Triumph Forsaken: The Vietnam War, 1954-1965

Triumph Forsaken The Vietnam War Drawing on a wealth of new evidence from all sides Triumph Forsaken overturns most of the historical orthodoxy on the Vietnam War Through the analysis of international perceptions and power it shows

  • Title: Triumph Forsaken: The Vietnam War, 1954-1965
  • Author: Mark Moyar
  • ISBN: 9780521869119
  • Page: 235
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Drawing on a wealth of new evidence from all sides, Triumph Forsaken overturns most of the historical orthodoxy on the Vietnam War Through the analysis of international perceptions and power, it shows that South Vietnam was a vital interest of the United States The book provides many new insights into the overthrow of Ngo Dinh Diem in 1963 and demonstrates that the coupDrawing on a wealth of new evidence from all sides, Triumph Forsaken overturns most of the historical orthodoxy on the Vietnam War Through the analysis of international perceptions and power, it shows that South Vietnam was a vital interest of the United States The book provides many new insights into the overthrow of Ngo Dinh Diem in 1963 and demonstrates that the coup negated the South Vietnamese government s tremendous, and hitherto unappreciated, military and political gains between 1954 and 1963 After Diem s assassination, President Lyndon Johnson had at his disposal several aggressive policy options that could have enabled South Vietnam to continue the war without a massive US troop infusion, but he ruled out these options because of faulty assumptions and inadequate intelligence, making such an infusion the only means of saving the country.

    • [PDF] ↠ Free Download ☆ Triumph Forsaken: The Vietnam War, 1954-1965 : by Mark Moyar õ
      235 Mark Moyar
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ↠ Free Download ☆ Triumph Forsaken: The Vietnam War, 1954-1965 : by Mark Moyar õ
      Posted by:Mark Moyar
      Published :2018-05-11T15:49:26+00:00

    1 thought on “Triumph Forsaken: The Vietnam War, 1954-1965”

    1. Mark Moyar's history of the years between the French defeat in Indochina and the American combat presence in Vietnam has sparked controversy within the community of Vietnam historians. The divide is, as you'd expect, along the lines of those who feel we were right to become directly involved and those who see the war as a foolhardy, unnecessary enterprise. As I understand it, Triumph Forsaken has reignited the debate over which narrative of the war is the correct one.Moyar's history is a revisio [...]

    2. Setting himself against the great bastion of liberal academic orthodoxy, Mark Moyar endeavors to challenge a large number of historical claims in this the first volume of a projected two-volume history of the Vietnam War. Where historians have emphasized Ho Chi Minh’s nationalism and the failed opportunity for early negotiation and compromise, Moyar argues for the supremacy of Ho’s ideological communist beliefs, even to the compromise of national interests. Where others have deplored the cor [...]

    3. Mark Moyar has written a ‘revisionist’ history of the beginning of U.S. direct involvement in Viet Nam. History is constantly being revised as new information comes out and people take the time to really think or rethink logically about the new facts. He notes that Diem and Nhu were intent on redistributing land. “They built schools, hospitals, and places of worship for the masses.” Moyar states they ‘employed many of the undemocratic methods used by other authoritarian leaders of the [...]

    4. Whew! As I began to read this book I felt like I was reading about the Viet Nam War for the first time. This book is one of many that has been and will be written in the years coming ahead. There are are many avenues of this conflict that were not known prior to this book being written and after it was written. War as Sherman said is HellThe epic falseness of governtment reporting on warmaking issues.e methodology of its occurringe involvement of so many people that tried to present that they di [...]

    5. I've long understood that the United States lost the Vietnam War because it didn't set out to win, but I'd thought that stupidity and incompetence were the reasons for this failure. Reading this book, a scholarly history by a history Ph.D. who's taught at Cambridge, I find it hard not to add to these factors one of deliberation. It appears, from some of the actions that the United States took during the course of its involvement in Vietnam, that at least some people, in the media and government, [...]

    6. 4.5 starsThe strength of Moyer's book is that unlike most American historians of the Vietnam War, he actually considers and understands a Vietnamese social, cultural and political perspective to the historical events. His reconsideration of Ngo Dinh Diem is quite radical, and though hardly a hagiography, his assessment comes across as fair. Moyer is at his most convincing when suggesting that the coup to oust Diem was pretty much the most crucial mistake that ultimately led to American and South [...]

    7. Mark Moyar writes a very interesting take on the Vietnam War. He conveyed his wealth of knowledge on the subject very well, however I don't think he managed to achieve the goal of proving his point. In reading his book, there were certain aspects of the war and individuals involved that he glossed over, presumably because they didn't fit his narrative. I felt that his book was very driven by bias.It was definitely an interesting read, certainly well researched, and I will be reading volume 2 whe [...]

    8. I thought the author did a good job in making the case at the US involvement in Vietnam was the result of a series of logical decisions each one making sense at the time as the prudent thing to do but the cumulative effect being an undesireable result. This rings true. The authors implication that threatening China with nukes if they came into the war if we invaded the north would have worked is possible, but he dismisses the risk as negligible.

    9. A lot of pertinent information here about the lead in to the Vietnam fiasco and how we were slowly led deeper and deeper into the disaster. I found the book well written but leaving out too much of the history of Vietnam and the French colonialists. I got the feeling the author was politicly conservative and trying to make excuses for why we were there and why we lost.

    10. New look at the early days of American involvement in Vietnam. Revealing material gleened from recent sources that challenges some of the conventional opinions regarding Diem and the involvement of people other that Kennedy in his removal and death. Telling quote form archives in Hanoi. Ho Chi Minh on learning of Diem's death. "The Americans just won the war for us."

    11. Excellent book about the early stages of the Vietnam War. Must read if you are interested in the history of the war.

    12. A different take on Vietnam and thought-provoking for that, but Moyar's obvious anger at the "traditional" historian colors his interpretation.

    13. Causes you to reconsider what you thought you knew about the early years of the Vietnam conflict. The power of media/rogue reporters to influence/shape events is not a new phenomenon.

    14. The difference between Mark Moyar’s enormously long and exquisitely detailed political-military history of Vietnam and Tolstoy’s War and Peace is that Moyar cites his sources. Unfortunately, his notes-—if one actually takes time to examine them—-often do not support his point. It might better have been cast as a novel.Indeed, it appears to me Moyar’s obviously long and painstaking research does not even support one of his main theses: that the domino theory was, in fact, valid. His cas [...]

    15. Mark Moyar's book must be one of the most intriguing ones about the Vietnam War that I've read in a long time. His insistence on a major reassessment of the Vietnam War is compelling enough that it motivates you to collect all those assumptions you may have had about the war and reconsider them, one by one. The reverse spin Moyar puts on the received wisdom about the war, especially that which has been disseminated by a few prominent American journalists over the last 40 years, is formidable to [...]

    16. The first of a two volume history - looking back from an objective, and exhaustively documented, perspective. Moyar effectively dispels many of the hallowed conventional wisdoms about the Vietnam War.

    17. Brilliant revisionist history - meticulously researched.Opened my eyes about President Diem of South Vietnam.

    18. A neocon's view of key elements dictating America's early role in Vietnam from the French surrender at Dien Bien Phu to the post Saigon junta after America backed the assassination of Ngo Dinh Diem.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *