The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Fighting the Big Motherfuckin' Sad

The Do It Yourself Guide to Fighting the Big Motherfuckin Sad Self described as an anti depression guide guide to a freer lawless life Gnade s book looks at the root causes of sadness anxiety and general malaise boredom and offers helpful point by point sugge

  • Title: The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Fighting the Big Motherfuckin' Sad
  • Author: Adam Gnade
  • ISBN: 1939899214
  • Page: 384
  • Format: Paperback
  • Self described as an anti depression guide guide to a freer, lawless life Gnade s book looks at the root causes of sadness, anxiety, and general malaise boredom and offers helpful point by point suggestions in list form and short essay pep talks on how to move beyond your demons for a better, smarter, happier life Like a letter from a trusted friend in the trencSelf described as an anti depression guide guide to a freer, lawless life Gnade s book looks at the root causes of sadness, anxiety, and general malaise boredom and offers helpful point by point suggestions in list form and short essay pep talks on how to move beyond your demons for a better, smarter, happier life Like a letter from a trusted friend in the trenches, The Do It Yourself Guide to Fighting the Big Motherfuckin Sad will work with you through all phases of your life, thick and thin 1 Bestseller for 2013, 2014 and 2015 in the Small Press section of Powell s Books, the largest independent book retailer in the world.Now in its 6th printing in three years.

    • [PDF] è Unlimited ☆ The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Fighting the Big Motherfuckin' Sad : by Adam Gnade ✓
      384 Adam Gnade
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] è Unlimited ☆ The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Fighting the Big Motherfuckin' Sad : by Adam Gnade ✓
      Posted by:Adam Gnade
      Published :2018-08-15T19:57:28+00:00

    1 thought on “The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Fighting the Big Motherfuckin' Sad”

    1. I found myself at the Portland Zine Symposium yesterday, talking with other very fervent, very impassioned, creators and wandering from table to table, each awash in the fruits of some erstwhile thinker's labor of love. I'd traded away every copy of my own zine by the time I hit the Pioneer Press table and had to break my budget and plunk down actual cash for this tiny little tract. The brilliant cover drew me in, but flipping through it I knew that it needed to come home with me because it feat [...]

    2. "Everyone good is necessary." --Adam Gnade (the author)I bought this at a bookstore while passing through Asheville, NC as a souvenir for my boyfriend (not because he's "motherfuckin' sad" but because I love supporting people who publish zines and thought it might be a motivating source for winter reading, for both of us). It's a quick read- 60 mini pages- but filled with so many vigorous head-nodding statements, that I turned to Jer when I finished it (he hasn't read it yet), and said, "You kno [...]

    3. I didn't read this as a way to try to fix my depression (the big motherfuckin sad). I just read it. I saw a friend had listed it on and I bought it. And read it. While I don't think this would actually be able to help cure depression. I don't think that's what it's about. It's just about life. How it's good and how it's shitty. And how it's basically what you want it to be. How you can be happy doing what you're doing. And if you're not happy doing what you're doing maybe you should try doing s [...]

    4. I couldn't have read this on a crappier day, Adam gnade saved me from the big motherfuckin' sad today. I loved it. I'm ordering more to give as gifts.

    5. I came across this fierce sliver of wisdom in Asheville's Downtown Books & News. It was perched beside hand-stapled zines of anarchy and rebellion, furious shouts for freedom alongside transgendered musings and short stories scribbled in pen. I am so over self-help books, but this tongue-in-cheek Do-It Yourself Guide is more a philosophical framework, a world-view than anything else. Here's a taste:FIGHT EVERY DAYFight the critics. Fight the bank. Fight your creditors. Fight dismissiveness. [...]

    6. I wanted to love this. Like the reviewers did. I needed to love it. Parts of it were good, especially the advice about the internet and the haters. But, overall, parts of it made me more sad. You can tell the demographics of the person who wrote this book. I don't mean that in a bad way. I am glad this book helped many people, probably of similar demographics. Queer, disabled, sick, no car, lack of a support system? A lot of this shit won't be possible. And while I appreciated the part on how no [...]

    7. Many things in this book seemed like "no duh," answers. At first. But after a second read, I realized that there were lots of things in here I needed to be reminded of. I enjoyed the list-style writing throughout most of the book. What I would have enjoyed more of is his little story parts that discuss his coming to these ideas. Overall, if you are feeling kind of alone and need some straight-shooter advice on getting out of a slump - this is a great, inexpensive little book for you.

    8. A labor of love and starts strong, then gets yelly. And vague in a passive aggressive way, that makes you like wait, what was the beef this guy had with some internet haters?

