The Wand in the Word: Conversations with Writers of Fantasy

The Wand in the Word Conversations with Writers of Fantasy In a series of incisive interviews Leonard S Marcus engages thirteen master storytellers in spirited conversation about their life and work providing inspiring reading for fantasy fans and future wr

  • Title: The Wand in the Word: Conversations with Writers of Fantasy
  • Author: Leonard S. Marcus
  • ISBN: 9780763626259
  • Page: 212
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In a series of incisive interviews, Leonard S Marcus engages thirteen master storytellers in spirited conversation about their life and work, providing inspiring reading for fantasy fans and future writers alike.What kind of child were you When did you decide you wanted to be a writer Why do you write fantasy Fantasy, writes Leonard S Marcus, is storytelling with tIn a series of incisive interviews, Leonard S Marcus engages thirteen master storytellers in spirited conversation about their life and work, providing inspiring reading for fantasy fans and future writers alike.What kind of child were you When did you decide you wanted to be a writer Why do you write fantasy Fantasy, writes Leonard S Marcus, is storytelling with the beguiling power to transform the impossible into the imaginable and to reveal our own real world in a fresh and truth bearing light Few have harnessed this power with the artistry, verve, and imagination of the authors encountered in this compelling book How do they work their magic Finely nuanced and continually revealing, Leonard S Marcus s interviews range widely over questions of literary craft and moral vision, as he asks thirteen noted fantasy authors about their pivotal life experiences, their literary influences and work routines, and their core beliefs about the place of fantasy in literature and in our lives.

    • Best Download [Leonard S. Marcus] ↠ The Wand in the Word: Conversations with Writers of Fantasy || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF ✓
      212 Leonard S. Marcus
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Leonard S. Marcus] ↠ The Wand in the Word: Conversations with Writers of Fantasy || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Leonard S. Marcus
      Published :2018-08-20T06:25:13+00:00

    1 thought on “The Wand in the Word: Conversations with Writers of Fantasy”

    1. A series of interviews with thirteen of the 'big names' of fantasy. Mainly children's fantasy. Marcus starts each interview with 'What were you like as a child?' then tailors his next question, depending on the answer.I particularly liked the quote from Ursula Le Guin's The Tombs of Atuan. 'Knowing names,' said Sparrowhawk, 'is my job. My art. To weave the magic of a thing, you see, one must first find its true name out.'And Marcus' question: Are there ways in which writers of fantasy can get at [...]

    2. There's no great secrets here, but it's a charming look at the lives of many of the best children's fantasists of the twentieth century. I particularly appreciated hearing from Lloyd Alexander--whose personal life I've seldom seen discussed--and Brian Jacques, and any moments with LeGuin and Pratchett are worth cherishing. The questions could be repetitive, but whether it's the authors or Marcus's editing to thank, even answers to things as cliche as "What is your daily routine?" yield a variety [...]

    3. When I came across this at the library, I had to check it out, because all of the interviews are from my favorite fantasy authors. These people have had a huge impact on the genre, and have been inspirations to me both as a reader and a writer.The Wand in the Word provides a brief look into the writers' lives in a quick-to-understand format. I enjoyed the pictures of the authors when they were younger, and I loved learning about their first experiences with reading, storytelling and fantasy. For [...]

    4. This is a great book to learn from if you are a writer. Yes, it deals with writers of fantasy, particularly children's fantasy, but there are good ideas for character building and other aspects of writing that folks in any genre could put to use.

    5. Enjoyable light-hearted read. Stuff to while away a lazy afternoon. Does not give much insight into the authors' craft, though.Full review coming up soon.

    6. This is a wonderful collection of interviews with Fantasy some incredible Fantasy writers. I love the format, the questions, and the copy of an edited manuscript at the end of each chapter. It's also helpful to know that each writer has a process with similarities to mine-some don't write all day long; they may have a general idea of how a book will begin and end, but no clue about the middle; allow themselves to be spontaneous and take time to enjoy the craftOverall, a good, quick read.

    7. An excellent series of interviews with famous writers of fantasy. Most of the people interviewed are authors I'm familiar with, which is a nice change from a lot of interview books where half the authors are folks I've never heard of or haven't read. There are a lot of great anecdotes and insights in this little volume. I'm glad I stumbled across it!

    8. Review was originally posted on The Oaken Bookcase on June 18, 2012.The Wand in the Word consists of thirteen interviews with writers of Fantasy, including Lloyd Alexander, Franny Billingsley, Susan Cooper, Nancy Farmer, Brian Jacques, Diana Wynne Jones, Ursula K. Le Guin, Madeleine L’Engle, Garth Nix, Tamora Pierce, Terry Pratchett, Philip Pullman and Jane Yolen.The questions asked during each interview vary, but range from descriptions of childhood to what their typical writing schedule is l [...]

