The Truth About Employee Engagement: A Fable About Addressing the Three Root Causes of Job Misery (J-B Lencioni Series)

The Truth About Employee Engagement A Fable About Addressing the Three Root Causes of Job Misery J B Lencioni Series The Truth About Employee Engagement was originally published as The Three Signs of a Miserable Job A bestselling author and business guru tells how to improve job satisfaction and performance In his s

  • Title: The Truth About Employee Engagement: A Fable About Addressing the Three Root Causes of Job Misery (J-B Lencioni Series)
  • Author: Patrick Lencioni
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 142
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Truth About Employee Engagement was originally published as The Three Signs of a Miserable Job A bestselling author and business guru tells how to improve job satisfaction and performance In his sixth fable, bestselling author Patrick Lencioni takes on a topic that almost everyone can relate to job misery Millions of workers, even those who have carefully chosen cThe Truth About Employee Engagement was originally published as The Three Signs of a Miserable Job A bestselling author and business guru tells how to improve job satisfaction and performance In his sixth fable, bestselling author Patrick Lencioni takes on a topic that almost everyone can relate to job misery Millions of workers, even those who have carefully chosen careers based on true passions and interests, dread going to work, suffering each day as they trudge to jobs that make them cynical, weary, and frustrated It is a simple fact of business life that any job, from investment banker to dishwasher, can become miserable Through the story of a CEO turned pizzeria manager, Lencioni reveals the three elements that make work miserable irrelevance, immeasurability, and anonymity and gives managers and their employees the keys to make any job engaging As with all of Lencioni s books, this one is filled with actionable advice you can put into effect immediately In addition to the fable, the book includes a detailed model examining the three root causes of job misery and how they can be remedied It covers the benefits of managing for job engagement within organizations increased productivity, greater retention, and competitive advantage and offers examples of how managers can use the applications in the book to deal with specific jobs and situations Patrick Lencioni is President of The Table Group, a management consulting firm specializing in executive team development and organizational health As a consultant and keynote speaker, he has worked with thousands of senior executives and executive teams in organizations ranging from Fortune 500 companies to high tech startups to universities and nonprofits His clients include ATT, Direct TV, JCPenney, Microsoft, Nestle, Northwestern Mutual, Southwest Airlines and St Jude Chilren s Research Hospital Lencioni is the author of ten bestselling books, including The Five Dysfunctions of a Team and The Advantage He previously worked for Oracle, Sybase, and the management consulting firm Bain Company.

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    1 thought on “The Truth About Employee Engagement: A Fable About Addressing the Three Root Causes of Job Misery (J-B Lencioni Series)”

    1. How I wish I could mail this to almost every boss I've had. The largest part is taken up by a fable which illustrates the ideas of the book, while the second part goes into more detail on how to implement the ideas and what they really mean. The three signs are:1. Anonymity2. Irrelevance3. Immeasurement1. AnonymityAll human beings need to be understood and appreciated for their unique qualities by someone in a position of authority. People who see themselves as invisible, generic, or anonymous c [...]

    2. We are using this book in a leadership team meeting this fall to promote discussion among company leaders about their role in employee satisfaction, and eventually, the bottom line. This is a quick read -- set up as the "fable" of Brian Bailey - a skilled, natural manager who rises to the top and understands people at all levels. As a young leader, Brian takes a small exercise equipment company from mediocre performance to the top of the industry. However, when he's forced to sell the company, h [...]

    3. Having just taken a position that oversees a team, I knew intrinsic motivation would be key for each of them to experience a successful outcome. As such, I took to heart the recommendation to read this book (among others). While reading is enjoyable for me, I was surprised with my swallowing this book whole within 24 hours, post-it notes being scribbled as I went through, accidentally identifying the first two signs before I knew that that they were the official signposts to turning around miser [...]

    4. Not a particularly compelling narrator, but I enjoyed this. Mostly I just wanted an entire novel on the people in the restaurant, but I understand that the book had different goals in mind :DDefinitely some good stuff in here, and practical advice, though occasionally unrealistic approaches.