    9. “I’m all for believing in what we do. I believe in work and self-seriousness and the quiet power of confidence and resolve. I believe in pushing for the thing you love until the fucking doors creak and break and smash inward with a great cloud of splinters and dust. But you need to know when to step back and have a laugh at your own expense and lose your driven fucking attitude for a while. A little pressure let off is a good thing. Taking yourself too seriously for too long will have the op [...]

    10. In case of emergency, open zine.This compact guide to DIY depression-busting is big on lists, self-compassion, and the importance of both independence and inter-dependence to mental and emotional wellness. It also says "fuck" a lot. Not a complaint. In fact, the tough-love vibe of this book may very well be the thing that appeals to people for whom normcore mental health solutions are either unappealing or unaffordable. Not meant as a substitute for meds or therapy, this tiny volume is more like [...]

    11. I bought myself an e-copy, but I will be buying a hard copy for myself and for a bunch of friends because it's the kind of book I want them to read, not just because it's an excellent read but because I want them to know that I care and that they are good people in a world that can be very, very hard and I appreciate every single time they ring me and say 'let's do something'. this is, in a way, my ringing them; my doing something.

    12. I read this slowly over a couple of months just a few pages at a time. It seemed like I picked up every part just when I needed to hear it. This had me cracking up and tearing up (sometimes at the same moment). I saw this recommended on a "top something or other of the year" books, and it was worth every penny. It's not Prozac, but it's sometimes a gentle hug, kick, or laugh you need.

    13. Extremely specific in places (we can't all just quit our jobs and live on a farm, dude), but with enough universality that I considered buying this slim volume in bulk and just leaving them around town for people to find when they're feeling shitty. I'll probably just keep this on my bedside table for those days when I need it.

    14. This is a must have for everyone who struggles with anxiety and depression. I keep it at my bed side to have easy access to. I find myself regularly skimming through it.Gnade's writing is creative and inspiring.

    15. Lots of good nuggets of wisdom in here. Gnade is a scrappy city boy who lives in Kansas now, while becoming one with open spaces and open hearts and punk-like idealism. "One Thing I've Learned From the Farmers Around Here: Some things make you stronger. Some just make you old."

    16. Adam Gnade talks through his own struggles with depression, anxiety, and antidepressants, while giving advice to his readers. A quick, yet powerful and important read.

    17. Reads like a letter the author wrote to himself when he was feeling depressed. I could relate to some of it but other times I had no idea what he was talking about.

    18. I am reading this during a time when I don't feel especially depressed. & I suspect that I'd react differently to this book if it was reaching me during a more acute time of feeling down. Lots of the advice here is "fight back!" and for me, that's the thing I feel like I cannot do when I am Motherfucking Sad. The fighting feeling is usually one of the first signs of recovery, but I can't always access it.I'm going to type out the things that stood out for me that I'd like to consider more, a [...]

    19. In the moments when life sucks, and life sucks a lot, tell yourself about the things that don't suck. This book is not an instruction manual, despite the title, but ideas about how one dude fights the bads. It might give you some ideas when you are feeling those bads yourself.

    20. I wish everyone I know who has committed suicide had read this book because maybe it would have gotten through to them, and they'd still be here today.

    21. The thing I liked most about this book is that it felt like it was coming from a place of understanding, but that expression was spread throughout the book as opposed to being a big, fat chapter upfront. That’s a thing I see in lots of self-help books. The writer has to spend a lot of calories convincing me that they’re the right person for me to listen to. This book convinces me, but not all up top. Which is cool.It’s also a really short book. Which is good. I get the advice, get in, get [...]

    22. A pocket-sized, down-to-Earth guide by someone who has been there. You can look at the book as a bunch of platitudes, but if you look closer, it is more than that -- it is the voice of a friend who knows just what you're going through whispering in your ear. Friendly reminders like suicide ends the pain, but what good is that going to do you, you can't enjoy it because you're dead (paraphrasing). It's a book I'd give to any of my friends struggling with depression so that in the times I can't be [...]

    23. When it comes to emotional density, this slim zine packs more into its fifty-something pages than most books many times its size. It's both a personal manifesto and community rallying cry--for creative endeavors, for relationships, for activism, for life. The points Gnade makes here aren't especially new, but sometimes you need a reminder. And if that's the case, it should be one that's as uncomfortably intimate and hot-blooded as this one.

    24. A great little pro-mental health, DIY/punk-inspired pep talk from someone who's clearly Been There. I enjoyed the authenticity and general voice of the writing; others have pointed out some failings vis-a-vis intersectionality and I admit that I blanched at the "noble savage" line (dude, you don't get to say that). Still, I will most definitely return to it on days when I need to hear these vitally important reminders of what it actually means to work through anxiety, depression, anger, et al.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *