At the Edge of the Orchard

At the Edge of the Orchard What happens when you can t run any further from your past Ohio James and Sadie Goodenough have settled in the Black Swamp planting apple trees to claim the land as their own Life is harsh in t

  • Title: At the Edge of the Orchard
  • Author: Tracy Chevalier
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 189
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • What happens when you can t run any further from your past Ohio, 1838 James and Sadie Goodenough have settled in the Black Swamp, planting apple trees to claim the land as their own Life is harsh in the swamp, and as fever picks off their children, husband and wife take solace in separate comforts James patiently grows his sweet tasting eaters while Sadie gets drunk oWhat happens when you can t run any further from your past Ohio, 1838 James and Sadie Goodenough have settled in the Black Swamp, planting apple trees to claim the land as their own Life is harsh in the swamp, and as fever picks off their children, husband and wife take solace in separate comforts James patiently grows his sweet tasting eaters while Sadie gets drunk on applejack made fresh from spitters Their fighting takes its toll on all of the Goodenoughs a battle that will resonate over the years and across America.Fifteen years later their youngest son, Robert, is drifting through Gold Rush California Haunted by the broken family he fled years earlier, memories stick to him where mud once did When he finds steady work for a plant collector, peace seems finally to be within reach But the past is never really past, and one day Robert is forced to confront the brutal reason he left behind everything he loved.In this rich, powerful story, Tracy Chevalier is at her imaginative best, bringing to life the urge to wrestle with our roots, however deep and tangled they may be.

    • Best Read [Tracy Chevalier] ↠ At the Edge of the Orchard || [Horror Book] PDF ↠
      189 Tracy Chevalier
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Tracy Chevalier] ↠ At the Edge of the Orchard || [Horror Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Tracy Chevalier
      Published :2018-06-13T18:55:56+00:00

    1 thought on “At the Edge of the Orchard”

    1. The novel starts out with alternating chapters of a husband and wife , having settled in Black Swamp, Ohio traveling west from Connecticut when they could go no further through the mud. These are not just alternating points of view but so opposing - it had me wondering why they married in the first place . James wanted to grow apples for eating and Sadie wanted to grow "spitters" for the applejack. This is a vindictive, embittered husband and wife and I was heartbroken for their children.I know [...]

    2. Sometimes, a book comes along that somehow ticks all the boxes. This is one of those books: it's minutely-researched, surefooted, touching and at times, heartbreakingly beautiful, and yet it manages to remain deceptively simple throughout, navigating the potentially difficult waters of the multiple narrative, multiple-timeline style as easily as a clipper ship on a sunny summer's day. The voices are rich and individual; the attention to detail impressive; and the scent of apples, damp earth, pin [...]

    3. 3.5 Black Swamp, Ohio is as far as the James and Sadie Goodenough with their children manage to travel. Here they settle, here Johnny Appleseed finds them and sells James apple trees and apple seeds.These trees would prove a big bone of contention between husband and wife. Dysfunctional family, apple trees, apple jack, Hobbs a seed collector, the redwoods, sequoias, the gold rush, are some of the things touched on in this novel.We start with the family and their efforts to settle in this swamp, [...]

    4. You know when you read an amazing book where the landscape becomes one of the characters? You know: the moors in Return of the Native, or the highlands (and the house) in Wuthering Heights. In At the Edge of the Orchard, you have trees. Apple trees, and redwoods, and giant sequoias. The trees and landscape are also metaphors that reflect the lives of the characters. The Black Swamp, where everyone is stuck and it's hard to grow. Some apples are sweet and worth saving, others become bruised and s [...]

    5. I like Tracy Chevaliers’ writing and was keen to read this story which starts in Ohio in 1838. The aptly named place called Black Swamp, where James and Sadie Goodenough, live is a harsh landscape. James is committed to growing apple trees. Golden Pippins brought over from England initially are his favourites. His wife resents her husband and the life they are living. She spends much of her time drunk on applejack and trying to sabotage his efforts at growing good eating apples and developing [...]

    6. Just having the word "Orchard" in the title is probably enough to get my attention; but an apple orchard plus Tracy Chevalier plus a good audio rendition with a short waiting list, and I'm 100% committed. I liked this book a lot, except that it ended too soon IMO. There's the Goodenough family in Black Swamp, Ohio, and what an awful name for a town. Of course, awful things happen there. A couple with 5 living children and 5 dead, whose marriage is as sour as the apples they raise. James and Sadi [...]

