They're Rugby Boys, Don't You Know?

They re Rugby Boys Don t You Know Natalie Vellacott took a two year break from her job with Sussex Police to join the Logos Hope Christian missionary ship She was forever changed when the ship having repeatedly broken down in the Phi

  • Title: They're Rugby Boys, Don't You Know?
  • Author: Natalie Vellacott
  • ISBN: 9781291871210
  • Page: 494
  • Format: Paperback
  • Natalie Vellacott took a two year break from her job with Sussex Police to join the Logos Hope Christian missionary ship She was forever changed when, the ship having repeatedly broken down in the Philippines, she unexpectedly encountered and fell in love with a group of street teenage boys addicted to a solvent called rugby The dirty, wild, miserable, rabble were accuNatalie Vellacott took a two year break from her job with Sussex Police to join the Logos Hope Christian missionary ship She was forever changed when, the ship having repeatedly broken down in the Philippines, she unexpectedly encountered and fell in love with a group of street teenage boys addicted to a solvent called rugby The dirty, wild, miserable, rabble were accustomed to hostility Their curious approach in order to investigate the foreigners was cautious and sometimes abusive Local Filipinos watched from a distance, fascinated yet fearful These were the rugby boys untouchable and invisible, even dangerous and definitely not worthy of time, attention, love and care But now a small group of highly regarded foreigners seemed intent on drawing attention to them.A true missionary story about Christian hope being brought to the hopeless in the Philippines

    • ✓ They're Rugby Boys, Don't You Know? || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ Natalie Vellacott
      494 Natalie Vellacott
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ They're Rugby Boys, Don't You Know? || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ Natalie Vellacott
      Posted by:Natalie Vellacott
      Published :2018-05-24T18:35:55+00:00

    1 thought on “They're Rugby Boys, Don't You Know?”

    1. This book was a well written autobiographical story of Natalie’s trip and time spent in the philipines and her and her team's efforts with the “rugby” street boys of the area. I was encouraged by her story and also noted that the realities of the area wre well displayed by her writing. I was also encouraged by the fact that not everything went perfectly planned. Let me clarify a little. Her story is real. She struggled, not every one of the boys had a perfect outcome. And to me that is enc [...]

    2. Overall, this book certainly held my attention.I took off one star because, 1) there were a couple places that for me were rather awkward (since I’m a girl), 2) there were some punctuation errors, typos, etc and the style was at times difficult to follow, and 3) the boys seemed to run together.Also, towards the beginning, Ms. Vellacott seemed more concerned with getting the rugby boys off the streets and off of drug which is an admirable goal but not addressing the real problem--sin.However, t [...]

    3. Older missionary biographies tend to glamorize their subject matter while minimizing the emotional and spiritual dynamics involved in ministry. The author of this book, however, takes the reader by the hand, allowing them into her heart as she attempts to understand what God would have her do with the neglected “rugby boys.”Stepping off of the Logos Hope mission ship into the city of Olongapo in the Philippines, the author helps operate a Christian book stand on the local pedestrian bridge. [...]

    4. I have thought a long time how to sum up what I've just read and to put it into words is nearly impossible.This is a journey, that puts mine to shame, sometimes we don't realise how good we have it.Through the book, the compassion from this author is tangible, she doesn't judge the boys in any way but the stories are heartbreaking and hopeful in equal measures.It is a book that made me think 'what would I do in that situation and what are you going to do now?' I can't read this and then do nothi [...]

    5. For those who think that mission work is always glamorous and glorious, with mounds of fruit for a few weeks' labor, Rugby Boys is a trip back to reality. You'll learn patience along with Vellacott as she and her companions struggle mightily to get just a few boys free from solvent abuse and a self-destructive life on the street. The things that drive these boys to go back to lives of drugs, over and over again, may not be the same things you'd expect.A couple of highlights:(When two of the boys [...]

    6. As another reviewer has mentioned, this reads like a blog. It was simple, easy to read, and really fascinating. I love non-fiction books that give an insight into real life. The "Rugby boys" are like so many in the worldeding help and God's love in their addiction of drugs. But are we will to help people like that? I believe God is looking for those that will help just as Natalie Vellacott has.Toward the end I wasn't able to concentrate on the book as much. I think because there wasn't a lot of [...]

    7. Really enjoyed this book. I certainly sympathized with her in wanting to help the boys and am glad there is positive change for the most part.

