Johnny Osage

Johnny Osage Johnny Osage is the son of Hannah Fowler and the brother of Rebecca of The Believers He comes by his name because of his close friendship with the Osage Indians His story is told against the backgroun

  • Title: Johnny Osage
  • Author: Janice Holt Giles
  • ISBN: 9780395077351
  • Page: 214
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Johnny Osage is the son of Hannah Fowler and the brother of Rebecca of The Believers He comes by his name because of his close friendship with the Osage Indians His story is told against the background of the old Osage homeland, the present state of Oklahoma, for by 1821 the frontier had moved westward and Johnny, a restless man who preferred the wilderness unspoiled byJohnny Osage is the son of Hannah Fowler and the brother of Rebecca of The Believers He comes by his name because of his close friendship with the Osage Indians His story is told against the background of the old Osage homeland, the present state of Oklahoma, for by 1821 the frontier had moved westward and Johnny, a restless man who preferred the wilderness unspoiled by civilization, moved with it and became a partner in his brother in law s trading post.To such a man, the arrival of the group of missionaries to improve the Osages is far from welcome And to Judith Lowell, the young teacher dedicated to educating Osage children according to the laws of God and the White Man, Johnny s openly expressed admiration for Osage ways is shocking and inexplicable But both of them are honest and brave enough to dare to open their minds and hearts to convictions other than their own.The touching love story of Johnny and Judith is set against a dark and bloody background of raids and massacres in the bitter feud between Osages and Cherokees a feud in which the U.S Government plays the role of uneasy arbiter.

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      214 Janice Holt Giles
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      Posted by:Janice Holt Giles
      Published :2018-09-05T03:03:27+00:00

    1 thought on “Johnny Osage”

    1. I bought this book at an antique mall because I liked the way the cover looked (my version is not like the one pictured here). I used it for a couple of years stacked up with a couple of other books as decoration. But then one day, I thought it was a little silly to have a book in my house as decoration that I had never even opened up. So I sat down and in a couple of days I finished this book. It was a easy, steady read. There was enough flucuation between action and romance to keep me interest [...]

    2. I was really disappointed in this book. Giles wrote one of the books (Hannah Fowler) that was a favorite when I was a teenager devouring all the historical fiction I could get my hands on. I've had Johnny Osage on my bookshelf for a while; since it's about roughly the same time period and set in the same place as the two novels I've written, I didn't want to chance letting myself be subconsciously influenced. Well, I don't think I should have worried. This book had some parts that hearkened back [...]

    3. The Osage tribe of Native Americans is beautifully and respectfully described in this story of Johnny "Osage" Fowler, and takes place in 1821 in what is now Oklahoma. My Gran (grandmother) once told me that any book written by Janice Holt Giles is a well-written story worth reading, and I would agree with her! I have a few of this author's books. When reading this story, I can appreciate all the hardships my ancestors might have faced nearly 200 years ago, when this country was young and the dan [...]

    4. I'm beginning to believe JHG can't write a bad book - I've not read them all yet, but I have yet to read one that I didn't enjoy. That being said, this one didn't quite "grab" me as much as some of the others have - but I think it was probably more of a personal preference thing than any lack in the book itself. It was nice to read more about the children of my beloved Hannah Fowler - especially Stephen and Rebecca from The Believers

    5. The relations between the whites and the Indians (Native Americans) was at best touchy on the eastern frontier. But the relations between the tribes was just as touchy. As a matter of fact it was mostly down right hostile. Kentucky wasn't called the Dark and Bloody ground because it had red grass.The wars between the Cherokee and the Iroquois predate this novel which concerns itself with the times of the very real Cherokee and Osage wars.

    6. I read this as a young adult and reread it recently. I love Janice Holt Giles. Her best was The Believers, about a woman trapped into joining the Shakers in Kentucky. Recommend. It was written in the late 1950s but it is timeless.

    7. This was in my collection, has been recycled.Well written, wonderful point of view. Didn't care for the subject, native Indians in Arkansas in the early 1800s, pioneers, U.S.Army vs. the Cherokee Indians. Character was well developed. The characters are what I remember most.

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