Ellis Island Interviews: In Their Own Words

Ellis Island Interviews In Their Own Words The years hetween and saw the U S experience its greatest wave of immigration Between and than percent of immigrants to America came through Ellis Island The majority of Americ

  • Title: Ellis Island Interviews: In Their Own Words
  • Author: Peter Morton Coan
  • ISBN: 9780816034147
  • Page: 261
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The years hetween 1820 and 1931 saw the U.S experience its greatest wave of immigration Between 1892 and 1954, than 66 percent of immigrants to America came through Ellis Island The majority of Americans today are the descendants of pioneering ancestors from that period Here then are firsthand accounts by the last surviving immigrants and others of the hardships tThe years hetween 1820 and 1931 saw the U.S experience its greatest wave of immigration Between 1892 and 1954, than 66 percent of immigrants to America came through Ellis Island The majority of Americans today are the descendants of pioneering ancestors from that period Here then are firsthand accounts by the last surviving immigrants and others of the hardships they endured, experiences they recalled, and the wonder and amazement they felt seeing the Statue of Liberty upon their arrival at Ellis Island the proof that America, their dream, was real.

    Oral Histories The Statue of Liberty Ellis Island The Ellis Island Oral History interviews are available to researchers and interested members of the public in the Oral History Library, located on the third floor of Ellis Island Interviews In Their Own Words by Peter Ellis Island Interviews has ratings and reviews Sharon said This book is all about immigration to New York s Ellis Island It s an accumulation Ellis Island Interviews Ellis Island Interviews Immigrants Tell Their Stories In Their Own Words Peter Morton Coan on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Like the Statue of Interview with Ellis Paul and Vance Gilbert wjffradio You know people will laugh, not particularly because it is a funny line but they identify with the three women on the island Ellis I don t write Ellis Island Interviews From to , Ellis Island processed million immigrants Produced in cooperation with the Ellis Island Research Foundation, Ellis Island Interviews collects Ellis Island Interviews In Their Own Words Ellis Island Interviews In Their Own Words Peter M Coan Books Ellis Island Interviews alikarimi ellis island interviews Golden Resource Book DOC GUIDE ID bdb Golden Resource Book Ellis Island Interviews The Description Of Ellis Island Interviews

    • ↠ Ellis Island Interviews: In Their Own Words || ½ PDF Read by ò Peter Morton Coan
      261 Peter Morton Coan
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ Ellis Island Interviews: In Their Own Words || ½ PDF Read by ò Peter Morton Coan
      Posted by:Peter Morton Coan
      Published :2018-07-11T10:08:42+00:00

    1 thought on “Ellis Island Interviews: In Their Own Words”

    1. This book is all about immigration to New York's Ellis Island. It's an accumulation of stories as told by surviving immigrants, where they came from, how they lived in their countries, the journey to New York and what they enduring during the trip and what happened after arriving at Ellis Island. It's a wonderful book and it touches on an emotional level when they describe the sacrifices they made to come to America. It's a well written book which I thoroughly enjoyed. I highly recommend this bo [...]

    2. If I could give this 10 stars I would. was my all-time favorite book. As a genealogist I love to hear stories of my ancestors and this book gave me a real glimpse into the life of immigrants that came through Ellis Island. I like the way the book was divided by regions. I will be reading this again someday!

    3. This book is an amazing history of Ellis Island and the experience of those who worked there and those who entered "the golden door." This book would be appropriate for students in high school and beyond. It begins with a history of Ellis Island and then continues with a chapter filled with interviews of Ellis Island Employees. It was interesting to read of the immigrant experience through their eyes. The rest of the book is divided into geographic sections filled with personal interviews. If I [...]

    4. Ok, I'll be honest. I didn't read the whole book. Yet. It's deep. I read the beginning about the history of Ellis Island, how it got it's name, who owned it, and all about who worked there. The pictures are fascinating too. The sections are broken into nationalities which is very helpful. I read the accounts from Ireland and England immigrants and their lives are so amazing. They endured such hardships not only in obtaining passage, but also in eeking out a life in America.If I'm having a bad da [...]

