The Pumpkin Eater

The Pumpkin Eater The Pumpkin Eater is a surreal black comedy about the wages of adulthood and the pitfalls of parenthood A nameless woman speaks at first from the precarious perch of a therapist s couch and her smar

  • Title: The Pumpkin Eater
  • Author: Penelope Mortimer
  • ISBN: 9780241240106
  • Page: 183
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Pumpkin Eater is a surreal black comedy about the wages of adulthood and the pitfalls of parenthood A nameless woman speaks, at first from the precarious perch of a therapist s couch, and her smart, wry, confiding, immensely sympathetic voice immediately captures and holds our attention She is the mother of a vast, swelling brood of children, also nameless, and the The Pumpkin Eater is a surreal black comedy about the wages of adulthood and the pitfalls of parenthood A nameless woman speaks, at first from the precarious perch of a therapist s couch, and her smart, wry, confiding, immensely sympathetic voice immediately captures and holds our attention She is the mother of a vast, swelling brood of children, also nameless, and the wife of a successful screenwriter, Jake Armitage The Armitages live in the city, but they are building a great glass tower in the country in which to settle down and live happily ever after But could that dream be nothing than a sentimental delusion At the edges of vision the spectral children come and go, while our heroine, alert to the countless gradations of depression and the innumerable forms of betrayal, tries to make sense of it all doctors, husbands, movie stars, bodies, grocery lists, nursery rhymes, messes, aging parents, memories, dreams, and breakdowns How to pull it all together Perhaps you start by falling apart.

    • Best Read [Penelope Mortimer] ↠ The Pumpkin Eater || [Chick Lit Book] PDF ☆
      183 Penelope Mortimer
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Penelope Mortimer] ↠ The Pumpkin Eater || [Chick Lit Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Penelope Mortimer
      Published :2018-05-06T16:31:19+00:00

    1 thought on “The Pumpkin Eater”

    1. 4.5 stars rounded upI must admit I haven’t read anything by Mortimer before and on the evidence of this book I should have. It is about a woman in a downward spiral and is an acerbic and humorous (in a very bleak way) comment on marriage, gender relations and being a woman being controlled by men (husbands and assorted professionals, mainly medical). Mortimer writes in rather a sparse way leaving the reader to do some of the work, making one feel much more involved in the main character’s di [...]

    2. Quite a hard book to read, and it's perfectly logical that the author really did struggle with depression, insecurity and anxiety. The way she speaks is relatable to anyone who has felt that way (myself included). The worries, the anger, the stress she feels is all familiar. I can't say I enjoyed the book but I understood it, and maybe that's better.

    3. This totally made my CCLaP best-of-2011.If you read anything at all about this book, you will immediately learn the following salient points: Originally published in the early sixties (and reissued this year by the divine NYRB), it is a proto-feminist novel (predecessor to The Feminine Mystique), it's quite autobiographical, it's told by an unnamed narrator who is married to a philanderer (her fourth husband) and has an army of children (number never specified), and it opens in an analyst's offi [...]

    4. Heartbreaking. One of the best final chapters of a book from recent memory.I would like to think myself a champion for all things feminism - but this book has me feeling down about my maleness.More Mortimer needs to be reprinted - I will definitely be seeking out her other books. Thanks to Proustitute for the recommendation.

    5. If I wanted to, I could stand on a street corner and loudly proclaim, “I am a Buddhist!” Or, I could proclaim, “I am a Democrat!” My merely saying one or both of those things would make it so.But a fella cannot proclaim himself a Feminist. A male has to earn that, first, and even then it’s up to the eye of the female beholder. Like the balk call in baseball. And while I like to consider myself pro-woman, I’m not sure I would ever pass the test to be a full-fledged Feminist. I just do [...]

    6. and here's to you, mrs. armitage / jesus loves you more than you will know (wo wo wo)sì diverse, eppure. eppure la mrs. robinson de il laureato e la signora armitage di penelope mortimer hanno avuto entrambe, a distanza di tre anni, il volto e il carisma di anne bancroft. e hanno dato voce entrambe allo stesso malessere, esistenziale ed epocale: quello di un certo tipo di donna, in un certo ambiente, con certe aspettative. dopodiché una (quella per cui simon & garfunkel adattano il testo s [...]

    7. When Mrs. Armitage was a child her mother kept a wool drawer in the dining room chest consisting of nothing but leftover knitting scraps. On rainy afternoons she was made to tidy the drawer for no other reason then for something to do. Busy work. Mrs. Armitage likened it to the way " they make prisoners dig holes and fill them up again." Her psychiatrist offered"she would like to be something useful like a tea cozy. This is the story of a woman losing her way in the quest of finding a sense of p [...]

    8. I finished reading The Pumpkin Eater this afternoon in my parents' living room. My parents were bickering, as per usual, about my mother's lateness in getting ready to leave the house, and my father's lack of concern for his appearance, ready to step out of the house wearing swim trunks as shorts.Finally, I felt compelled to say something. "I'm only here one day a week and yet this conversation is making me tired. How do you guys have the energy to talk to each other like this all the time?" Mom [...]

    9. “Peter, Peter pumpkin eater,Had a wife but couldn't keep her;He put her in a pumpkin shellAnd there he kept her very well.”It would be only fair to begin with this seemingly innocent poem which, on reading carefully, won’t seem all that innocent. The harsh aspect of this poem is not that He put her in a pumpkin shell but, to intend that he kept her very well in a shell. Well, it is not all that fair to draw conclusions from a children’s poem whose meaning increases our curiosity. Perhaps [...]

    10. Le lievi increspature del destinoC'è un doppio registro che rende questo romanzo poco riuscito, nonostante i temi interessanti che affronta. Leggevo la storia di questa donna, una ricca inglese degli anni '50, che trova la sua ragione di vita nei matrimoni seriali (4) ma soprattutto nello sfornare figli (credo 5 o giù di lì sua vera passione) apparentemente trascinata qua e là dalle onde del destino, e continuavo a ripetermi che c'era qualcosa di implausibile, di stonato o inspiegabile nel t [...]

    11. Una drammatica feconditàLa prosa brillante e coraggiosa di Penelope Mortimer ha una voce ostinata, onesta e attaccata alla verità e si rivela con l'indole malinconica e profonda di un racconto lieve e nudo, che travolge con un fascino perturbante le nostre emozioni più elementari. Il romanzo narra la disperazione di una donna dalla vita interiore smisurata, il tormento e la colpa per l'incapacità di rassegnarsi alla labilità dell'amore e alla consuetudine del tradimento; mette in scena l'il [...]

    12. A beautifully written story of one woman's descent into madness.A gripping book which is utterly compelling.Mrs Armitage has three husbands a brood of children, her only role in life to keep on having children.Then she meets Jake a script writer.The vision of building a glass tower in the country to finally settle, is this reality or a dream?She then breaks down in Harrods in the linen department.A dark comedy which made me feel for Mrs Armitage as the book reaches its conclusion.Do we always ma [...]

    13. I reread Penelope Mortimer's 1962 novella, The Pumpkin Eater, for my book club. It is a wonderfully vivid and harrowing novella in equal measure, which charts an emotional breakdown, and was published a year before Sylvia Plath's seminal The Bell Jar. The Pumpkin Eater is heavily autobiographical, with its markedly realistic scenes and character development throughout.One is immediately pulled in to this important book. The unnamed protagonist, who is identified only through her married surname [...]

    14. Read this for booktubeathon challenge - read a book that is older than you.This book was first published in 1962 and the writing is fabulous. It's a semi-autobiographical, proto-feminist novel about a woman with loads of kids (I don't think you are ever told how many, but it feels like there are masses of them - tho the author herself had six), married to her fourth husband. The woman (just realised - don't think she is named, just goes by 'Mrs Armitage') is depressed, going to therapy and takin [...]

    15. Penelope Mortimer’s The Pumpkin Eater is a brilliant book, and I am not surprised to find from GoodReads that it has been reissued as a classic by NYRB. (The copy up here is a well-loved Penguin from 1979.) Published in 1962, The Pumpkin-Eater pre-dates all the feminist writing that was so exhilarating to read as the sixties progressed, but I knew Mortimer’s name because I’ve read something of hers before. (Daddy’s Gone A-hunting, I think, but it’s too long ago to be sure).For those wh [...]

    16. In this novel the first-person, female, narrator details the gradual disintegration of a marriage that was never likely to work. She has already been married and has several children (with one exception they are an amorphous bunch) and he just seems to find the idea of being a part of this ready-made family an appealing idea, as long as nothing much is expected of him, especially not fidelity. The book is written in a very easy and light style (a few chapters consist, almost entirely, of dialogu [...]

    17. A story about a woman who has gone through four husbands and had many more children, and is struggling to find her identity. Some of it reminds me of the similar conflict in The Cocktail Party."So we were back at the beginning again. There was no end. You learn nothing by hurting others; you only learn by being hurt. Where I had been viable, ignorant, rash and loving I was now an accomplished bitch, creating an emptiness in which my own emptiness might survive. We should have been locked up whil [...]

