Emporium

Emporium Step through the door and discover Big Bumperton on his bicycle Mrs Beltinska in her bath Monsieur P on holiday a transfixed girl in blue jeans two lascivious figs and a god who wanders shopping

  • Title: Emporium
  • Author: Ian Pindar
  • ISBN: 9781847770653
  • Page: 344
  • Format: Paperback
  • Step through the door and discover Big Bumperton on his bicycle, Mrs Beltinska in her bath, Monsieur P on holiday, a transfixed girl in blue jeans, two lascivious figs, and a god who wanders shopping arcades Drawing on avant garde and traditional influences, this collection of poetry maps a surreal hinterland where the dark humor of absurdity lies in wait At times comiStep through the door and discover Big Bumperton on his bicycle, Mrs Beltinska in her bath, Monsieur P on holiday, a transfixed girl in blue jeans, two lascivious figs, and a god who wanders shopping arcades Drawing on avant garde and traditional influences, this collection of poetry maps a surreal hinterland where the dark humor of absurdity lies in wait At times comic, political, satirical, and erotic, this compilation is stocked with curiosities, jokes, and horrors.

    • Best Download [Ian Pindar] ☆ Emporium || [Self Help Book] PDF ☆
      344 Ian Pindar
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Ian Pindar] ☆ Emporium || [Self Help Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Ian Pindar
      Published :2018-08-10T15:08:59+00:00

    1 thought on “Emporium”

    1. Emporium is an enjoyable collection of poetry. I’ve never read any of Ian Pinder’s work before (not to my knowledge anyway). This was a good introduction to a new poet. I didn’t love the poems but I really enjoyed some of them. The poems that stood out the most for me are Figure Study, On the French Riviera, Society of Blood, Advise for Travellers and Snow. Pinder’s poems are very typical of much contemporary poetry, they contain lots of imagery, sometimes this can be vague or obscure wh [...]

    2. Ian Pindar's debut collection lives up to its name in two ways. Firstly, it's a shop-front for a weird and wonderful variety of wares, as the poet tests out different forms and voices and offers them up for your consumption. Secondly, it's about cost and commerce, and marks Ian Pindar out as a poet of the recession, comparable in mood, sensibility and technical control to the great poets of the 1930s: Louis MacNeice, Stephen Spender, W H Auden, Cecil Day-Lewis. There are echoes of T S Eliot too, [...]

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