    9. Perhaps alphabetical order was not the best way to organize this anthology, simply because I found that the opening interviews of the collection were the least compelling. I would say "The Wand in the Word" is more of an interest read than a book through which to garner advice from fantasy authors. Though they certainly do advise in little tidbits, many of the questions asked were geared towards giving the reader a fuller picture of the authors as characters themselves; backstory, influences, wo [...]

    10. "The Wand in the Word" is an informative book that talks about some great writers of fantasy. Some of these authors include Jane Yolen, Brian Jacques, and Garth Nix. Readers feel as if the know the author better after reading this story. "The Wand in the Word" is written in a standard Q&A style asking questions such as "Did you enjoy writing as a child?". However, the reader also learns some facts about the authors unrelated to writing. For instance, Lloyd Alexander was revealed to have actu [...]

    11. I highly recommend this to anyone who wants to (or does!) write, especially if you're familiar with the authors. My favourite part was being able to compare the way they talk with the way they write, and being able to see how much of their writing voice comes up in their talking. Nancy Farmer, for example, just seems to breathe stories. Right from the first sentence, she's in storyteller mode, and it's really cool.Also, I love how Brian Jaques would sometimes say "meself". Words like that make m [...]

    12. I was at the library today on other business and spotted this book on a re-shelving table. I recognized several names of the interviewed authors and casually picked it up. Between a chair in the library and a sunny spot of lawn I breezed through it. There were some interesting insights into the writers' past and present lives-- kinda hard to see a sailor and truck driver as the man who ended up writing about heroic rodents (Brian Jacques). I haven't read many interview-type books for comparison, [...]

    13. I was at the library today on other business and spotted this book on a re-shelving table. I recognized several names of the interviewed authors and casually picked it up. Between a chair in the library and a sunny spot of lawn I breezed through it. There were some interesting insights into the writers' past and present lives-- kinda hard to see a sailor and truck driver as the man who ended up writing about heroic rodents (Brian Jacques). I haven't read many interview-type books for comparison, [...]

    14. Reviewed by Aubrey Hepburn for TeensReadTooEver wondered what it takes to be a writer or where writers get their ideas? THE WAND IN THE WORD answers these questions and more.The book is in question/answer format. Each author is introduced with a brief biography, and each section is closed with a reader - a list of books written by that author. I enjoyed reading each author's responses: war stories from Brian Jacques and Garth Nix, rejection tales by Tamora Pierce, Granny Aching character inspira [...]

    15. This is a collection of 13 interviews of fantasy authors, and I've read at least one book by 9 of them.The questions asked are about their influence by J.R.R. Tolkien, WWII, and their various upbringings. Many of them have met Tolkien and C.S. Lewis and/or seen them give lectures, of which I am very jealous. Each author submitted a picture of a page from an early draft of one of their works, edited and scribbled-on sheets of paper that show that these famous authors are as human as the rest of u [...]

    16. I loved this book; I picked it up at a convention in July and set it aside to read when I had a chance. Power outage in August provided me the opportunity - and at just the right time! As an aspiring author who beginning the process of querying agents for my own fantasy work, the advice of the masters heartened me greatly. The reminders to perservere, to ignore the naysayers, and to stay true to your art and what your heart tells you about your own work was just what I needed. I also LOVED seein [...]

    17. I picked this up before realizing it was directed at children. Most of the writers primarily write YA fantasy, and many of the questions focus on their childhoods. That's not necessarily a problem, but after you read "I was a quiet kid who read a lot and then started writing" seven times, you're kind of ready for a new line of questioning. Many of the questions were the same for every writer, which was a bit dull. There were interesting bits, and it was a nice introduction to a handful of writer [...]

    18. This book has interviews with numerous fantasy authors. All of them are well known, and I have read works from several of them. The interviewer was quite good at getting at the author's personality through the questions. Aspiring writers will find it especially interesting, because several of the questions asked had to do with their writing methods, for example: do you know how a book will end when you start writing it? I found these very interesting, but someone who doesn't aspire to be a write [...]

    19. This book is a series of interviews with a variety of established/ recognized fantasy authors. Brian Jacques (a mischievous old rascal, from the sound of it), Phillip Pullman (dour miserable fellow, also from the sound of it), Ursula LeGuine, Madeliene L'Engle, and a bunch of other authors answer questions about the influence of the World Wars, Tolkein's Lord of the Rings trilogy, and many other topics on their development as people and as writers. The overwhelming consensus amongst them seems t [...]

