Suicide Squad, Volume 4: The Janus Directive

Suicide Squad Volume The Janus Directive The Suicide Squad has always been held in check by their leader Amanda Waller But it becomes clear that Waller is sending her agents on missions in the pursuit of her own private agenda called The Jan

  • Title: Suicide Squad, Volume 4: The Janus Directive
  • Author: John Ostrander Kim Yale Pablo Marcos DougRice Tom Mandrake Rafael Kayanan Paul Kupperberg Cary Bates
  • ISBN: 9781401262617
  • Page: 289
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Suicide Squad has always been held in check by their leader Amanda Waller But it becomes clear that Waller is sending her agents on missions in the pursuit of her own private agenda called The Janus Directive Soon other governments and super villain teams become involved and all out chaos errupts Who controls the one who controls the super villains Collecting CheckThe Suicide Squad has always been held in check by their leader Amanda Waller But it becomes clear that Waller is sending her agents on missions in the pursuit of her own private agenda called The Janus Directive Soon other governments and super villain teams become involved and all out chaos errupts Who controls the one who controls the super villains Collecting Checkmate 15 18, Suicide Squad 27 30, Manhunter 14, Firestorm 86, Captain Atom 30

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      289 John Ostrander Kim Yale Pablo Marcos DougRice Tom Mandrake Rafael Kayanan Paul Kupperberg Cary Bates
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      Posted by:John Ostrander Kim Yale Pablo Marcos DougRice Tom Mandrake Rafael Kayanan Paul Kupperberg Cary Bates
      Published :2018-09-04T17:33:58+00:00

    1 thought on “Suicide Squad, Volume 4: The Janus Directive”

    1. This is the first of these Suicide Squad trades I didn't really like. I think that's because it didn't feel like a Suicide Squad book. The Janus Directive was a crossover mainly between Checkmate and Suicide Squad but it does drop into Firestorm, Captain Atom, and Manhunter as well. There's a war between the different intelligence agencies for some reason that isn't really clear. The story doesn't make a lot of sense until after the true villain is revealed. Once they go after him the story gets [...]

    2. The Janus Directive was never my favorite storyline and reading it again all these years later hasn't changed my opinion. It's too long and some issues didn't really tie into the story. I did really like the Firestorm issue, but it didn't need to be here. On the plus side, Karl Kesel really shines on the art side and he and new SS layout artist John K. Snyder really mesh by #30. Looking forward to just getting back to the Squad in the next trade.

    3. The fourth volume of John Ostrander's revival of "Suicide Squad" collects "The Janus Directive," a crossover with forgettable late eighties titles including "Checkmate," "Manhunter," "Captain Atom," and "Firestorm." Not only is the cast a real "Who's Not" of DC in the eighties, but branded as a "Suicide Squad" collection this book fails to give us the characters and scenarios we love from that series. Although mainstays like Amanda Waller and Captain Boomerang are present (and that's the most th [...]

    4. I got a little lost on this one. This crossover pits all the metahuman agencies against each other, while a mystery villain pulls the strings for sinister ends. This book is overlong, perhaps because issues are collected for the completionist's sake rather than their full relevance to the story (some only feature a page or two of the main plot). Worse yet, the Suicide Squad itself barely appears in this book! Not really skippable, though, as I imagine Waller's new position at volume's end will b [...]

    5. Crossovers rarely succeed and this is no different. The issues of Checkmate are a little painful and it's a shame that the regular Suicide Squad comic got sidetracked for this.

    6. The first story in this volume is really a coda to the plots of volume 3, and that's a darned shame because it's a strong story that loses a lot of its dramatic impact by being separated from the goings-on in Washington that occurred previously. This story (Suicide Squad #26) is only in this volume for one panel (that'd be page 4, panel 6), which is a setup to the Janus Directive, and I think that was the wrong choice.As for the Janus Directive itself: it's got a superb foundation. It's about th [...]

    7. So now the classic Suicide Squad collections get to the mega-crossover, "The Janus Directive." Although there's a lot less focus on the Suicide Squad this time around, it's interesting to see this "moment in time" for DC comics, filled with '80s espionage groups and characters like Black Thorn and Manhunter and Valentina Vostok who have passed into obscurity. Although the storyline itself is a little goofy (someone pits all of the covert government agencies against each other in a "shoot first, [...]

    8. Summary: Waller's Task Force X is not the only covert government agency operating. When new of the Janus Directive gets out, Waller quickly learns her agency is not alone. Waller will do anything to keep her metahumans alive.The battle is just starting, Who will survive? and Who will not? Characters: Amanda Waller, Bronze Tiger, Vixen, Kobra, black adders, Captain Atom, Nightshade, Boomerang, Manhunter, etc.Final Thoughts:It's all about the Ninjas. Volume 4 is about more than the Suicide Squad, [...]

    9. Really like this series but because this book includes a multi-series arc you are left a little lost as to who some of the other characters are. I would have liked some context for the other included issues (esp Checkmate as I'd never heard of it before). Also the main villain and plot were a blatant knock off of GI Joe!?!?!

    10. Public library copy. A mixed bag what with different talent in rotation telling a crossover story. This volume was especially uninteresting due to squad roster of characters. I like the original Captain Atom character just fine, but when he's the best or most recognizable character then of course this team won't be as interesting as what came before.

    11. Good but not quite as good as the first three volumes. Mainly for the fact that it is a crossover story and there were different people writing it. Still worth it to read as the first story in it has a wrap up of things from the previous volume.

    12. A jumbled mess without much Suicide Squad. I still don't see who was double crossing who, and after ten chapters it just kinda ends. Not Ostrander's best.

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