Growing a Feast: The Chronicle of a Farm-to-Table Meal

Growing a Feast The Chronicle of a Farm to Table Meal In Growing a Farmer Kurt Timmermeister recounted the toil and joy of wrestling an empty plot of land on Vashon Island Washington into a dairy farm Now he tells the story of a feast made from only w

  • Title: Growing a Feast: The Chronicle of a Farm-to-Table Meal
  • Author: Kurt Timmermeister
  • ISBN: 9780393350630
  • Page: 150
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Growing a Farmer, Kurt Timmermeister recounted the toil and joy of wrestling an empty plot of land on Vashon Island, Washington, into a dairy farm Now he tells the story of a feast made from only what the farm provides But the story of the meal begins two years earlier with the birth of a calf, Alice When she is grown, Alice will produce the cream to be churned intoIn Growing a Farmer, Kurt Timmermeister recounted the toil and joy of wrestling an empty plot of land on Vashon Island, Washington, into a dairy farm Now he tells the story of a feast made from only what the farm provides But the story of the meal begins two years earlier with the birth of a calf, Alice When she is grown, Alice will produce the cream to be churned into butter, made into sauce B arnaise, and served alongside poached eggs and kale gathered the morning of the feast Along the way we meet Leda, who trades onion seedlings for Kurt s cheese Michiko, who forages the white chanterelles for the antipasti course and Bill, whose large, thin skinned tomatoes will form the basis of the tomato upside down cake Rich in detail, resonant in story, Growing a Feast depicts the effort behind every meal, the farm that comes before every table.

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      Published :2018-08-09T06:32:50+00:00

    1 thought on “Growing a Feast: The Chronicle of a Farm-to-Table Meal”

    1. The book version of Babette's Feast, Growing a Feast will most appeal to those in the slow food movement or foodies. Timmermeister lost me on some of his descriptions, not because he's a poor writer but because I simply don't care enough about how to pickle some random vegetable to read his three page description. It did help me to appreciate what it takes to get a healthy meal on the table and I commend the author for his vision and for caring enough to bring it to fruition.

    2. I liked this book, but it was somewhat difficult to get through. I understand why some others quit on the book. For starters, it's not really a book, it's more of a diary written in clipped and stunted phrases. It is very matter of fact and in some passages that really works, and in some others it comes across as aggressive, or even angry. I'm not sure if the intent was to demonstrate how tough the life of a farmer is, or if Timmermeister just didn't feel like writing actual prose. It's also fru [...]

    3. Abandoned on page 28. I thought I was getting more of a warm fuzzy book on the whole farm to table thing. Anecdotes and whatnot. Instead, this book is more of a manual/diary of this guy's life getting this meal to the table. Last night: cow was born. It was beautiful and it made never want to eat beef again. Today: he's making cheese and I want to scream. "I separated the cheese with three blades for the hard cheese and poured the blah blah blah". STOP! He also seemed really arrogant. I almost a [...]

    4. Kurt Timmermeister lives on the 13-acre Kurtwood Farms on Vashon Island in Washington state. Kurt was a chef and originally bought the farm when it was smaller to try to grow more of his restaurant's food. He now is a full-time dairy farmer creating artisan cheese from his cow's milk. He also regularly hosts farm-to-table dinners for paying friends and guests that showcase all the abundance of food the farm creates. This book shows all the work that goes into one of these farm-to-table meals. It [...]

    5. The premise of this book is to provide a narrative for all of the preparation activities executed to provide a multi-course, gourmet and entirely on site produced feast for twenty people. The author is a professional chef / restaurateur turned farmer who primarily subsists by turning milk from his small herd of Jersey cows into cheese. The location of his farm is Vashon Island, outside of Seattle, WA.In essence, it is a series of detailed descriptions of mundane farm activities: planting onions, [...]

    6. I really enjoyed this detailed account of a former chef turned farmer/cheese maker and the 2 year journey from the birth of a calf to presenting a gourmet meal of food raised almost entirely on his farm. It really made me think about all the processes that go into growing our food as well as things like why artisan cheese costs $20/lb. As a wannabe homesteader and lover of home grown food, I got a lot out of the author's accounts of growing vegetables and other foods, and enjoyed reading his tho [...]

    7. I would probably rate it a 3.5 stars but only full stars are available. I felt like he changed his writing style a bit making it more detailed but at times I felt it was a bit too much detail. A lot of it I had already learned from reading his first book, some of it added greater depth and some of it could have been left out and I felt some details were missing. I feel out of his two books, his first was definitely my favorite and would have been enough. It was neat to see how the first book pla [...]

    8. This book was more of of a diary /dialogue of Kurt and his every day life on the farm. It was an interesting read but be prepared, it is very detailed. There are some aspect of his farm life that will offend vegans or rather, make them sad to read about such as slaughtering an animal or taking a new born calf away from it's mother after it has only been with her one day. His journey is an interesting one and while he does seems to do a lot of work,it seems very satisfying and simple.There are so [...]

    9. Timmermeister isn't a stellar writer, by any means. But he excels at putting us there, on his farm, as the onions are grown, the cheese made, the steer killed and butchered. It is his attention to - and love for - the small details of his life that draw me into his books. He epitomizes the 'write what you know' edict, and his farm is definitely what he knows. I enjoy following his meandering thoughts as he turns cheeses in the cold room, or feels ashamed of not starting *all* of his own vegetabl [...]

    10. I'm a farmer's granddaughter but I still learned a ton from this book. (It made me want to read his first book even more.) Timmermeister starts with the birth of a calf, which will eventually make its own contribution to the feast at the book's end. I do wish we could have learned more about Timmermeister himself (maybe this is in the first book?) and why he has made certain choices, how he feels about living on a farm by himself, and so on.

    11. Lots of detail on how a meal gets from the farm to the table, starting with milking the cow to make the cheese, and ending with leftover butter cookies on a table recently vacated by diners. I enjoyed the deep detail of the farm side of the meal, but got bored with the actual cooking description; for me the last two chapters were eternal and boring. But the first 200 pages were lovely!

    12. I didn't like this one as much as his first. Perhaps it just seemed like too much more of the same. I did learn a good bit about cheese making, but beyond that I felt it was going over harrowed ground, so to speak.

    13. This was a really amazing journey, I enjoyed the daily ramblings about a farm and the author is very descriptive making you crave to be there and to at least work a few days on his farm. the best part has to be in the very back of the book he includes all of the recipes he used for the dinner.

    14. A good read for anyone interested in the farm-to-table movement. Some sections became a bit tedious with pages and pages devoted to the making of a singular dish. Overall, an interesting and educational read.

    15. I finished the book because I hate to leave things unfinished but it did not hold my interest except for a few chapters. Neat story but drug out over 300 pages and it was dull.

    16. A solid work, with all the romantic phrasings one could desire to praise the slow food experience. I enjoyed the book, even though I find Timmermeister a little too self-absorbed.

    17. I'm learning so much about small farming, keeping cows, and cheese making. I am loving it. Some of the descriptions are overly long but I appreciate his need to be exact.

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