    8. They're Rugby Boys, Don't You Know? is an inspirational story of one woman's journey to bring hope to the hopeless and love to those deemed unlovable. While her missionary ship was in port in the Philippines, Natalie Vellacott met a rag-tag group of street boys known as the 'rugby boys.' When I received this book to review, I thought of rugby as that extremely-painful-looking sport that's one-third soccer, one-third football, and one-third pain. (Can you tell I'm not a sporty person? xD) This bo [...]

    9. I wasn't sure how to review this book as I usually don't give in-depth reviews. Frankly I found out about this book by accident.And I was very happy that there was a audio version I could listen to. I am not going to delve into what I know about the author, or what exactly is the book about as there are enough of those reviews. Rather I want to talk about how the author truly understood and practiced what was and is - the heart of 'The Gospel'. The fruits of her labor through her faith are prese [...]

    10. An interesting look at how one woman volunteered to spend a couple of years working with Filipino street boys who were addicted to solvents - the rugby of the title.Natalie shares her joys and sorrows as she tries to bring the Gospel to these boys and give them an understanding of how their actions have consequences.In this type of work, there are many heartaches as the boys struggle to change their lives - some with more enthusiasm than others.Natalie shares the Gospel with them and tries to gi [...]

    11. Natalie Vallecott, a Christian Police Sergeant from England agreed to join a Logos Hope team on a ship to bring Christian literature to the world. What was intended to be a routine stop of three weeks at a port in the Philippines turned into a stop for repairs that lasted for months. During that time, Natalie's life was forever changed by a group of 'invisible' street children known as the Rugby boys.Rugby was an addictive substance these boys would use to get high on during the day because it h [...]

    12. Natalie’s book, “They’re Rugby Boys, Don’t You Know?” is an excellent read. Natalie is a missionary to the Philippines whose life forever changed when she encountered street boys addicted to a glue solvent called rugby. To everybody else, these children were invisible and a lost cause, but by God’s grace, doors opened for Natalie, and her missionary friends, to befriend and minister to them. This book details the heartache and victories of that ministry.To me, the best part of the bo [...]

    13. Impressed. That is what I feel when I see people living the life Jesus calls us to.Grateful. That's what I feel for people like this.This book presents a play-by-play account of a normal Christian girl as she takes a two year break from her life to minister to others. The ministry changes her, and others, as it often does when we sacrifice for the God Who gave everything for us.The book is not elegant, nor overly compelling, it simply tells a beautiful story of a normal person investing her life [...]

    14. This is an honest and heartbreaking story about living on the mission field. As a missionary, I related to many of Natalie's frustrations and her deep grief over the state of these lost souls. The style of storytelling is easy to read and to relate to. At the end of the book she also includes an update on each of the boys and her personal testimony. This book glorifies Jesus Christ in such an obvious way. Thank you for sharing Natalie. Praying for you and the boys (some of whom are now men).

    15. The author shares her experiences of trying to help the street boys in the Philippines. At first she came by missionary ship and later returned on her own. I was impressed with her dedication to the work. Most people would have considered those boys a lost cause but she persevered and learned to really love and care for them. Most importantly she shared the gospel story with them.

    16. A moving and poignant account of persistence and humanity among some of the poorest and most vulnerable children and teenagers in the Philippines. I admire the strength and courage of people who are willing to put their everyday life aside to work with the disadvantaged, as I know I couldn't be one of them.

    17. Plot: BWriting: CVocabulary: CIllustrations: noneLevel: EasyRating: PG (children living on the streets, drug abuse, petty crime)Worldview: Street people may be invisible, but they are cherished by G-D and so we should do the same. This book tells some of the adventures missionary Natalie Vellacott had while stationed with the ship Logos Hope in Subic Bay, Philippines. She writes about her outreach to a gang of street boys she encountered while working in at a book fair on a city bridge. This rea [...]

    18. I am so thankful for this book. In it, we see the persistent love of God poured out on the "invisible" children of Olongapo in the Philippines. These are boys addicted to a substance called "rugby" that they take while living on the streets. Natalie personifies Jesus as she seeks to redeem the boys from their circumstances when they can offer nothing in return. Her faith takes on feet as she seeks to minister to "the least of these." But the story also takes on heartbreak as not everyone is cont [...]

