive
  • Author: Daniel J. Siegel Tina Payne Bryson
  • ISBN: 9780553807912
  • Page: 406
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Your toddler throws a tantrum in the middle of a store Your preschooler refuses to get dressed Your fifth grader sulks on the bench instead of playing on the field Do children conspire to make their parents lives endlessly challenging No it s just their developing brain calling the shots In this pioneering, practical book, Daniel J Siegel, neuropsychiatrist and authoYour toddler throws a tantrum in the middle of a store Your preschooler refuses to get dressed Your fifth grader sulks on the bench instead of playing on the field Do children conspire to make their parents lives endlessly challenging No it s just their developing brain calling the shots In this pioneering, practical book, Daniel J Siegel, neuropsychiatrist and author of the bestselling Mindsight, and parenting expert Tina Payne Bryson demystify the meltdowns and aggravation, explaining the new science of how a child s brain is wired and how it matures The upstairs brain, which makes decisions and balances emotions, is under construction until the mid twenties And especially in young children, the right brain and its emotions tend to rule over the logic of the left brain No wonder kids can seem and feel so out of control By applying these discoveries to everyday parenting, you can turn any outburst, argument, or fear into a chance to integrate your child s brain and foster vital growth Raise calmer, happier children using twelve key strategies, including Name It to Tame It Corral raging right brain behavior through left brain storytelling, appealing to the left brain s affinity for words and reasoning to calm emotional storms and bodily tension Engage, Don t Enrage Keep your child thinking and listening, instead of purely reacting Move It or Lose It Use physical activities to shift your child s emotional state Let the Clouds of Emotion Roll By Guide your children when they are stuck on a negative emotion, and help them understand that feelings come and go SIFT Help children pay attention to the Sensations, Images, Feelings, and Thoughts within them so that they can make better decisions and be flexible Connect Through Conflict Use discord to encourage empathy and greater social success Complete with clear explanations, age appropriate strategies for dealing with day to day struggles, and illustrations that will help you explain these concepts to your child, The Whole Brain Child shows you how to cultivate healthy emotional and intellectual development so that your children can lead balanced, meaningful, and connected lives.

    • Free Read [Chick Lit Book] Â The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind, Survive Everyday Parenting Struggles, and Help Your Family Thrive - by Daniel J. Siegel Tina Payne Bryson ✓
      406 Daniel J. Siegel Tina Payne Bryson
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Chick Lit Book] Â The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind, Survive Everyday Parenting Struggles, and Help Your Family Thrive - by Daniel J. Siegel Tina Payne Bryson ✓
      Posted by:Daniel J. Siegel Tina Payne Bryson
      Published :2018-08-25T19:52:32+00:00

    1 thought on “The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind, Survive Everyday Parenting Struggles, and Help Your Family Thrive”

    1. Dan Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson’s “The Whole Brain Child” fails to deliver on the titular promise of “revolutionary” parenting strategies to “truly help your kids be happier, healthier, and more fully themselves”; it does, however, provide innovative and effective explanations, packaging, and delivery of many tried-and-true parenting techniques that turn out to be neuroscientifically based.The first four chapters are the love child of the Johns - Medina’s “Brain Rules for Baby [...]

    2. Interesting concepts, and I loved going through the brain and how it works based on our reactions; it brought me back to my psychology days. Although it was interesting to read and gave a few examples of how to implement the practices with children, I find that there is still a disconnect in how to apply it daily. I kept thinking to myself, "well that sounds good and I would love to do thatbut how?". I also noticed that they went a little far explaining each concept so that I felt like each para [...]

    3. I'd have given this book five stars if the writing were a bit more engaging; as it is, though the material is often fascinating and incredibly relevant (I've a 28-month old toddler at home!), I found the reading a bit of a slog at times.What Siegel has done here is, based upon cutting-edge neuro-science, boiled down the info relevant for parenting into 12 strategies to help you guide greater brain integration in your children, from birth through about 12-years old.The kinds of things we're talki [...]

