London: The Novel

London The Novel London presents the sweeping saga of one of the greatest cities on earth from the days of the Romans through two thousand years of history as seen through the eyes of generations of the same six famil

  • Title: London: The Novel
  • Author: Edward Rutherfurd
  • ISBN: 9780449002636
  • Page: 225
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • London presents the sweeping saga of one of the greatest cities on earth from the days of the Romans through two thousand years of history as seen through the eyes of generations of the same six families London is both a unique narrative exploration of the city s development from humble trading post to the hub of a mighty empire, and the very human story of the men anLondon presents the sweeping saga of one of the greatest cities on earth from the days of the Romans through two thousand years of history as seen through the eyes of generations of the same six families London is both a unique narrative exploration of the city s development from humble trading post to the hub of a mighty empire, and the very human story of the men and women who made it great Through the compelling lives and adventures of memorable characters Julius, the small time Roman coin forger, risking his life to find buried treasure Dame Barnikel, who runs the tavern where Chaucer and his pilgrims carouse Geoffrey Ducket, the founder of a dynasty whose members one day become peers of England Edmund Meredith and the actors in Shakespeare s Globe Theatre and little Lucy, living by Dickens s muddy Thames we watch London grow from its first beginnings and become part of the wonderful pageant that flows on still today.

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      Posted by:Edward Rutherfurd
      Published :2018-08-12T00:37:02+00:00

    1 thought on “London: The Novel”

    1. A sprawling historical novel as big as London itself - it was required reading before I went to study abroad and I've read it twice since. Rutherford did an incredible amount of research and it all comes together beautifully. The characters' family trees carry through the entire history of Britain - pre-Roman through WWII. This book is so dear to my heart!

    2. The third book of Rutherford's that I've read of this type. Have previously read Sarum and Russka and this book pretty much followed those; nothing really surprising or extraordinary about this book.I suggest reading this book for more of the historical facts than any sort of story-telling. As a history of London (and England) it's nice in that it's not too dry and involves a little bit of fictional aspects. However, the fact that the characters change every couple of chapters (as the narrative [...]

    3. I did not like this book, and probably won't finish it though I'm 3/4 of the way through. The author goes from life to life through the history of London, and because it's such massive history, is unable to give details about the characters and environments that I usually adore. Because of this lack of detail I feel disconnected from the characters and the story. I chose to read it after going to London and wishing I could learn more about the historical day to day. I think reading seperate book [...]

    4. UPDATE: An author certainly can't cover every historical event concerning London in a single volume, or perhaps even in a series of volumes. However, to me. Rutherford completely skips over a vital part of London's history, a cultural one that had a worldwide impact perhaps as much of an impact as other issues. Before laughing out loud, here me out: the world is still reeling from the impact of London's "Swinging 60's": things such as fashion, the sexual revolution, music, films, class, etc. Whe [...]

    5. London stretches all the way from Roman times to the present. The author tells stories at the most dramatic moments of that city's history, leaping from Caesar's invasion to the Norman Conquest to the Great Fire to the Blitz, with many stops in between. London is ambitious, and students of English history will eat it up. I really enjoyed this one.

    6. This epic work really does bring history alive in your as Rutherford moves from chapter to chapter effortlessly tracing the history of the remarkable city London and 5 remarkable families .There is not a dull moment and this should really awaken any interest you may have in historyIncredible men and unforgettable ,often extremely sensual, women enliven the pages of this work as you gain more knowledge about England and in the last chapter the message of the book is described succinctly .The rich [...]

    7. Ugh. Every physical description of a female character began and ended with her breasts. Wooden prose, stilted dialogue -- actually, the only thing I enjoyed about this book were the descriptions of London as it grew and changed. If Rutherfurd had written a story about the city itself, rather than bringing characters into it, I might have enjoyed it more. Maybe a better writer will attempt that book.

    8. It's odd to read a 1,124 page novel and feel that it's too short. This is not a "haute" literature novel, but rather a sprawling ramble through the history of London - the terrain and its people - made accessible through a series of chronological tales told through the ages. As with "Sarum," Mr. Rutherfurd follows different families over the centuries, with their stories intertwining due to coincidence, marriage, and friendship. This book genre is terrific for learning little known facts, such a [...]