    5. Another good Lencioni read. Sometimes I listen to these books, and at the very end hear the original publication dates and try to think back to where I was when the book was written, and wonder how things might be different had I read it then instead of now (a decade later). Books like this one might have changed a lot of things, but at the same time, it is possible I just wouldn't have gotten the message back then.The TL;DR of the book is your employees want to know you care, want to know what [...]

    6. Enjoyed this short read about employee fulfillment or the lack thereof. Lencioni's model is very similar to the Self-determination theory model (Autonomy - Control of your time, Competence - refers to mastery of unambiguously useful things, and relatedness - the feeling of connection to others.) but replaces autonomy by essentially splitting relatedness into two parts 1) being known and 2) relevance. AnonymityPeople cannot be fulfilled in their work if they are not known. All human beings need t [...]

    7. I wasn't expecting to like this book as much as I did. It's a book on business management principles, but written as a story with fictional characters. Once I got over the fact that it's just a story and not literature, I liked it more. It was easier to read than straight-up theory. Best part is that the message of the book is fundamentally to treat your employees like human beings: know them, remind them how they matter, and help them to figure out how to measure their growth.

    8. In his sixth fable, bestselling author Patrick Lencioni takes on a topic that almost everyone can relate to: the causes of a miserable job. Millions of workers, even those who have carefully chosen careers based on true passions and interests, dread going to work, suffering each day as they trudge to jobs that make them cynical, weary, and frustrated. It is a simple fact of business life that any job, from investment banker to dishwasher, can become miserable. Through the story of a CEO turned p [...]

    9. I didn't read this book to find out if I have a miserable job. I read it to find out if the people I supervise have one. This book is clearly written for managers, etc. even though it claims to be useful for other employees. The moral for non-supervisors: try to not work at a miserable job!This was my first Lencioni book and I was pretty surprised. You could fit the practical content onto about 15 pages or so. The rest of the book is a story, which serves as an extended parable demonstrating the [...]

    10. The fable behind this book was actually very enjoyable and made it stand out for me from other leadership and management books. I always said you can't teach people to care about their jobs, but this book has me questioning that phrase. I think it is very interesting and really liked reading the examples and practical breakdowns at the end of the book after the fable. I think this book would benefit managers more than employees, because employees might just get frustrated at their inability to c [...]

    11. As a big Lencioni fan, I'm not sure how I missed this one from almost 10 years ago. Another fable with some great points about employee engagement. Simple, but not easy, reminders to help employees see the meaning in their work, give them measurable things to work on, and get to know and care about them as people.

    12. "That's been one of my mantras - focus and simplicity. Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it's worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains." Steve JobsThe three root causes of job misery are at first glance obvious and seemingly easy to resolve. And yet they remain largely unaddressed in most organizationsONYMITYPeople cannot be fulfilled in their work if they are not known. All human beings need t [...]

    13. I was reading the Pdf version of this book on my office computer whenever my table was clear or when I had few commitments and meetings to attend. As a result it took me longer than usual to finish it - something I'm glad I did. I don't think my boss will be to upset with me seeing that I was improving my management or should I say people skills. After all, our organization is a learning organization #wink There are a number of reasons why corporate people will lampoon this fable. The following [...]

    14. A self-help book for managers and employees. The book uses three identifiable ways to make managers better bosses by helping employees enjoy their job more.This 250+ page book is written in two parts. The first part is a fictional narrative that follows the life and career of a manager who believes that having people enjoy their job makes a company better. The second part is a text book style analysis of the three steps outlined in the book. I found it kind of odd that the fable part of this boo [...]

    15. There are some good takeaways and overall the story was good, but it was just too over the top for my personal taste. When I read non-fiction and books I like the anecdotes and stories that help reinforce the message the author is trying to relay, but generally prefer that they are a condensed version. This book read more like a novel than a book about being a better manager. Towards the end of each chapter there was always a moment where the story was being built up or bridged towards the next [...]

    16. Well, first, the new title of the book, "The Truth About Employee Engagement" is a better title. Secondly, I thought it was a good book. I've been a fan of Patrick Lencioni's books and his style of teaching for awhile now. And while I loved "The Ideal Team Player," and some of his other titles, I thought this book was good, but not great.The story/fable didn't quite grab ahold of me like other ones have, and I would have liked a little more depth in exploring the three causes of unhappiness with [...]

    17. Книга очень необычная, потому что большей частью она художественная! Но не вся! И от этого читать ее непривычно! Сначала идёт длинный рассказ о пожилом топ-менеджере, разработавшем принципы увеличения вовлечённости персонала. Этот персонаж, Брайан, с успехом применяет их в [...]

    18. This book had me thinking for months. I first heard Patrick Lencioni at the Willow Creek Global Leadership Summit, an energetic and engaging speaker. Just about everyone can relate to a miserable job. Three Signs tells the story of Brian, a CEO that leaves his high-paying job and becomes the manager at a small Colorado pizzeria filled with grumpy and disinterested employees. The employees are miserable, and Brian makes it his mission to figure out why. He investigates the three miseries of irrel [...]

    19. This was an easy read, but an engaging one. The "three signs" of a miserable job are anonymity, irrelevance, and immeasurability. People need to know they are important and that the work they do matters. While the book is geared towards people who manager others and the premises are simple and direct (be kind to people!), it was pretty thought-provoking for me. I found myself examining my own career and asking if it was as fulfilling as it could be. There was a tone to the book that I really app [...]

    20. No estoy totalmente convencido sobre si el formato de "fábula" que tiene este libro es lo mejor para mi. En momentos disfruté de la historia y en otros trataba de avanzar lo más rápido porque se me hacia aburrido. El autor va explicar 3 cosas que hacen cualquier trabajo miserable: anonimato, irrelevancia y ausencia de métricas. Cuando uno lee a lo que se refiere cada una descubre que es bastante obvio, pero como él mismo afirma, al ser así tienden a ignorarse. El objetivo es regresar a es [...]

    21. Big thanks to my boss for passing this book my way as I start a new role as a supervisor! The ideas in this book are so simple, yet so many miss it and I see the consequences all around me. I look forward to not only using these things for myself personally but to better my ability as a leader. People are people and should never been treated as mere resources. I recommend this for anyone in a leadership role, or to anyone currently miserable in your job. Perhaps it will help shed light on why pe [...]

    22. I have read several of Lencioni's book and have never been disappointed. He is a great writer and I can usually read his books in a couple of days. This is a timely book for me on employee engagement as I currently am assessing that as I oversee some staff. Lencioni gives three reasons why employess are not engaged: anonymity, irrelevance, and immeasurement. If you are looking for a practical book to help increase employee engagement, this offers great instruction. This week I can begin to apply [...]

    23. According to Patrick Lencioni, the three root causes of job misery are anonymity, irrelevance, and "immeasurement." I agree that managers need to get to know their staffs on a somewhat personal level, make sure that they understand the value of their work, and give staff ways to measure their own progress. However, I think that employees also have to have some degree of interest in and commitment to the work they do. It has to work both ways to avoid misery on the job.

    24. As usual Patrick Lencioni took an extremely complex topic, employee engagement, and broke it down into bite-sized easily digestible building blocks. His writing style and character development draw the reader in and make it nearly impossible to put the book down after you start it. His business fables may be the most effective and relatable way to deliver actionable business advice. I love his work and encourage everyone to check out his books.

    25. I was given this to read at work. The fable was surprisingly well written for a fictional story meant to sell you on this management style. I can say I agree with most of what this guy is saying about employee satisfaction but I also think it oversimplifies some problems and doesn't take into account that a lot of companies' upper management doesn't have your back or allow you to change whatever you want.

    26. Great for inspiring leaders!I chose this book because I feel that everything written by this author is so applicable to my job. I work at a university and hope to move into leadership some day.

    27. I think this is Patrick Lencioni at his best. I wasn’t sure of his idea of packaging a “ridiculously simple and obvious” remedy in a fable. But the process of fable, theory, case studies, practical steps and then closing reflection works very well in the deep processing of the concept.

    28. This author with his fables is not my favorite. Pedantic as he beats his point into your head. Much like the 3 am emails from a boss. I do agree with his reasoning for what people want from their job.

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