    18. Quite an odd book, but I really enjoyed it. If you love dark comedy or classics, I'd definitely recommend this one.

    19. This book was amazing.Much is put in place using dialogue, but this is not the dialogue of a Gaddis or a Compton-Burnett. They use their dialogue to get at abstract ideas, to worry over a problem of some kind, or, in the case of Gaddis, to make something that is built entirely from language itself.This dialogue does not leave you lost in time and space; even when unattributed and unmarked, the movements from person to person, from period to period are clear and easy to follow. This dialogue is t [...]

    20. What can I say about this text? well written book about domestic unbliss, the unamed lead character can't seem to have sex without having a child pop out. Is this text like Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway where you reading the character's thoughts back and forth but not really because you really only read unamed narrator's thoughts so I can't write a proper review because I can't really go into a detail report. I know I want to read this text again. P.S. The 1960's film with the same name as the b [...]

    21. When this book was first published in 1962, it may very well have been viewed as a “seminal novel of contemporary women’s fiction”. Reading it now, however, it has become a work of merely historical curiosity, describing how a woman could become trapped into a life of domesticity, depression and isolation, eventually sidelined as her family needs her less and less. As a stay-at-home mother myself, I can see that it is still possible to become isolated and depressed. Yet it is so much easie [...]

    22. I found this book to be pretty amazing. Clearly very personal, but incredibly complicated as well. In fact, I haven't yet figured out this book--if ever a reader can "figure out" a book. The power comes from the honesty and brutality of this book. No holds barred for this woman who is really struggling to be a wife, mother, love, person. I'm wary as the next man of over-sentimental, over-dramatic, over-personal semi-autobiographical novels, but this one is funny and upsetting at the same time, w [...]

    23. I picked this up at the library on a whim and I'm so glad I did. A brutal, raw account of the breakdown of the main character and aftermath, based on Mortimer's own life. The emotional cruelty and manipulation between the characters is breathtaking, and powerfully written. The dialogue sections are particularly impressive - what is said is short and sparse, but the reader feels the weight of what is left unsaid. I can't write a review that does this book justice and urge everyone to read it.

    24. Esta entre 3,5 y 4 estrellas sigo en duda No se como explicar este libro por que está prácticamente basado en la vida de la escritora. El estilo de la escritura es ágil, no es denso,es apasionante, profundo y personal pero el final del libro me dejo como WTF ??? Tiene que a ver un epílogo o algo por favorrrr Pero Nooo, no había :( . La protagonista me recordó de cierta manera a Amy de Gone Girl, me pregunto si Flynn leyó alguna vez este libro jummm

    25. A woman searches for happiness whilst considering her multiple husbands and children‎I found the writing and characters in this book compelling.

    26. Somehow it is common knowledge that Penelope Mortimer's 'The Pumpkin Eater' charts the cut and thrust of her tempestuous marriage to the more famous John Mortimer, successful literary luminary, father of many beautiful progeny and blessed with a wit and warmth apparently so irresistible that to know him was to forgive him all his misdemeanours, of which there were reputed to be many. What, I wondered, could the wife of such a philanderer have to say beyond bean-spilling and bitter recrimination? [...]

    27. Penelope Mortimer's The Pumpkin Eater was an unusual yet mesmerizing read, unlike anything that I've come across in contemporary fiction. Its no-holed-bar bluntness and use of flippant observation makes it a cross between a comedy and tragedy. The best categorization that I would put it into would be a pre-feminist tragicomedy, because there are components of it that are wittily absurd and other elements that are genuinely moving-for deep human issues are introduced, like an unhappy marriage, in [...]

    28. A little dull at times, brilliant at others. For most parts the book was in dialogues, one of my favourite conversation is [Spoiler Alert] when the narrator confronts Jake with his infidelity. Jake wants her to forget it and says that it's the future that matters now but the narrator says, "No. Not the future. The truth." Although it's more practical to forget about these kind of things and focus on the future but in reality it's much more complex. Your past always transcends into your future. I [...]

    29. In Penelope Mortimer's most popular work, we read a semi-autobiographical account of one woman's descent into what might be a postpartum depression, but then again, is probably more likely a sad commentary on the deplorable times when women had no audible voice. It explores the "problem that has no name" that has reared its ugly head for one wife and mother living in London (Betty Friedan wrote about this "feminine mystique" a year after this book was published).Married four times with eight chi [...]

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