    5. What a resource! These are narratives of emigrants from Europe telling their experiences as they entered the USA through the processing station of the 19th and early 20th century, Ellis Island. Thus, it is a large volume that is comprised solely of primary sources.This is not a light read; in fact, it might be better considered a resource material than a front-to-back read, though one enthusiastic enough could surely do it that way.

    6. What a sweet book. These are stories of people who came through Ellis Island and what they encountered on the way and once they arrived. Reading so many letters from 70 and 80 year olds who remember coming through in their childhood and teens almost makes me cry. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes history or a good old fashion "life" story.

    7. What a fascinating book. Peter Morton Coan has collected some great interviews with people who went through Ellis Island. The book is divided by region, and understandably he seems to have gotten the most material out of western and eastern Europe. It's unfortunate that he couldn't include some interviews with Asian immigrants also, but what is here is really good. I loved this book.

    8. Part fascination with that place, part research. But this book didn't dramatize nor glamorize Ellis Island so much as others may. It was very simply a collection of interviews with a broad range of people who had come through. And I will get there someday to see it-- I must.

    9. After visiting Ellis Island in person, I had to read more about the people who experienced it as they entered the country. This book was just what I was looking for - lots of first hand stories. Very engaging, sometimes heart-breaking and sometimes heart-warming.

    10. Organized by country of origin, this books gives testimony to the fate of emmigrants through Ellis Island.

    11. I loved the book. Very moving. The stories touch home since both my parents immigrated to America in the 20's and 30's.

    12. It's a really neat book. The author interviews dozens of first generation immigrants from all over the world and you get to read about each of their personal experiences on Ellis Island.

    13. This is one of my obsessions, and this book did not disappoint. A venture into non-fiction for a bit didn't hurt me. However, after a while, each story sounded much like the last one. I came away with a raw sense of the lives and countries these people left over a century ago, and the fortitude that made them move forward as Americans.

    14. This book purportedly included interviews from a variety of immigrant backgrounds. As I was interested in German, Polish and Austrian immigrants, I was disheartened to see that there were only two who possibly were of Christian backgrounds. This was out of 23 interviews. All the rest were Jewish. This is hardly a fair representation of Catholics and Protestants who came to America from these countries. There must have been thousands of non-Jewish immigrants from these three countries. Besides th [...]

    15. At least, I think I finished. I wanted to love this book, but it turns out to be quite the beast of a book. Interesting personal histories that give a pretty comprehensive view of immigrating to the US, but it just goes on and on and on. There are so many stories that are similar, so you begin to see patterns, but after a while, you begin to have trouble distinguishing the stories. I liked that it was divided into sections based on countries or regions because it helped to increase my understand [...]

    16. Have read through the sections about the Ellis Island Employees, the Southern Italy immigrants, the Northern Italy immigrants, and the English immigrants. I am half way through the Irish group and had to put my reading aside for company. I am really enjoying reading the accounts from each of the people that had been interviewed for this book. I like it! UPDATE: Finally finished this wonderful book! I recommend for anyone who thinks their life should be "better." We need to be thankful for what w [...]

    17. This is a serious of interviews of people who came to the United States through Ellis Island. Each interview is written just as the person told it so some include repetitive statements or items out of order. The interviews are divided in units by what part of the world the people came from. Since there is a common thread for the refugees leaving such a religious persecution, lack of jobs or the invasion of their country it becomes somewhat repetitive. I would recommend instead of reading it like [...]

    18. I'm a little bit stumped on how to rate this book. I didn't love it or hate it. While it did have some interesting parts, it was essentially too long and depressing for me to say it was good. The main character was a bit too dim to make her very interesting, and she kept saying (and saying and saying! ) essentially the same things over and over again, that she was beyond redemption, etc. Ugh!

    19. Ellis Island InterviewsThe history of Ellis Island, journals and commentary of several employees( 1892-1954) and a 7 part regional division with photographs and nation by nation(18 nations) personal stories of the immigrant experience.Each region is stand alone and the book can be leisurely read.I would have enjoyed more photographs of the actual functioning of Ellis

    20. Great documentation of important history with only one glaring error that I found. The edition I read had one story incorrectly classified as northern Italy but should have been southern Italy. Story of the woman from Potenza.

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