Lectures and Fragments

Lectures and Fragments The lectures or discourses of Musonius Rufus That There is No Need of Giving Many Proofs for One Problem That Man is Born with an Inclination Toward Virtue That Women Too Should Study Philosophy

  • Title: Lectures and Fragments
  • Author: Musonius Rufus
  • ISBN: 9781329444591
  • Page: 311
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The lectures or discourses of Musonius Rufus 1 That There is No Need of Giving Many Proofs for One Problem 2 That Man is Born with an Inclination Toward Virtue 3 That Women Too Should Study Philosophy 4 Should Daughters Receive the Same Education as Sons 5 Which is Effective, Theory or Practice 6 On Training 7 That One Should Disdain Hardships 8 That KingsThe lectures or discourses of Musonius Rufus 1 That There is No Need of Giving Many Proofs for One Problem 2 That Man is Born with an Inclination Toward Virtue 3 That Women Too Should Study Philosophy 4 Should Daughters Receive the Same Education as Sons 5 Which is Effective, Theory or Practice 6 On Training 7 That One Should Disdain Hardships 8 That Kings Also Should Study Philosophy 9 That Exile is not an Evil 10 Will the Philosopher Prosecute Anyone for Personal Injury 11 What means of Livelihood is Appropriate for a Philosopher 12 On Sexual Indulgence 13 What is the Chief End of Marriage 14 Is Marriage a Handicap for the Pursuit of Philosophy 15 Should Every Child that is Born be Raised 16 Must One Obey One s Parents under all Circumstances 17 What is the Best Viaticum for Old Age 18 On Food 19 On Clothing and Shelter 20 On Furnishings 21 On Cutting the Hair

    • Best Read [Musonius Rufus] ê Lectures and Fragments || [Science Book] PDF ↠
      311 Musonius Rufus
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Musonius Rufus] ê Lectures and Fragments || [Science Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Musonius Rufus
      Published :2018-05-06T18:36:02+00:00

    1 thought on “Lectures and Fragments”

    1. Apparently he's one of the four great Roman stoics who taught Epictetus and presumably taught in Latin, not Greek, since he makes a pun in Latin. Like Socrates and Epictetus, he didn't himself write anything. He's surprisingly egalitarian, even feminist but in toto his philosophy is a bit negative, inhibited; you wouldn't think there was anything positive about goodness: it's all curbed by 'reason'. It's probably appropriate to living under absolutism. It's curiously anticipant of Xian thinking, [...]

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