    20. In his interviews with these writers certain ideas are repeated: all of them have read Lord of the rings and cite it as an important influence, many grew up during World War ll and say it had a profound effect on their worlds, both real and fantasy and many of the writers had families that either did not support them as writers either through indifference or outright negative feedback. Another repeated theme is advice to young writers: don't rewrite what you've read. Use what you've read as a sp [...]

    21. A great book for those who want to be a fantasy writer. I loved reading what fantasy meant for each one. In a way, that allowed for the reader to listen to and think of what fantasy means to the world as well as what there writing means. There was so much insight into the lives of these authors, they were so varied and full of advice. With the different background of each writer, it lets the reader think of their background and, no matter where they come from, they can be great writers too, not [...]

    22. On Friday there was a package on my “desk” at work waiting for me. I love this part of the job. Inside was a book sent specifically for me with a note saying, “Hi Mandy, The first of many. Cheers”. And the book inside is what I have spent an entire delightfully thunderstormy day reading: The Wand in the Word: Conversations with Writers of Fantasy.I vaguely remember requesting a copy of this book a while back and love that it came unexpected and with the deliciously hopeful promise of man [...]

    23. If you are a writer (or want to become one) and a lover of fantasy, this book is for you. The Wand in the Word edited by Leonard S. Marcus is a collection of interviews and conversations with renowned authors of fantasies. They tell of their childhood, inspirations, and they're daily rituals and challenges. Though somewhat repetitive, their words are inspiring and have so much more behind them than just mere words. (Though one should perceive all literature in that way.)Though it is non-fiction [...]

    24. I picked this up in the library because it had interviews with authors that I enjoyed reading and a couple I hadn't got as far as reading yet. It's very enjoyable, the answers aren't always what you expect and some vary widely. It's interesting reading what they do believe in common, and a love of reading goes along very much with their writing. This is a combination I've always believed a neccessary one. Definitely a book I want my own copy of.The writers interviewed are: Lloyd Alexander, Frann [...]

    25. This book has conversations with some of the authors that I've loved almost since I started reading books that went beyond picture books. Actually, I think Lloyd Alexander wrote a picture book I read I've just looked him up and found out that he died in May of this year. How did I not know this? His books are ones that I carried around with me and read when I got bored in school. They invaded my dreams. They made me want to listen to music and travel. I have a letter from him, typed on a typewri [...]

    26. This is an interesting set of short interviews with 13 fantasy writers, most of whom I've read and enjoyed, aimed toward young people. Each writer was asked what they were like as a child and what they tell young people who want to write, along with more specific questions geared to the author. Many of the questions were about characters in their books and how they related to them, so it was a little confusing when I hadn't read the book, but it did give me some new books and authors to look for [...]

    27. This was a fun and interesting set of interviews with a variety of fantasy writers, ranging from Lloyd Alexander (of The Chronicles of Prydain series) to Ursula le Guin, Susan Cooper, and Terry Pratchett. Fun, and always fascinating to see how other writers work. I mostly got it because Lloyd Alexander is so rarely written about or even acknowledged in discussions of fantasy and yet his books were extraordinarily influential on my adolescence. So I always jump at the chance of reading more about [...]

    28. A brilliant collection of interviews with some of the best names in the children's fantasy writing business. My favorites were the interviews with Lloyd Alexander and Brian Jacques - unsurprisingly enough. All of them were worth reading however; even those with whom I violently disagreed with on various points (see Phillip Pullman's opinion on Lord of the Rings for one example) had other points worth pondering. A beautiful collection, one I will find myself returning to again and again for encou [...]

    29. This is a pretty great collection of interviews with popular children's/YA fantasy writers. Young readers are bound to find at least one interview with a favorite writer.Each interview is pretty cut-and-dry, with nearly identical questions each chapter. But it works.What I love best is that every writer insists that aspiring writers have to be readers first. Otherwise, the writing advice differed from author to author.Overall, 3/5 stars. The book wasn't amazingly inspiring to me now, as an adult [...]

    30. A good collection of brief original interviews of thirteen fantasy authors, each with a couple of photographs and a sample manuscript page showing the author's editorial process. Since I'd read ten of these authors, it made for an interesting read.However, talk about production values gone wrong! This book of only 200 pages was printed on very dense, high-quality paper with heavy board covers. Looked lovely, but painful to hold open one-handed! I literally couldn't get through more than a single [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *