Christian Materiality: An Essay on Religion in Late Medieval Europe

Christian Materiality An Essay on Religion in Late Medieval Europe In the period between and an increasing number of Christians in western Europe made pilgrimage to places where material objects among them paintings statues relics pieces of wood earth

  • Title: Christian Materiality: An Essay on Religion in Late Medieval Europe
  • Author: Caroline Walker Bynum
  • ISBN: 9781935408109
  • Page: 300
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In the period between 1150 and 1550, an increasing number of Christians in western Europe made pilgrimage to places where material objects among them paintings, statues, relics, pieces of wood, earth, stones, and Eucharistic wafers allegedly erupted into life through such activities as bleeding, weeping, and walking about Challenging Christians both to seek ever morIn the period between 1150 and 1550, an increasing number of Christians in western Europe made pilgrimage to places where material objects among them paintings, statues, relics, pieces of wood, earth, stones, and Eucharistic wafers allegedly erupted into life through such activities as bleeding, weeping, and walking about Challenging Christians both to seek ever frequent encounters with miraculous matter and to turn to an inward piety that rejected material objects of devotion, such phenomena were by the fifteenth century at the heart of religious practice and polemic In Christian Materiality, Caroline Walker Bynum describes the miracles themselves, discusses the problems they presented for both church authorities and the ordinary faithful, and probes the basic scientific and religious assumptions about matter that lay behind them She also analyzes the proliferation of religious art in the later Middle Ages and argues that it called attention to its materiality in sophisticated ways that explain both the animation of images and the hostility to them on the part of iconoclasts.Seeing the Christian culture of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries as a paradoxical affirmation of the glory and the threat of the natural world, Bynum s study suggests a new understanding of the background to the sixteenth century reformations, both Protestant and Catholic Moving beyond the cultural study of the body a field she helped to establish Bynum argues that Western attitudes toward body and person must be placed in the context of changing conceptions of matter itself Her study has broad theoretical implications, suggesting a new approach to the study of material culture and religious practice.

    • ☆ Christian Materiality: An Essay on Religion in Late Medieval Europe || µ PDF Read by ↠ Caroline Walker Bynum
      300 Caroline Walker Bynum
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      Posted by:Caroline Walker Bynum
      Published :2018-05-24T06:39:53+00:00

    1 thought on “Christian Materiality: An Essay on Religion in Late Medieval Europe”

    1. Walker's book is an interesting interrogation of Christian beliefs concerning matter, roughly from the period between 1300-1500. Walker notes how ambivalent were the attitudes of late medieval Christians in Northern Europe, who saw matter as something capable of conveying the divine, but also as something threatening, in the sense that it was characterized by decay and corruption. Even those who attacked images and statues, such as the Lollards, talked about those statues as if they were animate [...]

    2. Christian Materiality was originally a series of lectures given at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. I have to imagine that those lectures were quite different in form and phrasing to this book, because the text is dense and Bynum's argument subtle and complex. This is not a book to speed through—I had to pause and re-read parts several time to be sure that I was parsing what she was saying correctly, and of course I had to have a dictionary to hand. There were several times that I wished Bynum [...]

    3. There is no doubt that Bynum has some great ideas with evidence to back up. However, this book lacked a general message, by which I mean it had wonderful anecdotes and examples but no bigger message. I found myself reading it with great interest but whenever I closed the book I had no idea what I took out of it other than "oh there was one cool woodcut". The images were helpful as it provided a visual reference to the text, but overall it was a forgettable book.

    4. Tombs with statues of the deceased featuring bugs crawling out of their eyes and semi-exposed skeletons. Badges marking a successful pyramid shaped like genitalia. Women canonized as saints who saw visions of a dead baby being served on the altar at Mass. Yes, religion in the later Middle Ages got weird sometimes. At the top of her game and the apex of her career, a master of medieval religion explains why.

    5. This book is written from an Art History perspective rather than a Religious Studies perspective, which makes it more accessible those who are interested in religious art of Western Europe but don't have a lot of theory background.

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