    7. This is an intense story of a married couple, Sadie and James Goodenough, and their children who settled in the swamps of Ohio in 1838. James has a love of apples and struggles with the muddy swampland to grow an apple orchard. He buys his seeds and saplings from none other than Johnny Appleseed. James loves the sweet apples but his wife Sadie loves the sour apples, called spitters, as those she can use to make applejack, which helps her escape the trials of the swamp. The biggest trial they fac [...]

    8. My primary complaints with this novel are the characters were flat and stereotypical and the story dragged for the first two-thirds of the novel. None of the characters were highly likable or engaging. They did not seem to have significant depth. If you are new to Tracy Chevalier's work, I would recommend her earlier novels over this title.

    9. I am a huge fan of Tracy Chevalier and have read all of her previous novels, I've been very excited about this one since I heard about it late last year.What fascinates me most about Tracy Chevalier and her writing is the fact that in every one of her books I've been introduced to a subject, or a place that I knew nothing about before. Whether is is Mary Anning, discovering fossils on the beach in the early 1800s (Remarkable Creatures, 2010), or Griet the young Dutch girl who became the model fo [...]

    10. It was better than expected. It features a women who had no business to be a mother to ten children. Highly dysfunctional family trying to settle in black swamps of Ohio. Couple who managed to kill each other. And a boy who decides to to marry a hooker just because she told him she was pregnant with his child knowing he doesn't love her and never will. No happy endings here, just hard life, raw emotions, and guilt. And it is third book in my reading history that made me sniff once or twice. Quit [...]

    11. (2.5) Spanning 1838 to 1856 and reaching from Ohio to the California coast, this is the story of the Goodenough family. James and Sadie left the East Coast to settle in Ohio’s formidable Black Swamp. It’s not a happy life, and not just because of the difficulty of raising healthy apple trees or children. As soon as eldest son Robert gets the chance to leave he eagerly heads west. I like how Chevalier wove in historical figures here, particularly William Lobb, the English seed agent Robert wo [...]

    12. In 1838, James & Sadie Goodenough have settled where their wagon got stuck in the muddy, stagnant swamps in Northwest Ohio. They have children. They work hard to clear a patch of land and bought saplings from a local man called Johnny Appleseed.In 1853, Robert their youngest child, is wandering through gold rush California. Haunted by the broken family he left behind.This story is a bit depressing at the beginning but I did like the history behind this book. You can tell the author has resea [...]

    13. This review was originally posted on Between My LinesAt The Edge of the Orchard by Tracy Chevalier is another winner for me from this creative author.  Tracy Chevalier writes fiction that is meticulously researched, brings the past vividly to life and entertains the hell out of me.  I love that she isn't afraid to shock with crude words, and even cruder situations.  Most literary fiction bores me, but this shock element, along with her unexpected imagery draws me in.  At The Edge of the Orch [...]

    14. In her latest novel, Tracy Chevalier returns to Ohio, the setting of The Last Runaway, except this story is not about quilts but trees, from the humble apple tree to the majestic sequoia. The story begins in 1838, with Sadie and James Goodenough literally stuck in the mud in the Black Swamp, Ohio where they hope to stake their claim by growing an apple orchard. It is a truly bleak, inhospitable environment with bitter winters and the summer swamp fever ruthlessly claiming so many lives year in y [...]

    15. I really enjoyed this novel. Quite a few reviewers have stated that the first parts of this book was slow and dragged. I actually preferred it to the second half. The hard life of starting from nothing, learning of the dysfunctional family dynamics, discovering Johnny Appleseed on a whole new level, and the apple Orchard itself (I felt a part of the descriptive surroundings quite often). The second half dragged more to me, but I would recommend this book without hesitation.

    16. I won this book as a first read. I always feel a bit sad when the book doesn't sweep me off my feet. This book was depressing and sad. I wanted to connect with someone about something and just never did. It kept my interest enough to finish, but I was glad when it came to an end.

    17. This book was not one of my favorites. I've read two other books by this author (Girl With a Pearl Earring and Remarkable Creatures) and really liked them. This book was depressing because of the dysfunction that was rampant throughout. I don't usually slash the stars for that, but it felt like a 'shock and awe' campaign. I like for there to be some underlying message or understanding or some thing along those lines. I want it to mean something, but I couldn't feel any of that. It was just there [...]

    18. I really enjoyed this story about surviving in the US in the mid 1800s. Geographically, the story takes place in Connecticut, Ohio, a little bit in Detroit, Minnesota and Texas, then California. The premise is trees, mostly apple and redwood, but there is wonderful character development too.