    9. If you happen to like hauling around 1000+ page books with you for weeks, you'll love this one! Although not in the same league as Ken Follett's "Pillars of the Earth" and "World Without End", this is a nice book for Follett fans who are suffering from severe withdrawal symptoms after finishing those two great novels. I probably could have done without the first 200 pages, I really didn't need to know how the White Cliffs of Dover were formed to lead into the rest of the book, but once I got pas [...]

    10. It started out fine, but about 3/4ths of the way through, the repetition (particularly every era having a character with an odd streak of white hair) got to be annoying, and in a 1100+ page book, it ended up seeming interminable.Rutherfurd's got a schtick of writing massive doorstoppers following one family over the course of millennia. There's intimate domestic dramas and high points in history all mixed together. A fine formula, but once is enough. I tried reading his Russka: The Novel of Russ [...]

    11. This is a long book--I will be a few days on this one. Looks good so far.************Tuesday 1/6/09. Now on page 365 of London. Still good. Will review when finished.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Finally finished London (we have been a bit busier at work).The historical details of this book are excellent. I know a bit out history and there were no obvious errors or jarring anachronisms. [...]

    12. Edward Rutherford writes mammoth books where the central character is a place and the people in them are incidental and used to drive the plot across a given time period (usually several thousand years). It is a formula that has worked well and gained critical and popular acclaim. ‘London’ is the third such novel of his I have read; the other two are ‘Sarum’ and ‘The Forest’.‘London’ contains all of the best and worst elements of those two books. In ‘Sarum’ the characters and [...]

    13. With over eleven hundred pages, I was anticipating London to be both entertaining and educational. I was hoping for that magical merging of history and fiction, which gives life to history and historical significance to life. Rutherfurd's book, however, misses this anticipation by a wide margin.London covers almost two thousand years of history and focuses on a few familial hereditary lines throughout that span of time. Each period of history that is selected by Rutherfurd is complemented by sto [...]

    14. I'll admit it--I didn't finish it. It's a good idea, and a good introduction to London's history, but I really got a little tired of the story (over and over and over) of the Brave, Heroic, Intelligent Man who manages to seduce, conquer, and commit adultery with the Silly, Stupid, Manipulative Woman, who is brainless, yes, but prettier than all the other silly, stupid, and manipulative women in that particular chapter. In fact, I have a hard time remembering a chapter in which this does not happ [...]

    15. He dudado mucho acerca de la nota que debería ponerle a esta novela, ya que aunque muchas partes se me hicieron super interesantes otras me aburrieron bastante y se me hicieron muy pesadas Pero como creo que lo segundo era culpa mía por estar un poco verde con la historia de Inglaterra, el libro se nota currado y muy bien documentado, y la última parte la he disfrutado muchísimo y eso hace que me haya quedado buen sabor de boca Creo que se merece las 4 estrellas."Londres" es un paseo de más [...]

    16. Enjoyed this thoroughly though I concede it is popular rather than literary fiction. I haven't read other Rutherford books but I understand the concept is similar -- follow a few families, with distinguishing physical and personality traits, down through the ages from nigh pre-historic all the way through to contemporary world (the 1990's in this case), weaving history in with (fictional) biography. There is a quite an array of characters, and although some of them are stock or have elements of [...]

    17. I read this as a crash course in London history before studying abroad in the old English city. While I do feel much more familiar with the city's (and England's) basic history, the book didn't have as much merit as literature. There are a few things I want to specifically address:-Character development is lacking, which makes sense because the book takes place over thousands of years. As others have said, the main character is London itself, but the individuals in the book were often flat and/o [...]

    18. So this book.I read Edward Rutherfurd's novel "Paris" at the beginning of this year and flew through the 800-something pages because I just couldn't put it down. Yes, part of it is my bias because I love that city, but the book was such a great work of historical fiction in itself. It has a place on my favorites list and I recommend it to all.With that, I bought "London", assuming I'd love it just as much. I'm totally into England and English history, especially Tudor history, so I was really ex [...]

