St. Ives: Being The Adventures of a French Prisoner in England

St Ives Being The Adventures of a French Prisoner in England From the creator of Treasure Island and Kidnapped and written while he lived in Samoa this was the author s last title Stevenson had written all but the very conclusion of this work at the time of h

  • Title: St. Ives: Being The Adventures of a French Prisoner in England
  • Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
  • ISBN: 9781426411014
  • Page: 290
  • Format: Paperback
  • From the creator of Treasure Island and Kidnapped, and written while he lived in Samoa, this was the author s last title Stevenson had written all but the very conclusion of this work at the time of his death His stepdaughter had been serving as his secretary and was in possession of an outline for the ending In order to conclude the story the publisher enlisted the talFrom the creator of Treasure Island and Kidnapped, and written while he lived in Samoa, this was the author s last title Stevenson had written all but the very conclusion of this work at the time of his death His stepdaughter had been serving as his secretary and was in possession of an outline for the ending In order to conclude the story the publisher enlisted the talents of Sir Arthur Quiller Couch who supplied the last few chapters.

    • Free Read [History Book] ↠ St. Ives: Being The Adventures of a French Prisoner in England - by Robert Louis Stevenson ✓
      290 Robert Louis Stevenson
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [History Book] ↠ St. Ives: Being The Adventures of a French Prisoner in England - by Robert Louis Stevenson ✓
      Posted by:Robert Louis Stevenson
      Published :2019-01-05T14:39:43+00:00

    1 thought on “St. Ives: Being The Adventures of a French Prisoner in England”

    1. Re-read. (I know I read this at least once before, as I read my whole gorgeous set of RLS books that were once owned by my maternal grandfather). Despite that, didn't have much memory of this book at all. It is ADORABLE! Such a fun sense of humor. In my aforementioned gorgeous set (dated 1897, Charles Scribner's Sons) there is the following editorial note: "The following tale was taken down from Mr. Stevenson's dictation by his step-daughter and amanuensis, Mrs. Strong, at intervals between Janu [...]

    2. This is another of Stevenson's epic adventure stories that follows a French soldier as he is taken capture after enrolling in Napoleon's army under a pseudonym. The story follows his adventures with the army, his time as a prisoner and his travels around Britain following his release. It is written with Stevenson's typical skill at story telling and his sense of adventure. A fabulously traditional adventure story.

    3. I would call it a 19th century bathtub book (def: book suitable for reading in the bathtub). Writing is lovely, characterizations are disarming, storyline is farfetched. Its near-fatal drawback: RLS died before finishing it and the publisher gave it to Mr. Quiller-Couch to wrap up based on Stevenson's notes. Unfortunately, he turned a charming treat into a boring slog.

    4. My mom gave me this book for Christmas, and it sat on my shelf for six months because it didn't look interesting. Finally forced myself to pick it upd it's beautiful. Not one of his deepest stories perhaps, but very sweet and touching. I loved it.

    5. Another rollicking tale of adventure from RLS, St. Ives himself is one of the most likable of any of his protagonists, but sadly this book (or at least my version) lacks an ending.

    6. I've always maintained a coldly mechanical willingness to stop reading a book whenever the time comes… St. Ives, the time comes at Chapter XXXI.Stevenson died after writing XXX chapters of St. Ives, and a respected contemporary, Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch, wrote the remaining VI chapters from Stevenson's notes.Stevenson's oeuvre is fastidiously lush, precise, sophisticated, with deeply contextual character development and dialogue that leaves me breathless with anticipation for more. Ther [...]

    7. About the Author Robert Louis Stevenson was born in 1850 in Edinburgh, the son of an engineer. He briefly studied engineering, then law, and contributed to university magazines while a student. Despite life-long poor health, he was an enthusiastic traveller, writing about European travels in the late 1870s and marrying in America in 1879. He contributed to various periodicals, writing first essays and later fiction. His first novel was Treasure Island in 1883, intended for his stepson, who colla [...]

    8. Aaaaagh! The ending was missing! The story, though rather linear, was entertaining and written with RLS' usual style and wit. Set in the early 1800s, the story is told from a first person perspective, following St Yves the French prisoner's journey up and down the length of England. Compared to Treasure Island, St Ives is a little pedestrian and hardly jam-packed with derring-do, but I liked it better for that. [I have since read the ending by Arthur Quiller-Couch, who does a quite marvellous jo [...]

    9. I read a digital version of this novel. Imagine my joy when I got to the end and read "At this point the Author's manuscript breaks off." The end. I guess I should have done more research before reading this. Apparently it was completed by someone else after Stevenson's deathif I had known this I would have read the completed version. So, I'll review what was written by Stevenson. I rate the novel as three stars.I felt there was a lot missing and too much dedicated to the travels between points [...]

    10. I read a Kindle edition I got from Project Gutenberg and do not know if this is the same editiong. Mine did not include the extra chapters written by Quiller-Couch, so the story ended abruptly.Having just seen the movie St. Ives, I was surprised by how much and how quickly the book proved to be different from the film. The movie was fun -- a light-hearted Napoleonic romance -- and some of that is in Stevenson's unfinished novel. But I confess I do not know where he thought he was going with his [...]

    11. It's been a while since I have read a Robert Louis Stevenson book, but I think this was below average for him. The plot is, of course, some adventurous romp, in which the hero is always in danger. Several of the hero's escapes are just nonsense, though, as are some of the situations that he needs to escape. I found reading this tedious after a while.

    12. French Nopoleonic Prisoner of War escapes from Edinburgh Castle, down the rock face to claim his inheritance

    13. Too much love, not enough adventure makes this less believable and less fun than most Stevenson novels. The abrupt ending is also a bummer.

    14. Name of Viscomte de St Yves, French Napoleonic prisoner of war escapes from Edinburgh Castle - down the rock face to claim his inheritance. Adventure and humour. Excellent

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