Noon

Noon Rehan Tabassum has grown up in a world of privilege in Delhi His mother is a self made lawyer and her new husband a wealthy industrialist But there is a marked absence in Rehan s life his father Sahi

  • Title: Noon
  • Author: Aatish Taseer
  • ISBN: 9780330540414
  • Page: 404
  • Format: Paperback
  • Rehan Tabassum has grown up in a world of privilege in Delhi His mother is a self made lawyer and her new husband a wealthy industrialist But there is a marked absence in Rehan s life his father, Sahil Tabassum, who remains a powerful shadow across the border in Pakistan This story follows Rehan s attempts to negotiate this loss Aatish Taseer was born in 1980 He is tRehan Tabassum has grown up in a world of privilege in Delhi His mother is a self made lawyer and her new husband a wealthy industrialist But there is a marked absence in Rehan s life his father, Sahil Tabassum, who remains a powerful shadow across the border in Pakistan This story follows Rehan s attempts to negotiate this loss Aatish Taseer was born in 1980 He is the author of Stranger to History a Son s Journey through Islamic Lands 2009 and The Temple Goers 2010 , which was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award He lives between London and Delhi.

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    • Unlimited [Contemporary Book] ↠ Noon - by Aatish Taseer ✓
      404 Aatish Taseer
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Contemporary Book] ↠ Noon - by Aatish Taseer ✓
      Posted by:Aatish Taseer
      Published :2018-09-05T00:53:12+00:00

    1 thought on “Noon”

    1. Loved the prose, but failed to make sense of the storyis is what I understood :post independence India and Pakistan of 70s and 80s. A young boy born out of a dysfunctional union between an Indian Sikh mother, Pakistani Muslim father, and who is influenced by Hindu idolatry is the main character. His lawyer mother remarried a rich Industrialist, similarly affluent father has married and divorced at Least a couple more times.The boy is in search of his identity, and is sort of keen to meet his bio [...]

    2. I hadn't read Taseer's Temple-Goers, but when I saw this book in the advance reading section of a bookshop, I couldn't help but snatch it up. I was truly disappointed. Perhaps my folly was attempting to read it while on a vacation in a tropical land, but I found the chapters disjointed and the protagonist extremely difficult to support. Was this his story, or his mother's new husband's? Was this a story about him finding his father who had abandoned him at an early age, because his father doesn' [...]

    3. It's a 2,5 actually. It reads like something I've read before - which I have. Taseer's autobiographical Stranger to History is really the base of this book too. The Indian mother, Pakistani father etc. And the morally corrupt modern India and Pakistan he writes about in Noon, while sounding true does not pull you in, the way it does in Adiga's White Tiger or Suketu Mehta's Maximum City or even a Mohsin Hamid's How to get filthy rich in rising Asia. What you sense is a distinct lack of empathy wi [...]

    4. I read a great review of this book when it first came out, so I was set up for disappointment. It's a quasi-autobiographical novel about a boy with a Pakistani father and Indian mother, and so there are two large parts to the book -- one in India and one in Pakistan. And they don't seem to have much to do with each other, and the boy doesn't really take his experience in one place to the other place. It reads like someone who's been told his life is really interesting and he should make it into [...]

    5. I really lost my way in this book but carried on because I had bought it! I struggled with the relevance of the three sections and being set in India and Pakistan I had high hopes for something better.

    6. A disappointing read. Glimpses of promise were quickly dashed away by an almost indifferent treatment of a tired and overdone subject.

    7. You write what you see, yet tell what you don't! This applies to Aatish Taseer's 'Noon' completely. In this book, he beautifully traces his journey from India to America to Pakistan as an audience as well as a participant. His journey from confused and insecure childhood to an adult searching identity and roots, from the corridors of ever changing power house Delhi to a volatile and extremist Port Bin Qasim, from a Hindu/ Sikh upbringing to the Muslim roots. There are gaps but they don't matter [...]

    8. This novel had a lot of material to work with, upper class society in India, upper class society in Pakistan, the differences and relations between the two, sexuality and homosexuality in Pakistan, the inner workings of a telecommunications conglomerate in Pakistan, etc. But it turned out to be just a tale of an overprivileged, entitled, lazy young man having an epiphany about his complicity in social ills, and about a spoiled man who suffers emotionally because of estrangement from his father. [...]

    9. Nicely written, with an easy flow that has me speeding through the book.What only have it two stars though, was the dividing of the book.When it opens we are on a train, and learn a bit about our main character who is on his way to meet his father for the first timeThen we have approximately half the book devoted to a theft in his home when he is a college studentre it told us about his attitude to the servants, but ultimately didn't go anywhere and for me didn't connect with the rest of the boo [...]

    10. solidly written but somehow flat and unimaginative (or uninspired). there was this level of snark and smugness that I did not enjoy for I couldn't see a purpose for it

    11. This was the second book that I picked up this year in 2018 and dang! it was good. It's subtle in its own way. Although I liked the cover of the book but the story of REHAN SAHAB was no where near to reflect in it. Book covers does say a lot about a story but in this one it didn't. It was nice to read about past. I liked how it was a smooth read. I completed this book in one day. How? well let's just say that I was excited to read it and that I was on a family trip to my aunt's house in Tariq ro [...]

    12. Weightless but not pointless. After following news of Salman Taseer's death fairly closely, I was surprised to see his son's byline in a passionate WSJ editorial criticizing Pakistan (onlinej/article/SB10001). It was the first I'd heard of Aatish Tasser, and I was impressed and intrigued. When Noon got a pretty lousy review in The New York Times, I lowered my opinion of Taseer slightly, but I had to revise it again after I saw him speak at a Granta event with Siddhartha Deb. Though his wealth an [...]