    19. Edward Rutherfurd belongs to the James Michener school: he writes big, sprawling history-by- the-pound. His novel, London, stretches two millennia all the way from Roman times to the present. The author places his vignettes at the most dramatic moments of that city's history, leaping from Caesar's invasion to the Norman Conquest to the Great Fire to (of course) the Blitz, with many stops in between. London is ambitious, and students of English history will eat it up. The author doesn't skimp on [...]

    20. Hot summer days between the move and the arrival of household goods - no better time to start a long epic by Rutherfurd. I discovered this book was loaned to me about ten years ago by someone who doesn't want it back. I love these Michener-like authors who start with the creation of the earth and bring it through the centuries to modern day time, especially when, like Rutherfurd, they have families who intertwine through the epochs and are followed from earliest times to the present.I also love [...]

    21. 2.5 stars.So in 2018 I have decided that I will be doing my own version of a Tome Topple challenge, where every month I will aim to read a book that's ~600 page plus in length. To kick things off, I've decided to pick up Rutherfurd's 'London', after having enjoyed two of his previous works. Unfortunately, not so much here.Look, I love the way that Rutherford makes everything interconnected within families, and it's fascinating to watch the city change and develop. However, I didn't really connec [...]

    22. Well, for an 1100 page-plus book, I would've liked it to be more interesting. There were a lot of large sections that were bogged down by politics & religion (and at one regrettable point, banking); while I know these issues obviously affect people's lives, I don't need to read about every single complexity therein.There were some great historical tidbits I'd never heard before and I went Googling several times to look at photos & drawings of places gone by (several still remaining). The [...]

    23. London: The Novel is an entertaining, albeit long, read. It takes some time to get into the book; you have to make your way past some dry geographic passages and slow character development. Each chapter is its own short story which could probably stand on its own. Since the author couldn’t use the same character through two millennia, he has simplified the character development by using several families and their descendents. Different genetic traits and/or attitudes reoccur through the ages [...]

    24. You either love or loathe this book. I loved it! We were lucky enough to have a friend in London lend us his apartment for a month while he was overseas working. And that was our honeymoon - a month in London. In the years that followed, we returned many times to explore the city we loved. This book brought things to life that we'd seen many times and had no clue as to why they were like that. It's the biography of a huge city made personal by the very human characters. There are so many parts t [...]

    25. This was a lonnnnnnnnnnnng book! It traces the history of London, from Roman times up through the 1990s. The author cleverly establishes several families and follows them throughout the various historical periods of London's history. It was a fascinating book, and I learned a great deal about the city, the history of British royalty, the origins of buildings and businesses in London and also the origins of many archaic says we still use today. I enjoyed the book, but it was a little too long for [...]

    26. I had to refer back to the family tree in the beginning of the book a lot because I kept getting confused about which family the character I was reading about belonged to but on the whole I enjoyed it. Some of the descriptions of London were lost on me since I have never been there but I did learn something and I enjoyed googling some of the famous buildings and seeing what they really looked like. I concluded in the end that if I wanted to get really familiar with London I'd have to visit and r [...]

    27. Fantástico. Definitivamente leeré nuevamente a Rutherfurd. Lo mejor son las descripciones de lugares y edificios, y las tecnologías usadas en la construcción (mi lado arquitectónico sale a flote aquí).

    28. I've read Russka and Sarum from this same author, and I was not disappointed. I'm a huge history buff, even more so with novels of this type that span different generations/eras. To me, this subgenre of historical fiction can really make history come alive as you see what changes through the ages. We move from near the start of the Common Era, all the way through the 20th century and explore various strata of the social and economic classes in England through the times.There is a bit of overlap [...]

    29. I've attempted this book twice and both times I couldn't get any more than 200 pages into it. I just didn't find any of the characters that interesting or the multiple storylines any more riveting. I am a little disappointed because I loved "Paris" so much and I had such high expectations for this one since it's one of his first novels

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