No Treason: The Constitution of No Authority

No Treason The Constitution of No Authority What is the motive to the secret ballot This and only this Like other confederates in crime those who use it are not friends but enemies and they are afraid to be known and to have their individua

  • Title: No Treason: The Constitution of No Authority
  • Author: Lysander Spooner
  • ISBN: 9781419137198
  • Page: 459
  • Format: Paperback
  • What is the motive to the secret ballot This, and only this Like other confederates in crime, those who use it are not friends, but enemies and they are afraid to be known, and to have their individual doings known, even to each other They can contrive to bring about a sufficient understanding to enable them to act in concert against other persons but beyond this theyWhat is the motive to the secret ballot This, and only this Like other confederates in crime, those who use it are not friends, but enemies and they are afraid to be known, and to have their individual doings known, even to each other They can contrive to bring about a sufficient understanding to enable them to act in concert against other persons but beyond this they have no confidence, and no friendship, among themselves.

    Lysander Spooner No Treason No The Constitution of NT The first and second numbers of this series were published in For reasons not necessary to be explained, the sixth is now published in advance of the third, fourth, and fifth NO TREASON No VI THE CONSTITUTION OF NO AUTHORITY. Lysander Spooner No Treason No The Constitution NO TREASON No II The Constitution I NT The Constitution says We, the people of the United States, in order to form a perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of Treason In law, treason is the crime that covers some of the extreme acts against one s nation or sovereign Historically, treason also covered the murder of specific social superiors, such as the murder of a husband by his wife or that of a master by his servant. No, Edward Snowden probably didn t commit treason The Dec , Jefferson Davis stole a bunch of states and waged war on the other ones for four years, and even he wasn t convicted of treason U.S Senate Historical Office Paul Ryan No, I don t think Trump committed treason Even for , that headline is pretty If you had asked Never Trumpers in to forecast a headline they d expect to read two years later, Paul Ryan No, I don t think Trump committed treason yesterday onstage with Putin would be near the top of the list. High treason in the United Kingdom Under the law of the United Kingdom, high treason is the crime of disloyalty to the Crown.Offences constituting high treason include plotting the murder of the sovereign committing adultery with the sovereign s consort, with the sovereign s eldest unmarried daughter, or with the wife of the heir to the throne levying war against the sovereign and adhering to the sovereign s enemies, giving High Treason No Harrison Edward Livingstone High Treason No Harrison Edward Livingstone on FREE shipping on qualifying offers This book s nine weeks on the New York Times bestseller list reflects the public s need to know the facts of the assassination of JFK The author s new evidence and astute analysis point toward a conspiracy to kill JFK Article III Constitution US Law LII Legal Section .The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish The judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, and shall, at stated times, receive for their services, a compensation, which shall not be diminished during their History Rohwer Heritage Site Background War hysteria, racial prejudice, and failure of political leadership led to the forced removal of , Japanese Americans from the West Coast following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Five myths about treason The Washington Post Carlton F.W Larson is a professor of law at the University of California at Davis and is writing a book about treason and the American Revolution.

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    1 thought on “No Treason: The Constitution of No Authority”

    1. Long before the the Civil War started, Lysander Spooner was a strong abolitionist and was extremely active in supporting efforts to free the slaves. Despite this, when war broke out, he strongly opposed it. Spooner contended that the Civil War was less about freeing the slaves than it was about maintaining the union. For him, keeping the South in the union meant violently forcing a large group of people (the Southerners) to be subjected by a government to which they no longer consented. No Treas [...]

    2. I once saw Lysander Spooner’s “No Treason” described as the most subversive thing ever written in the United States. Whoever thought this obviously missed the point that Spooner was trying to make when he wrote “No Treason”. The word subversive means that one is advocating the overthrow of a legally constituted government. The whole premise of “No Treason” is that the United State is not a legally constituted government because people can only be governed by consent and no one cons [...]

    3. As much as I'd love this to be a sound critique of the state, I cannot overlook the weaknesses of this lengthy self-absorbed rant.First of all, much if not most of Spooner's argument rests on the belief that every contract needs to be physically signed in full form by publicly disclosed parties in order to be valid. This extremely legalist approach is simply not applicable to the real world. Think of a restaurant - I do not sign anything when I dine in one and I usually do not even disclose my n [...]

