Parzival & Titurel

Parzival Titurel Written in the first decade of the thirteenth century Parzival is the greatest of the medieval Grail romances It tells of Parzival s growth from youthful folly to knighthood at the court of King Arth

  • Title: Parzival & Titurel
  • Author: Wolfram von Eschenbach Cyril Edwards Richard Barber
  • ISBN: 9780192806154
  • Page: 119
  • Format: Paperback
  • Written in the first decade of the thirteenth century, Parzival is the greatest of the medieval Grail romances It tells of Parzival s growth from youthful folly to knighthood at the court of King Arthur, and of his quest for the Holy Grail Exuberant and gothic in its telling, and profoundly moving, Parzival has inspired and influenced works as diverse as Wagner s ParsifaWritten in the first decade of the thirteenth century, Parzival is the greatest of the medieval Grail romances It tells of Parzival s growth from youthful folly to knighthood at the court of King Arthur, and of his quest for the Holy Grail Exuberant and gothic in its telling, and profoundly moving, Parzival has inspired and influenced works as diverse as Wagner s Parsifal and Lohengrin, Terry Gilliam s film The Fisher King, and Umberto Eco s Bandolino This fine translation, the first English version for over 25 years, conveys the power of this complex, wide ranging medieval masterpiece The introduction places Eschenbach s work in the wider context of the development of the Arthurian romance and of the Grail legend This edition also includes an index to proper names and a genealogical table, and is the first to combine Parzival with the fragments of Titurel.

    • ✓ Parzival & Titurel || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Wolfram von Eschenbach Cyril Edwards Richard Barber
      119 Wolfram von Eschenbach Cyril Edwards Richard Barber
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Parzival & Titurel || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Wolfram von Eschenbach Cyril Edwards Richard Barber
      Posted by:Wolfram von Eschenbach Cyril Edwards Richard Barber
      Published :2018-05-12T19:12:43+00:00

    1 thought on “Parzival & Titurel”

    1. I haven't the least doubt that attempting to render medieval German verse in modern prose is extremely difficult, but still, this is a laughably horrible attempt. At the very least, a translation should be readable, and this version of Parzival is so stilted, awkward, and full of howlers that it is torment to read. The translator seems to have made every effort to represent every single word of Parzival in modern English, regardless of any sort of consideration of flow and readability. For examp [...]

    2. A good book, if slightly confusing. Chivalric romance tends to be confusing anyway, as the authors (or, sometimes, copyists) try to shoehorn in everything they know. Names come thick and fast, characters die in their first outings, and it can be a bit much. Narrative consistency not being an issue for writers in that period, there is an awful lot of 'oh, and by the way, although I didn't tell you this before, this is true' as they strive to close a narrative loop. Also, the amount of sex mention [...]

    3. Wolfram's narrating persona endears itself through a Malory-like enthusiasm about both secular chivalry and the mysteries of the grail, both in the beginning part (not in Chretien) regarding Parzival's father and his first marriage, and throughout the crib from Chretien. When he picks up afterwards, though he starts out strong with some good railing against God from Parzival, we then get just a really long fight between Parzival and his heathen brother, some talk about pronouns, and, most dumb, [...]

    4. I honestly don't know what to make of this. Somehow everything I understood in Chrétien, refracted through Wolfram, became confusing: why does Parzival disappear for almost the entire narrative? What's Gawain's point? Why the proliferation and names? What accounts for this paratactic aesthetic? I know it'd be fun to teach the authorial intrusions, and I'm sure the German is itself unbearably dense, probably the sort of thing that'd reward a life's attention. But lord knows I'll never put this o [...]

    5. A fascinating and infuriating book at the same time. A 'best seller' in the 12th century, it gives a good insight into the ways of thinking of the literate classes at the time. This is a long text, so not for the fainthearted and it can see repetitive at times. But it raises a lot of interesting issues, that I wouldn't have even considered, such as issues around racial tolerance. Although of uneven pace where the pace picks up there are some great section. This one is for those who want to study [...]

    6. Charming and wild, and I love epic poetry anyway. Started reading to prepare for going to Wagner's opera, but nothing can prepare one for that!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *