Out of India: Selected Stories

Out of India Selected Stories Chosen by The New York Times Book Review as one of the best books of this volume of stories selected by the author from her own early work represents the essence of her Indian experience Beari

  • Title: Out of India: Selected Stories
  • Author: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
  • ISBN: 9781582430522
  • Page: 314
  • Format: Paperback
  • Chosen by The New York Times Book Review as one of the best books of 1986, this volume of stories, selected by the author from her own early work, represents the essence of her Indian experience Bearing Jhabvala s hallmark of balance, subtlety, wry humor, and beauty, these stories present characters that prove to be as vulnerable to the contradictions and oppressions of tChosen by The New York Times Book Review as one of the best books of 1986, this volume of stories, selected by the author from her own early work, represents the essence of her Indian experience Bearing Jhabvala s hallmark of balance, subtlety, wry humor, and beauty, these stories present characters that prove to be as vulnerable to the contradictions and oppressions of the human heart as to those of India itself.

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      Posted by:Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
      Published :2018-09-13T18:43:02+00:00

    1 thought on “Out of India: Selected Stories”

    1. I thoroughly enjoyed reading these 16 stories that Ruth Prawer Jhabvala (1927-2013) wrote between 1957 and 2000. All set in India and written from multiple points of view, these stories are made of the differences between rich and poor, between innocence and worldliness, between rural and urban lives, between Eastern and Western values - as well as contrasts in class and gender roles - all delivered in descriptive, matter-of-fact, often poetic prose that made me feel like I was hearing some firs [...]

    2. an evocative bunch of stories mainly about the ex-pat community in India, although some are from the point of view of Indian characters, rich and poor, guru and peasant. In the introduction the author states that the inescapable fact in India is poverty, something she never came to terms with, and this is reflected in some stories. There is a lot of unhappiness, boredom (or ennui) and some joy too

    3. I know Ruth Prawer Jhabvala through her fantastic screenplays: The Householder, The Europeans, Quartet The Bostonians, Heat and Dust, A Room with a View, Howards End, and The Remains of the Day. I felt that she was particularly suited to adapting the E.M. Forster novels because of her outsider status: a German Jew who fled to Britain during the war, moved to India with her husband, and then to the United States. As these stories (though fiction) reveal, she was in a constant state of outsider-ne [...]

    4. "What I am interested now is myself in India" writes Jhabvala in the introduction to this delightful collection of short stories. The stories paint an interesting portrait of Indian life and values from a Western perspective. When caste and tradition provide conflict, the author often deliberately draws her characters within certain moral lines. When Durga choses to shirk the traditional role of widow to live as she pleases, we feel resentment towards her self-serving family. To write Jhabvala o [...]

    5. Very good collection of stories, very poignant tales. Despite their diversity, they all seem to be about the same theme - the troubles of women, either middle or upper class Indian, or "Western," dealing with Indian men and culture.

    6. I rarely give such horrible ratings to a book, I always give even the most tragic story the benefit of the doubt, however I could not do such a thing for this collection of short stories. I believed that I would be reading a collection of stories about the wonders, the horrors, and the vibrant life that thrives and diminishes in India. I wanted culture and diversity. Instead, I was utterly revolted. Every single story, with the exemption of one, was about women being victims to horrible men. Tha [...]

    7. Through a series of short stories, the author provides a perspective of India through her version of the different types of people one might encounter there. I don't remember the book well, but I know I liked her writing style enough to pick this book up after reading Heat & Dust and then went on to read Travelers. Those who like movies like Remains of the Day, Howards End, and Room with a View will enjoy her work.

    8. I picked this up at the library because it was about India. I struggled with it. Perhaps I'm not intellectual enoughI pressed on, and was pleased that not ALL of the stories were tied somehow to sex but mostly I just wished these people were a little less ridiculous and that the stories spoke more to the version of India I experienced. (and yes, I did read the jacket blurb about the stories speaking to universal humanity; blah, blah, blah)

    9. great, well written short stories that show some views of what it was like (and maybe still is like) to live in India with all its many - sometimes contradictory - facets, layers and depths. This is not travel writing, but it could help someone traveling to India to begin to understand what they are going to be experiencing.

    10. I just finished this book last night around 1am. She is a very detailed author and it was well-written. I think her style of writing is what kept my attention more than the content. I picked this because it seemed like something I would not normally read. I will have to add her to my list of authors.

    11. read this many years ago!!! Didn't realize i had read this until i had read three stories and it started to dawn on me that it was familiar. Some of the sentences evoked the same reactions i had before and i recognized the same enjoyment. Then i realized i have also read Heat and DustI saved her obituary from the NYT and i am sure i still have it in my paper archives.

    12. This series of short stories, mostly with women who are unhappy in some aspect was moving and engrossing. Whether it was a white ex-patriot living abroad in India or a local widow choosing to live on her terms, each story was poignant and seemed to breathe on its own.

    13. I read Ruth Prawer Jhabvala sometime in the 90s after watching her interviewed by Paris Review at the 92nd street Y and fell in love with her voice and her sense of life—wry, bitter, her love of words. A total artist immersed in story.

    14. With quick-read short stories, this author tackles ideas of spirituality and how the search for happiness might be intertwined in it and in being female.

    15. This is a wonderful book of short stories about India from many different perspectives. It was gripping, sad, at times funny and ditsurbing. I am looking forward to reading more of her writing.

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