House of Mourning: A Biocultural History of the Mountain Meadows Massacre

House of Mourning A Biocultural History of the Mountain Meadows Massacre On September some men women and children from the Arkansas hills were murdered in the remote desert valley of Mountain Meadows Utah This notorious massacre was in fact a mass execut

  • Title: House of Mourning: A Biocultural History of the Mountain Meadows Massacre
  • Author: Shannon A. Novak
  • ISBN: 9780874809190
  • Page: 259
  • Format: Hardcover
  • On September 11, 1857, some 120 men, women, and children from the Arkansas hills were murdered in the remote desert valley of Mountain Meadows, Utah This notorious massacre was, in fact, a mass execution having surrendered their weapons, the victims were bludgeoned to death or shot at point blank range The perpetrators were local Mormon militiamen whose motives have beeOn September 11, 1857, some 120 men, women, and children from the Arkansas hills were murdered in the remote desert valley of Mountain Meadows, Utah This notorious massacre was, in fact, a mass execution having surrendered their weapons, the victims were bludgeoned to death or shot at point blank range The perpetrators were local Mormon militiamen whose motives have been fiercely debated for 150 years.In House of Mourning, Shannon A Novak goes beyond the question of motive to the question of loss Who were the victims at Mountain Meadows How had they settled and raised their families in the American South, and why were they moving west once again What were they hoping to find or make for themselves at the end of the trail By integrating archival records and oral histories with the first analysis of skeletal remains from the massacre site, Novak offers a detailed and sensitive portrait of the victims as individuals, family members, cultural beings, and living bodies.The history of the massacre has often been treated as a morality tale whose chief purpose was to vilify or to glorify some collective body Resisting this tendency to oversimplify the past, Novak explores Mountain Meadows as a busy and dangerous intersection of cultural and material forces in antebellum America House of Mourning is a bold experiment in a new kind of history, the biocultural analysis of complex events Winner of the Society for Historical Archaeology James Deetz Book Award.

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      Posted by:Shannon A. Novak
      Published :2019-01-10T22:15:03+00:00

    1 thought on “House of Mourning: A Biocultural History of the Mountain Meadows Massacre”

    1. My advisor's first book details the history and bioarchaeology of the Mountain Meadows massacre, which was a slaughter of a group of families travelling west in the 1800s by Mormons in Utah. I read and helped proofread the book in manuscript form; I'll be buying my copy as soon as it is available!

    2. I enjoyed this book but wanted it to be so much more than it was. The author is a forensic anthropologist who examined the bones (in 1999) of some of the victims of the MMM when their remains were inadvertantly disinterred during the excavation for a new monument. I realize she was only able to give the bones a quick and cursory examination. And I find it remarkable that so much information can be determined simply by a few bones. But I still feel like her book is incomplete somehow. When I fini [...]

    3. A captivating and first-rate interdisciplinary study of the Mountain Meadows massacre that happened in Utah in 1857.Shannon Novak bases her study in part on familiar documentary sources, but she also presents the results of her own examination of some of the victims' skeletal remains. (Novak is a biological anthropologist working at Syracuse University.) Unlike previous authors, who have emphasized the events of the crime, Novak chooses to describe the lives of the murdered settlers; much of her [...]

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