How the War Was Won: Air-Sea Power and Allied Victory in World War II

How the War Was Won Air Sea Power and Allied Victory in World War II World War II is usually seen as a titanic land battle decided by mass armies most importantly those on the Eastern Front Phillips Payson O Brien shows us the war in a completely different light In t

  • Title: How the War Was Won: Air-Sea Power and Allied Victory in World War II
  • Author: Phillips Payson O'Brien
  • ISBN: 9781107014756
  • Page: 173
  • Format: Hardcover
  • World War II is usually seen as a titanic land battle, decided by mass armies, most importantly those on the Eastern Front Phillips Payson O Brien shows us the war in a completely different light In this compelling new history of the Allied path to victory, he argues that in terms of production, technology and economic power, the war was far a contest of air and seaWorld War II is usually seen as a titanic land battle, decided by mass armies, most importantly those on the Eastern Front Phillips Payson O Brien shows us the war in a completely different light In this compelling new history of the Allied path to victory, he argues that in terms of production, technology and economic power, the war was far a contest of air and sea than land supremacy He shows how the Allies developed a predominance of air and sea power which put unbearable pressure on Germany and Japan s entire war fighting machine from Europe and the Mediterranean to the Pacific Air and sea power dramatically expanded the area of battle and allowed the Allies to destroy over half the Axis equipment before it had even reached the traditional battlefield Battles such as El Alamein, Stalingrad and Kursk did not win World War II air and sea power did.

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      Published :2019-02-25T13:37:08+00:00

    1 thought on “How the War Was Won: Air-Sea Power and Allied Victory in World War II”

    1. The author poses that the conventional view of the reason why the Allies were able to win WOII, namely that the was was decided in the traditional land battles such as El Alamein, Stalingrad and Kursk did not win World War II, but that the Allied path to victory was far more a contest of air and see supremacy.

    2. An intriguing approach to the subject. He makes some rather provocative observations that I’m not sure are well-founded. Still, it was not without its merits. I enjoyed the book, don’t get me wrong. I just question comments he made that dismiss individual soldiers’ bravery or most of the German-Russian War on the Eastern Front as of relatively minor importance. Call me old-fashioned but unlike Professor O'Brien, I still think the Battles of Stalingrad, Midway, and El Alamein were kind of i [...]

    3. Very disappointing. A wonderful premise, but in dire need of an editor. The language varies between academic and colloquial, and the author seems to be compelled to make the same point over and over again. How many time do you have to read that Japanese aviators got inadequate training because of fuel shortages? In one particularly egregious example, he ends one chapter with that piece of already told-too-many-times piece of information, on,y to begin the next chapter repeating it yet again. ps: [...]

    4. This book provides excellent justifications for its central claim that WW2 was won in the seas and in the air, and therefore that the Anglo-American alliance was more responsible for Nazi Germany's defeat than the Soviet Union was.

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