    4. I am pleased to add this to my very, very small pile of approved discipline books.1) It fits in very nicely with our family's go-to discipline philosophy, Positive Discipline (as taught by Jane Nelson)2) It doesn't recommend punitive measures like time outs or spanking3) it's relatively fast and easy to read with some quick reference tips when you need them most4) it's fairly easy to implementonce you've made the paradigm shift, that is.5) it honors and respects children and reminds parents that [...]

    5. I've been reading about brain development in infants and children since my daughter was born 6 years ago. Understanding how the science of the brain interacts with the behavior of or the ability of a child to learn has led to my having more empathy for and understanding of my child. Many times we have expectations for our children that they can't meet, because their brains haven't been wired to do so yet. In addition, variations in parenting techniques work differently across the various age gro [...]

    6. I liked this book and appreciated the clear explanations of some brain science concepts (though I don't know whether it is all strictly accurate - for example, I keep hearing that the "left brain, right brain" thing is somewhat of a fiction). The book had a few really useful tools which I liked (for example, the wheel of awareness, and "move it or lose it"). It was well laid out, the cartoons and illustrations were helpful, and I really liked the "refrigerator sheets." As a parent and a therapis [...]

    7. This little parenting book is basically about how to teach children emotional intelligence--how to get them to recognize their own emotions, that emotions are temporary, and how to develop sympathy, among other things. Often when I interact with an upset child, I take the "dismiss and deny" strategy of telling them it's okay and that whatever they're upset about isn't that bad. Using this book's method, it's better to first acknowledge the child's emotion, like saying "you look sad! Is it becaus [...]

    8. I must say i am surprised to see so many good ratings. On the other hand it is the reason why I read it.First things first: I'm a dad with a 2 years old child and probably share every moms and dads usual issues and questions. By the way, we split everything that involves our child at home, meaning I do half of ALL.At first this book looked very promising. And then.I realised it has 2 sides.On the one hand, at the end of every chapter, there is a real life problem with the real life actions paren [...]

    9. If you are a parent, teacher or other person who works with children, I would commend this book to you. By understanding how the brain works, you can survive tough moments and teach children to thrive. The Whole-Brain Child explains both how and why. The twelve strategies the book explains are: Connect then Redirect Name It To Tame It Engage, Don't Enrage Use It Or Lose It Move It Or Lose It Use The Remote Of The Mind Remember To Remember Let The Clouds of Emotion Roll By SIFT: sensation, image, [...]

    10. I enjoyed this and tore through it pretty quickly. The only thing that annoyed me is the term "mindsight" It seems like there's already a term for what's being described: mindfulness. "Mindsight" sounds like a marketing term was being used where it wasn't necessary (maybe I'd feel differently had I also read Mindsight the book). Or maybe mindfulness isn't as common a term as I think and it helps people get the idea. Especially kids.Anyway, it seemed like there were good tips in here, for kids a [...]

    11. Easy to digest info on neuroplasticityoviding tools to help teach: 1)how to use both your logic and emotional sides of your brain more cohesively to make more balanced choices, and 2)how to get "unstuck" and be more flexible with your thoughts. Great for parents and teachers alike to help teach kids they can learn to influence their environment rather than be influenced BY it.

    12. It's not just a parenting book: most adults' mental health would benefit from reading this. The overall concept, explored in detail, is that humans are made up of many things and the better we can learn to make them work together, the better it will all work. I am fascinated in particular by how physical activity can change moods and how we can control our thoughts.

    13. I’ve been intrigued by a number of books recently that deal with brain development and emotional intelligence in children. This book, written by Daniel J. Siegel, M.D takes a look at the neurology of various emotional situations and strategies for dealing and developing emotionally intelligent children.As I write this post, I have not finished the book, but what I have enjoyed most so far is that it gives examples of “traditional” (authoritarian) parenting and strategies for managing situa [...]

    14. I felt disappointed in this book. Generally speaking, there weren't new ideas shared or new research. The book read like the authors were trying to explain neuroscience to a young audience or maybe an audience with no exposure to child development. The book focused on anecdotal stories to illustrate why a strategy worked but did not back up claims with research. The one thing I liked was that since the book was so simply written, it gave me ideas about how to explain some concepts about the brai [...]