    19. A great audio and a well written story. This is my favorite so far of Chevalier's books. I range 3-5 stars with her stuff but I think this is the best of the ones I've read so far.

    20. I've read 4 of Chevalier's other books, and liked them all, so I picked this one up even though none of the description's keywords triggered any of my particular interests. It's an interesting book or, almost, two books. The story is sharply split, and I'm not sure the division works that well.In the first quarter of the book, we meet a Westward-bound pioneer family who have run out of steam and settled in the swamps of Ohio. (I didn't even know there was a swamp in Ohio: enpedia/wiki/Great_B). [...]

    21. In Tracy Chevalier's eighth novel, At the Edge of the Orchard, the Goodenough family is anything but good enough. Told in alternating narratives set in 1838 Ohio and 1853 California, this is mostly the story of Robert Goodenough, the youngest son of James and Sadie. In 1838 he is a bright-eyed, quiet, observant child, about 9 years old, who bears witness to the increasingly brutal feud between his parents. The Goodenoughs have an apple orchard, and James has a romanticized affection for his belo [...]

    22. This is about the Goodenough family who lives in northwest Ohio about 12 miles from Perrysburg in the 1850's, back when it was known as the Black Swamp. This is like a dysfunctional Little House on the Prairie with the daily struggles of food and disease and day to day life of living on your own in an inhospitable environment. You grow to love some of the Goodenough children-- quiet, shy, and smart Robert and Martha-- and hate the alcoholic mother and apple-tree-obsessed father who are constantl [...]

    23. 8,5 de 10*Se tivesse que classificar este livro dentro de um género, seria, certamente, em romance épico. Do tempo em que homens e mulheres desbravavam terreno para ocupar, em que a posse dessa terra era uma luta diária contra os elementos da natureza. É um género de livro pouco vulgar e que, por isso, sabe tão bem ler!Comentário completo em:abibliotecadajoao/

    24. Good story, I really liked how it ended. It wrapped up the story lines and left enough undone for a sequel (if there is one). The story started with apples and Johnny Appleseed was woven into the tale. The Goodenoughs are an extremely disfunctional family, youngest son Robert sets off on his own to travel and see the west. 3.75 stars rounded up to 4.

    25. Robert Goodenough has learned so much from William Lobb, famed worldwide plant collector that in 1853 he is often sent to travel the Western United States in search of unusual specimens to be sold to other countries in the British realm, such as the giant sequoia. His skill in working with plants came naturally since his family produced an apple orchard in Black Swamp, Ohio, a small community where the pioneer Goodenough family’s wagon became mired during a westward migration from New England [...]

    26. One rotten apple can spoil the entire bunch. Sarah is a drunk. Abrasive, mean-spirited, and bitter, she is angry at her lot in life and find solace in apple jack, the liquor made from the bitter apples her husband is attempting to grow in the inhospitable soil of the frontier. James loves his sweet apples, the seedlings he patiently carts around and transplants from his nostalgic home in Connecticut. He relishes their taste because they remind him of the possibility of a sweet life. It is the on [...]

    27. This novel was at its best in the first half, where the author painted the lives of a pioneering family. The insights into each of the flawed characters made them seem very real, and if I couldn't entirely sympathize with them all, I could at least understand their motivations and what made them tick. Even the horrible Sadie had sorrows and frustrations that I could connect with. Had the author chosen to end the story with the family in Ohio, this would have been a very good novella. But the sec [...]

    28. Tracy Chevalier’s At the Edge of the Orchard is such an enjoyable work of historical fiction that I didn’t want it to end. It’s not just that so many of the characters were real (John Chapman/Johnny Appleseed, William and Thomas Lobb, Billie Lapham), but Robert and Martha Goodenough and Molly were so deftly drawn, they too seemed to have actually lived along with the others during this time period. The description of the redwoods and the Sequoias will satisfy any lover of nature (you may w [...]

    29. Îmi plac mult romanele lui Tracy Chevalier. Sunt romane istorice, scrise într-un stil lejer care nu lasă să se întrevadă imensa muncă de documentare din spatele poveștii. Cel mai mult îmi place felul în care scriitoarea americană recreează atmosfera istorică a cărților sale: Delft-ul medieval al lui Vermeer (Fata cu cercel de perlă), Parisul medieval al tapiserilor și vopsitorilor (Doamna și licornul), Londra de secol XVIII – în pragul iluminismului, dar ducând după sine m [...]

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