Walls Come Tumbling Down: The Music and Politics of Rock Against Racism, 2 Tone and Red Wedge

Walls Come Tumbling Down The Music and Politics of Rock Against Racism Tone and Red Wedge In August Eric Clapton made an inflammatory speech in support of Enoch Powell and black repatriation sparking an anti racism campaign that would soon radicalise an entire generation The followi

  • Title: Walls Come Tumbling Down: The Music and Politics of Rock Against Racism, 2 Tone and Red Wedge
  • Author: Daniel Rachel
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 337
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • In August 1976, Eric Clapton made an inflammatory speech in support of Enoch Powell and black repatriation, sparking an anti racism campaign that would soon radicalise an entire generation The following sixteen years saw politics and pop music come together as never before to challenge racism, gender inequality and social and class divisions For the first time in UK hiIn August 1976, Eric Clapton made an inflammatory speech in support of Enoch Powell and black repatriation, sparking an anti racism campaign that would soon radicalise an entire generation The following sixteen years saw politics and pop music come together as never before to challenge racism, gender inequality and social and class divisions For the first time in UK history, musicians became instigators of social change and their political persuasion as important as the songs they sang.Through the voices of campaigners, musicians, artists and politicians, Daniel Rachel charts this extraordinary and pivotal period between 1976 and 1992, following the rise and fall of three key movements of the time Rock Against Racism, 2 Tone and Red Wedge, revealing how they both shaped, and were shaped by, the music of a generation.Consisting of new and exclusive in depth conversations with over 100 contributors, including Pauline Black, Billy Bragg, Jerry Dammers, Phill Jupitus, Neil Kinnock, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Tom Robinson, Clare Short, Tracey Thorn and many , Walls Come Tumbling Down is a fascinating, polyphonic and authoritative account of those crucial sixteen years in Britain s history, from the acclaimed writer of Isle of Noises.Walls Come Tumbling Down also features than 150 images many rare or previously unpublished from some of the greatest names in photography, including Adrian Boot, Chalkie Davies, Jill Furmanovsky, Syd Shelton, Pennie Smith, Steve Rapport and Virginia Turbett.

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      Published :2018-011-03T21:47:14+00:00

    1 thought on “Walls Come Tumbling Down: The Music and Politics of Rock Against Racism, 2 Tone and Red Wedge”

    1. Exhaustively researched absorbing account of the alternative 80s. Some of my preconceptions confirmed, eg Tom Robinson's a good guy and The Clash were sloganisers, and some revised- felt better towards Paul Weller. However, I didn't buy the Red Wedge era records at the time and spent the 80s listening to The Fall; for all the good intentions, is there a taint of sanctimoniousness about the enterprise?

    2. I've always been a sucker for protest songs. Greenpeace, Artists Against Apartheid, Amnesty International, etc if there's an album I probably have it and likely the DVD too. So when this oral history of Rock Against Racism, Red Wedge and Artists United Against Apartheid came out I figured it was written for me. The voices of some of my favorite artists, The Style Council, UB40, Paul Weller, Billy Bragg are the ones telling the stories of the protest efforts in the late 70's up through the early [...]

    3. The very first march I went on was from Trafalgar Square to Victoria Park for the ANL Carnival. As a school boy it also happened to be one of my first consciously political arguments when the five of us debated on the train from Hampshire suburbia to Waterloo whether we should go straight to the park so we would be sure to catch X Ray Spex or do the march. Me and one other mate did the march. Despite getting to an age where I forget where I put my coffee, I remember so much of that day. (It was [...]

    4. Fascinating and very revealing. I was 17 in 1979 and lucky enough to see The Specials, Madness, The Selecter, The Beat and UB40 live. When I listen to their music today, the feeling that I was hearing something unique and amazing is as strong as it was back then. So, reading about the Two Tone years from those involved made me feel very nostalgic. I'm glad I didn't know back then about all the in-fighting that was going on, though. The contributors to this book don't hold back!It was interesting [...]

    5. We were there but mostly for the music. Sure, we hated racism and racists because it was so pointless and stupid but I had no clue what was going on in the background so this book was a great eye opener for me. I'm proud to have supported RAR and have had that experience of marching and 'doing something'. It laid the foundation for a life of activism and awareness and I'm proud to have been a part of it.

    6. I have a lot of love and nostalgia for this era. These were my formative years and when I fell in love with music. It was a time when a lot of British music and politics came together to challenge racism, inequality and social/class divisions. Daniel Rachel chronicles Rock Against Racism, 2 Tone and Red Wedge from the points of view of the musicians involved. I found the oral history style of writing a bit disjointed. It just felt like it needed editing. I would have preferred a narrative accoun [...]

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