Charles G. Finney: An Autobiography

Charles G Finney An Autobiography This is the unabridged Autobiography of Charles Finney a revivalist and leader of the second Great Awakening in America After becoming a lawyer he carefully explored the claims of Jesus and was conv

  • Title: Charles G. Finney: An Autobiography
  • Author: Charles Grandison Finney
  • ISBN: 9781517290627
  • Page: 179
  • Format: Paperback
  • This is the unabridged Autobiography of Charles Finney, a revivalist and leader of the second Great Awakening in America After becoming a lawyer, he carefully explored the claims of Jesus and was converted in 1821 He began to preach throughout America and changed the course of a nation with the fires of revival.May his story inspire you to reach your nation for Jesus ChrThis is the unabridged Autobiography of Charles Finney, a revivalist and leader of the second Great Awakening in America After becoming a lawyer, he carefully explored the claims of Jesus and was converted in 1821 He began to preach throughout America and changed the course of a nation with the fires of revival.May his story inspire you to reach your nation for Jesus Christ and ignite revival in this hour.Get books REVIVALPRESS

    Charles Grandison Finney Britannica Charles Grandison Finney Charles Grandison Finney, American lawyer, president of Oberlin College, and a central figure in the religious revival movement of the early Charles Charles is a masculine given name from the French form Charles of a Germanic name Karl The original Anglo Saxon was earl or eorl, as the name of King Cearl of

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      Published :2018-07-09T16:18:44+00:00

    1 thought on “Charles G. Finney: An Autobiography”

    1. "God never laid it upon thee to convert those he sends thee to. No; to publish the gospel is thy duty."William Gurnall (1616-1679) in Puritan Theology, pg 970Finney contradicts this at every point of his ministry, and by his own account.Finney was against hyper-Calvinism, that only God can regenerate the heart. (This was and is standard Calvinism, not an aberrant hyper-version of Calvin.) WE should decide to obey Christ, and that will change heart. We can make a new heart for ourselves, since we [...]

    2. I read this mainly for the purpose of pleasing a friend and gathering discernment. There was much to cringe at and yet also much to apply. It's easy to lump people into categories but this was a challenge in my discernment between truth and lie. Finney's impact on the Church has been substantial making the read worth my time.

    3. I found that many of the stereotypes concerning Finney are unwarranted. I found this abridged version to be a delightful testimony of a man greatly used by God. We do not have to agree with someone to learn from them. Many souls were brought into the Kingdom through Finney's obedience. This is that story.

    4. Of all the wondrous ways in which God moved in this account, what emerges foremost is that He longs to do it again, and even more so for our lost and wayward generation.That the fear of God would fall on people and cause such deep repentance… that entire cities and regions would be swept with revivalat the anointing was so strong Finney could walk into a Rochester factory and see people repent at their machinesl this should inspire the church today to contend for the same outpouring and expect [...]

    5. In my branch of Evangelicalism, Charles Finney comes close to being the devil. He is clearly semi-Pelagian. His conviction was that man was not so totally fallen that he had lost the ability to be recognize and choose the good. This spilled out into his views on the atonement. But I need to hear Finney speak for himself. He did consider himself an Edwardsean. And it is true that Edwards did have a more optimistic anthropology that allowed for a conversionism apart from the usual means of grace, [...]

    6. i have to give this book 5 stars because it runs on a "re-read" rotation. i am not sure how many times i have read the book - but i enjoy it each time and see it with both new eyes and the welcoming eyes of a familiar friendnney is the source (at least the greatest source) of the govermental theory of the atonement - pure trouble and bad theology through and through. yet, that has never detracted from my enjoyment and learning experienced in reading this auto-biography. finney applied a lawyer's [...]

    7. Charles Finney is a rough writer. His language is unpolished and often plain old uneducated. I am reading this book on the heels of reading the autobiography of Benjamin Franklin who was very driven and self-educated. Franklin was also very arrogant and thought very well of himself, often blind to his own immorality. Finney remained uneducated intentionally. He did not want to be learned, polished, or suave. He wanted to obey the voice of his creator at all costs. So, the beauty of his story is [...]

    8. The evangelist must produce excitements sufficient to induce people to repentance.Thus wrote the controversial Charles G. Finney, one of the most influential men in American church history. He is credited with developing a new method for evangelism and with over half a million ‘decisions for Christ’. On the other hand, some point out that the region he worked in has become a ‘spiritual wasteland’ and suggest that is because of the emotionalism and theology of his approach.One way for our [...]

    9. Universalism is the belief that all persons will ultimately receive salvation from God. Mr. Finney was against this. Unitarianism is the belief that God is one. Mr. Finney was against this. It appears that everyone from Illinois to Massachusetts were sinful backsliders until Mr. Finney brought his revival to them. They became agitated, cryed, swooned and fainted. Some who opposed him fell dead. Anyhow, this book and the other book I'm reading on slave religion has me wondering exactly when was t [...]

    10. "I went here, I went there. I did this, I did that." That pretty much sums it up. Best to stay away from Finney. Reading John Bunyan's "Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners" is a million times more profitable.

    11. Finney has had a profound impact upon western Christianity, too bad most of his influence has been destructive. He was a heretic. And from reading this book, I think he may have been disturbed mentally. Perhaps the most troubling part was his account of the night he was converted.

    12. Finney was a scary man, and very intense. At times, this book made me angry. At other times, I was impressed by his passion and devotion. I am certainly better for having read it.

    13. It was so wonderful reading about the way churches used to be and how strong ministers were. They didn't worry about stepping on toes, they wanted salvations!

    14. I loved this book. I found so many details that helped me understand the man. I have seen mixed reviews but I thought it very interesting.

    15. Totally boring writing style but this book gave me encouragement to finally step out in Open-Air Preaching. If God can do it through him, He can do it through you! :-)

    16. Totally boring writing style but this book gave me encouragement to finally step out in Open-Air Preaching. If God can do it through him, He can do it through you! :-)

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