    4. Spooner, writing in 1867, heavily criticizes the constitution. While we would hope today that our government would try to live within the restrictions of the constitution, the government of his day had used that document as a justification for slaughtering hundreds of thousands of people.It is especially an interesting read for Mormons. For he logically proves that our government is a secret combination of murderers and thieves.It is a short read, available as a free mp3, and very provocative.

    5. Spooner cuts through the religion of constitution-worship like no other. He holds no punches, even to the point where he openly advocates defensive violence against agents of the State.He is perhaps the first Libertarian to use the "against me" argument. (What do you advocate being done to me if I don't want to participate in your organization?)Great essay. Must read of any Libertarian, or anyone who has an iota of faith in the US Constitution.

    6. A short thought provoking work which will definitely get your brain thinking.Even though this was written during the civil war era, Spooner lays out a clear argument in this work of literature that will definitely have you questioning authority. It's very entertaining and easy to read; and it will certainly be something that I will read multiple times. Highly recommended.

    7. I generally consider myself a Minarcho-capitalist agrarian. I'm not sure that I'm ready to don the mantle of anarchism quite yet, but after reading these essays by Lysander Spooner, I no longer feel justified in my support of minimal government.

    8. Refutes the common fallacy of accepting constitutional government, which has no basis in any sound legal tradition.

    9. "The fact is that the government, like a highwayman, says to a man: “Your money, or your life.” And many, if not most, taxes are paid under the compulsion of that threat.The government does not, indeed, waylay a man in a lonely place, spring upon him from the roadside, and, holding a pistol to his head, proceed to rifle his pockets. But the robbery is none the less a robbery on that account; and it is far more dastardly and shameful.The highwayman takes solely upon himself the responsibility [...]

    10. This short work is a welcome stimulant toward critical thinking in political philosophy beyond the veil of constitutionalism, and to the heart of the issue: under what authority does the American government operate at all? If this subject interests you, I recommend beginning with The Law by Bastiat, and then tackling this piece. But Spooner can nonetheless stand on his own, and he is not difficult to understand.Also, I see his oft-reviled repetitions (pedantry?) as a stylistic by-product of the [...]

    11. "No one, by voting, can be said to pledge himself for any longer period than that for which he votes. If, for example, I vote for an officer who is to hold his office for only a year, I cannot be said to have thereby pledged myself to support the government beyond that term." 12"In truth, in the case of individuals, their actual voting is not to be taken as proof of consent, even for the time being. On the contrary, it is said to be considered that, without his consent having ever been asked a m [...]

    12. The beginning of this starts out as a warning. "This essay may contradict some of your basic ideas about the world - even if you are a most advanced Thinker, Libertarian, or Anarchist." It didn't and fuck you don't tell me how to feel! REEEEI thought some of these conclusions were valid and well thought out. Part 17 about fraudulent debts is 100% accurate but even then I was thinking this doesn't go far enough but then again this was written in the mid 1800's so how much could he really know abo [...]

    13. This little book is an essay broken up into 3 parts which are legitimacy of the constitution, voting and whether that offers consent to living under the constitution and the final part is taxation and expounds upon the idea of "taxation is theft". I found the first part to be the most interesting and most compelling. The idea of the legitimacy and common unquestioned belief in it is torn apart meticulously and simply opening up a whole new way of viewing the situation many of us live under. It g [...]

    14. If I had read this book 10 or even 5 years ago the ideas would have blown my mind, but many of these ideas are familiar to me either by hearing them discussed in libertarian podcasts or because I logically came to the same conclusions based on the NAP. Still a fantastic book, though and I would recommend to anyone who is just starting to explore libertarianism.The fact that this was written in the 19th century is what really still gets me, though. All of these ideas are outside of the acceptable [...]

    15. A articulate, passionate critique of the Constitution of the United States. I'm not sure what to think of his arguments and whether our society could exist without it. A political mindscrew of a book, but worth reading.

    16. This was my second go at No Treason. Spooner is always a refreshing read in this day and age where more credence is given to the State and its Constitution than what should ever be.

    17. A provocative and interesting way of thinking of the Constitution in the context of ourselves and it's authority over us. I have to disagree, however.

    18. Spooner's tractate really only makes one point: "Show me the so-called social contract, the so-called constitution of "we the people", so I can sign it! Until you do, I have not consented to your authority, and you, the government, are simply a band of robbers and murderers!" (This is a paraphase, not a direct quote.)Vitriolic and vile, scandalous and bitter, Spooner's individualistic brand of anarchism is a joy to read. Taking voluntarism to its logical conclusion - there can be no authority ex [...]