    13. Compelling storytelling This book is more a collection of short stories than a novel, showing as it does distinct episodes in the life of Rehan Tabassum set several years apart. Written sometimes in the first-person and sometimes in the third, we see Rehan first as a young man on his way to meet his father who abandoned his mother when Rehan was too young to remember him. The following four chapters focus on incidents in Rehan’s life from when he was a child until the present when he is a you [...]

    14. Absolutely riveting; I read it in two sittings [which is saying something because I'm usually lucky to finish a book at all, much less finish it quickly]. The premise isn't exactly compelling stuff to your average Westerner: Rehan Tabassum grows up in a changing India and later sees violence and extremism in a Pakistani port-city. However, it does give a Westerner a lot to contemplate, particularly towards the end.In Chapter 3 there's a robbery and Rehan narrates the tale of how discrimination p [...]

    15. It flits from one country to another and follows 4 disconnected incidents in Rehan Tabassum's charmed life - 2 in India and 2 in Pakistan. The India ones (One about little Rehan and his single Mom moving from their grandma's and the other about a grown up Rehan trying to work with Delhi authorities to get to the bottom of a household theft) are actually intriguing. The little Rehan one can't help but adore and sympathize with, the older, spineless Rehan in India one tends to despise but it still [...]

    16. Synopsis:Rehan Tabassum has grown up in a world of privilege in Delhi. His mother and her new husband embody the dazzling emergent India everyone is talking about. His real father, however, is a virtual stranger to him: a Pakistani Muslim who lives across the border and owns a vast telecommunications empire called Qasimic Call.As Rehan contemplates his future, he finds himself becoming unmoored. Leaving the familiarity of home for Pakistan in an attempt to get closer to his father, he is drawn i [...]

    17. Story at page 200 is totally crapOf, a tow cays later, a wedding massacre in Smv| hpictures wore awful: images of the young couple conn.vM,v}with scenes of butchery and chaos, the red and goM ^ ^Wedding lehnga stained with the deeper red ot brutal Mv\mBut once more, the motive for, in this case, tr.Urmdc wvmvstifving: the girl's brother and friends had turned on \\\ywedding party with axes upon discovering that not ,i vnv^Wmember of the groom's side could convert simple Urdu noutuinto their plur [...]

    18. When a book is endorsed by V.S. Naipul it raises high expectations, but I did not feel Noon was as unforgettable and compelling as I hoped it would be. The novel describes four episodes of the narrator’s life from 1989 to 2011. The first section portrays Rehan living with his squabbling mother and grandmother. The second is about a glamorous dinner party in honour of the Rajamata, who humiliates the host by arriving late. The wealthy nouveau riche plans his revenge years later. The third part [...]

    19. This was one of those books which showed a lot of promise, but overall was a little disappointing. Throughout much of the reading, I was kept interested but the book failed to live up to the hype and expectations.Aatish Taseer's description of the lives of Delhi's elite socialites brought back memories for me. I could personally associate with many of the characters described in that portion of the book. The section about the lives of the Delhi servants was also pretty captivating. However, what [...]

    20. Even though it claims to be a novel, the chapters in Noon are too disjointed to really read as one. Taseer's attempts at weaving together the narrative fall flat. I really did not enjoy the first two chapters that are set in India. Having read other works by Taseer in which he mines his personal life for material, they were repetitive and uninteresting. I especially did not like the chapter about his step-father's party because it was too reminiscent of 'Durbar,' written by Taseer's mother Talvi [...]

    21. Author quote: "in writing this last episode, I tried often to see what I had not seen, to be places I had not been, to pretend that my view of Port bin Qasim had not only-and ever- been an eclipsed one. In this, I was like a man, who peeping through a keyhole is denied his vantage point, when leaning too forcefully against the door that has restricted (and excited) his vision, he causes it to swing wide open. A mistake, you see: for what we cannot know is as much a part of us as what we do know. [...]

    22. I enjoyed this book. It doesn't follow a linear fashion, but explores different periods of time in the main character's life. I was able to pick this book up over a period of a few months, and keep reading wherever I had left off without any problem. I thought the story picked up in action/drama about halfway through. The Interesting juxtaposition between the Western world and Indian culture is examined in an offhanded way, but still remains a very interesting component of the book.

    23. Loved the detail, felt like I was right there! Very interesting story and Taseer did a wonderful job describing the scenes and characters. My only dislike of this book is the way the chapters flowed. They didn't seem to come together nicely but instead jumped around and confused me a little. Overall I would recommend this book. I'll be reading this one again!*I received the book for free through First Reads*

    24. Taseer is yet another subcontinent author with a brilliant writing style with flashes of descriptive brilliance escaping the dark depths of the land of No Plot But Too Much Disconnected Angst.Though the book is beautiful, I feel the Indian subcontinent needs more Hunter Thompsons and Bill Brysons, more Frank Millers and Garth Ennises, and less Stephanie Meyer.

    25. This book exemplified the split between the educated upper classes in India and Pakistan and the less well educated and working class. Corruption was a main theme as well.The story itself was a bit disjointed as it was told in chapters in different times and place but did get to the heart of the matter. I would have enjoyed more character development but am glad I read this.

    26. My first book by Aatish Taseer and I must say the experience has been really bad. The chapters in the book do not link each other, completely disjointed. It makes it all the more confusing not to mention an already boring narrative. I wouldn't recommend this book but of course it is my personal opinion. I had to force myself to finish this book.

    27. This may not be a book for everyone. But I would say that the story seems real. The parts do read as short stories where you could see the different stages of his life. Compelling enough that I wanted to read it all the way through though.

    28. This book too, seems autobiographical like A STRANGER TO HISTORY. But it wasn't as gripping or dramatic as expected. I felt quite disconnected from the story though there was so much material, so many topics and diverse characters to tackle.

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