    19. A while ago, Natalie friended me on , but I never figured out what the connection was. She seemed like an interesting person with a heart for mission and people, so I thought the connection may be OK and accepted her request.I've been doing domestic US mission work for over 20 years, and international missions for 14, always short term of about a weeks or just a little more. Her experience in the Philippine's sounded intriguing so I read her book while on a pleasure cruise this past week. This w [...]

    20. The author of this book sent it to me as a e-book because I had it on my to read list. I enjoyed reading this book. It was a very informative book and was well written. I hope to read more books by this author.

    21. I got this book from librarything member giveaway.The book was about the kids inhaling solvents and living on the street and one person's efforts to deal with this problem.I must say, there is no doubt about the amazing job the author is doing to help kids to get back on the track, and it serves as an inspiration to us all. However I can't say that the book itself was something exceptional. It was an easy read and interesting at the beginning but somehow I got borred during the reading process. [...]

    22. I received a free copy of this book in return for an honest review.This book intrigued me for two reasons. I am also a former UK police officer as is the author of this book and I now live in the Philippines, the location for the tale of the "Rugby Boys."It was a thoroughly enjoyable and informative read and I recommend it to all who are concerned about the plight and suffering of our fellow humans no matter where they happen to live. I was aware of this problem and sometimes see the effects of [...]

    23. “The things described here are the grateful response of a Christian who has been rescued from a life of sin and death and reconciled to God for a life of hope and an eternal future in heaven.” That’s what the Author says in the biographical note (“Natalie’s Personal Story”) at the end of her book. In fact, Natalie Vellacott believed God’s promise that, ‘All who call on the name of the Lord will be saved’. And “God, by His grace, planted true faith in my heart and I determined [...]

    24. "They're Rugby Boys, Don't You Know," takes the reader on a true account of a Christian missionary whose ship gets grounded for an extended stay near Olongapo in the Philippines. As they conduct their mission on a bridge, the author discovers a group of young boys who are lost and neglected and addicted to what the locals call "rugby," inhalants that ease the hunger pains these poverty-stricken kids endure.The author can't simply look the other way and pretend the "rugby boys" are invisible. She [...]

    25. This book flowed nicely for me, and I found myself caught up in it. I liked that the information presented would give me a better chance if I were to do a similar mission at some point in my life. Not being around kids much, nor having my own, I felt I could still relate to them and their need to be seen as individuals who mattered. I gave 5 stars because I thought it was well written, had relevant information that I could apply myself, and gives me a feeling of "call to action," for my own comm [...]

    26. I've read a few books by missionaries or about missionary work. But most of them were too esoteric, failing to give a sense of day-t0-day life. But Natalie Vellacott does a fine job of charting her experiences in the Philippines.They're Rugby Boys, Don't You know? opened my eyes to what it's like engaging young boys (the "rugby" boys) who live in extreme poverty. "Rugby" is a slang reference to the solvents they inhale as a means of coping. Natalie takes you through the ups and downs of seeking [...]

    27. I got this book from librarything member giveaway. Natalie is a missionary on a ship stationed in the Phillipines. She meets the "Rugby Boys", who live on the street or under a bridge. "Rugby" is a slang reference to the solvents they inhale as a means of coping. The book shows her perserverance at helping them and the emotional rollercoaster she goes through. The boys seem to continually go back to their old lifestyle and some end up in Rehab. She is in a very poor area and the families have a [...]

    28. By the grace of God, Natalie coped with crisis after crisis that would have propelled many others into retreat, callousness or hostility. One of the things that amazed me the most was her intense desire to return to the streets and continue to sow and nurture the good seed into ground hardened, minds crippled, and souls crushed by human rejection and substance abuse. It is said that love for the lost will take you to the mission field, but love for the Lord will keep you there. Natalie’s love [...]

    29. I was given a free copy to read from the author. The author did not pay me for a review and all the thoughts here are my own honest opinion.This is a true story. So I am hereby not rating the events of the story, because, well, it's what happened in real life. Rather I am rating the author's writing style, and ability to present the events which had happened in real life.Wow.Let me say that again,Wow.I really admire that something that wasn't originally a mission of the time, Natalie helped (wit [...]

    30. While her missionary ship was in dry dock, the author spent time in the Philippines working with a group of street teenagers known as the ‘Rugby Boys”. She was one of the volunteers assigned to street evangelism, when she notices a group using household glue called “Rugby” to get high. She describes the balance the missionary has to juggle between enabling dependence on them and the possibility of redemption. She also defines the problems providing necessities for boys in rehab situation [...]

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