    19. I listened to the Mises Institute audio version found for free on iTunes U.This an excellent challenge to the idea of the "social contract" and I find it disappointing that his arguments here have no been more engaged with on an intellectual or academic level. His arguments are very compelling and, I think, must be reckoned with for anyone seeking to justify the claims of the "social contract."Within his critique he brings up a point that is absolutely crucial: if ultimately the authority that S [...]

    20. Spooner makes a tightly reasoned case as to why the Constitution is no legal binding contract.He makes a good comparison between a highwayman (looter) and the government in saying that atleast a highwayman doesn't try to make you think he's there to protect you, unlike our beloved government."The highwayman takes solely upon himself the responsibility, danger, and crime of his own act. He does not pretend that he has any rightful claim to your money, or that he intends to use it for your own ben [...]

    21. Interesting Quotes:"Many votes are usually given for candidates who have no prospect of success. Those who give such votes may reasonably be supposed to have voted as they did, with a special intention, not to support, but to obstruct the execution of, the Constitution; and, therefore, against the Constitution itself."-Lysander Spooner, No Treason: The Constitution of No AuthorityThat's a very interesting inference since I voted for a candidate with no chance of winning in part because he would [...]

    22. En este ensayo (que está incompleto y solo contiene los apartados 1, 2 y 6 ya que el resto se perdió) Spooner ataca la legitimidad de la existencia del Estado desde su parte más fundamental, su constitución, en este caso, la de Estados Unidos específicamente, detalla como se trata de un contrato sin validez y que los métodos que supuestamente sirven para legitimarlo son igual de inválidos como el sufragio y los impuestos partiendo por que en primer lugar son un atentado a la propiedad ind [...]

    23. This book was subversive in its time and at some point it keeps being subversive nowadays. In this book Lysander Spooner, based on his knowledge of the Constitution of United States and common sense, argued that Constitution was a contract of government that wouldn't adequately stop many abuses against liberty, and also managed to bring out the true purpose of the State and its political class, he was aware at how governments are enabled to rob, kill and enslave their citizens. He brings the fou [...]

    24. One of the most enlightening and honest critiques of the Constitution I have ever come across. Was recommended by the host of a podcast (among a list of others), and completely filled in the gaps of my prior knowledge about the true reality and history of the Constitution.This is an absolute MUST read for anyone who is into either American history or Constitutional law. Not only that, but anyone who has been hearing that voice in the back of your head nagging you that something just doesn't seem [...]

    25. Wow! This is another amazing book. Why didn't anyone show this to me when I was in high school or college? Written just after The Second War of Independence ("Civil War"), Spooner provides a very detailed and logical argument for the impotency of the US Constitution and describes the illegitimacy of government as we know it. Finally he concludes with a detailed examination of the finance of war and government. It may be shocking for some to read such a blunt account. He holds nothing back, there [...]

    26. More of a political tract rather than a "proper book" this was still a fantastically enlightening read. A a contemporary account of the post-Lincoln's War era that gives such a refreshing perspective over the bland lifeless dogma that counts these days as our official national history of the time. As was once written: The victor writes the history.Mr. Spooner did not stand apart from all his contemporaries in the abolistionist movement in not being a fan of Lincoln's use of force to compel behav [...]

    27. This book started out ok, but went downhill incredibly quickly and became long-winded with the author repeating himself every single paragraph towards the end.The worst thing is, I really wanted to like the book. I respect the liberalist and anarcho-capitalist movement a great deal--although it's a little too extreme for me to personally support it--but it felt like Mr Spooner was so infatuated with his own idea that the constitution can't legally bind anyone, that he started a self-absorbed ran [...]

    28. I think his concept that all governments are founded on unsigned contacts is an over simplified understanding on the concept of what government is. I love the fact that his argument is rooted in laws that are founded in the existence of civil government. To me, he seems like a pissed off teenager mad that he has to pay taxes. Also, as a sailor of the US Navy, being refereed as a hired murder sounds pretty bad ass; even though I've never taken a life.ever. I can't agree with people that say that [...]

    29. A brief but striking book by an American libertarian thinker. To give a flavor of his thinking, read these words (Page 9): "The fact is that the government, like a highwayman, says to a man: 'Your money, or your life.' And many, if not most, taxes are paid under the compulsion of that threat." Indeed, the first line of this work reads: "The Constitution has no inherent authority or obligation." This thin volume elaborates upon these points, and his words establish him as one of the more interest [...]

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