    15. I really enjoyed this book. I'm looking forward to using these strategies with my own children especially after learning how I could be handling arguments and emotions in a better way. It's written well and includes many charts and illustrations. My favorite is the summary chart at the end to help you learn how to respond to different age groups. Glad to have read it

    16. The useful content of this book could be put on a post-card. 99.5% of the book, however, is full of stories bragging about how awesome the authors are. For those readers expecting neuroscience: Walk away. You'll be disappointed. The authors mostly ignore neuroscience, and when they do mention it, they talk down to readers as if we are toddlers as well.

    17. A fascinating read with good examples of how to transfer strategies to situations with your children. Some paragraphs are a slog to get through but on the while I got a lot out of this book, including many lightbulb moments!

    18. This is a great book that explains why children behave the way they do. I, personally, would recommend this to any parent.

    19. Read this! Far from long winded yet full of useful information and practical examples. I learned so much and will reference this book often I am sure.

    20. Anything that deals with brain development fascinates me. I will definitely be getting the paperback copy as a resource.

    21. Helpful and insightful (not earth-shattering, but clearly written) book in helping our children integrate various parts of the brain, and the different parts of our human entity: right brain + left brain, amygdala to prefrontal cortex, bodily sensations to cognitive thoughts. The book was practical with a lot of examples (sample dialogues) to help us navigate age-appropriate parenting in regards to empowering our children to activate and exercise all of themselves. Will refer back to it time to [...]

    22. I really enjoyed this book as it was steeped in good psychology (most of which I was unaware of before reading the book), it was well written and entertaining, it had great practical advice (especially the 12 numbered strategies), and especially that at the end the book was superbly summarized.As for a review, I will not write out the 12 strategies for one main reason: the refrigerator cheat sheet given at the end of the book. I absolutely loved this. After reading the whole book and meditating [...]

    23. I really enjoyed the "mindsight concept" (teaching children to calm themselves and focus their attention somewhere else rather than being fixated on one emotion/problem/issue) - I'll want to refer to that again as the kids get older.The "internal remote" concept (helping your kids narrate painful events with pauses, fast-forwards, and rewinds) is very useful, too. We've done this in our own way but the book gave me some more ideas for helping the kids talk about their experiences (upsetting or p [...]

    24. So many books about parenting report all sorts of research and don't provide practical examples of how to do it. This book provides you with clear cut techniques that really do work and are helpful. Additionally, they talk about how to use the techniques at different ages. It really is the only must read parenting book i've found. READ IT. Seriously. READ IT

    25. Very interesting techniques for encouraging empathy and emotional well being in children (and yourself!), I liked the little cartoons and how half of each child chapter was actual practical advice. Only negative was it was a bit dense with the science behind the brain connections, I skimmed quite a lot of those bits.

    26. Some good information here and there with good real-life examples, but incredibly bad writing, contrived metaphors and condescending tone make it really hard for me to recommend this book. It could have been a good 1000-word article, but as a book it is a waste of parents' precious time.

    27. Talk So Your Kids Will Listen is better and more comprehensive.I thought the neuroscience-y stuff was a bit forced and tiresome, especially the left/right brain chapter. The upstairs/downstairs section was an interesting metaphor - but only that.

    28. На початку літа я вже писала відгук на книжку, присвячену дослідженням людського мозку від «Нашого Формату» і зазначила, що такі видання допомагають не лише тим, хто виховує дітей, але й тим, хто прагне краще зрозуміти, як функціонує наш організм.Деніел Сіґел і Тіна Брайсон [...]

    29. "El cerebro del niño" plantea una serie de estrategias (con muchos ejemplos de aplicación, dicho sea de paso) para poder desarrollar la inteligencia emocional de nuestros hijos. Me ha gustado. Lo recomiendo mucho a todos los padres y también a las personas cuyo trabajo está relacionado a la crianza de los niños.

    30. Ever read a parenting book and thought to yourself, "I'm doing so many things wrong"? That happened to me when I read this. It was a GOOD thing. Everyone who has kids under 10 needs to read this book.

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