The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity (Norton History of Science)

The Greatest Benefit to Mankind A Medical History of Humanity Norton History of Science To combine enormous knowledge with a delightful style and a highly idiosyncratic point of view is Roy Porter s special gift and it makes this book alive and fascinating and provocative on every page

  • Title: The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity (Norton History of Science)
  • Author: Roy Porter
  • ISBN: 9780393319804
  • Page: 444
  • Format: Paperback
  • To combine enormous knowledge with a delightful style and a highly idiosyncratic point of view is Roy Porter s special gift, and it makes this book alive and fascinating and provocative on every page Oliver Sacks, M.D.Porter s charting of the history of medicine affords readers the opportunity as never before to assess its culture and science and its costs and b To combine enormous knowledge with a delightful style and a highly idiosyncratic point of view is Roy Porter s special gift, and it makes this book alive and fascinating and provocative on every page Oliver Sacks, M.D.Porter s charting of the history of medicine affords readers the opportunity as never before to assess its culture and science and its costs and benefits to humankind A splendid and thoroughly engrossing book L.A Times of illustrations.

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    • Best Download [Roy Porter] ↠ The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity (Norton History of Science) || [Children's Book] PDF ✓
      444 Roy Porter
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Roy Porter] ↠ The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity (Norton History of Science) || [Children's Book] PDF ✓
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      Published :2018-09-17T01:02:47+00:00

    1 thought on “The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity (Norton History of Science)”

    1. Smallpox patient, Bangladesh, 1973The defects of this book are many, but it would hurt to give it less than four stars and, the avoidance of pain being one of Porter's main themes, I will stick to a suitably thematic rating. There are delights aplenty to be mined in this compendious history, and a myriad reasons, if you still needed any, to fall down on your knees and give thanks that we live in an age of anaesthetic and antibiotics.Things have certainly come a long way since – to pick an exam [...]

    2. 3.5 stars. So this was actually my textbook for a subject called Pox, Plagues and Pestilence in my third year of undergrad. And that subject was pretty stinking amazing, so I've hung onto this for the past 14 years with intentions of rereading it someday. So I finally did. I think a better subtitle for this would be "a medical history of Europe (but mostly the UK) and the US from 1750 to the late 90s". Because while there are one or two chapters at the beginning that deal with medicine in ancien [...]

    3. As a history student I was once told by the lecturer “I always say everyone loves history, except when it’s about the past”. In a similar fashion it was recently put to me that if you take one of those great tomes that claims to be about ‘the history of the world’ and open it exactly halfway through you are probably already in the seventeenth century, at least. Even more so than other fields of history, this present-centrism is particularly the case of the history of Medicine. This boo [...]

    4. Prehistory to just before the Renaissance (ish)- A bit of a rattle all things considered. Could have done with a bit more analysis and a bit less dusty listing of eminent persons. But generally a good, broad overview, in a clear style, with sympathies exactly where they should be. The chapters on Indian and Chinese medicine were a particular highlight. Renaissance - The Enlightenment. Porter really shifts the pace down here, taking more time to put changes in medicine into a proper social contex [...]

    5. Is this book for you? I was looking for a history of disease; this wasn't it. It is exactly what the title says: a medical history of humanity, and its approach is perfect primarily for historians and sociologists. Take the time spent on the cautionary tales of surgery, those early butcheries, forced hysterectomies based on supposed nymphomania and so on. When they happened, it was punctually and mainly in the the hands of the quacks and the crazies, and in less regulated regions like Northameri [...]

    6. The author is a good writer and is extremely knowledgeable, but he doesn't tell a very interesting story. It felt like an endless parade of forgotten individuals and the forgotten books they wrote. I understand that medicine progressed in that way, i.e. lots of people building on each others' small discoveries, but it makes for a dull story. I'd have preferred to get to know a handful of truly major figures in medical history rather than have the author briefly touch on dozens and dozens of peop [...]

    7. 'The Greatest Benefit to Mankind' by Roy Porter is a well written and concisely informative narrative of the development of medical science and its relationship with civilization and its progress. The title expresses an opinion that I share. I believe that medicine has bestowed on humankind the greatest benefits of the advancement and institutionalization of a field of knowledge.The beginnings of medicine are as dark and harsh as any of the other realities and practices of those days. Today, med [...]

    8. If you want an interesting, and fairly comprehensive, history of medicine, this is a great place to start. Porter's direct, to-the-point, style works as a counterpoint to his nuanced understanding of how western (science based) medicine came to be, and how it's used around the world as modern medicine. But his perspective expands boundaries, showing not only the history of medicine in various parts of the world but how traditional medicines often complement modern medicines. As the husband of a [...]

    9. This was a really good history of medicine from the earliest times until the end of the nineteenth century, and then ran through the twentieth century, and in particular through the era of effective pharmaceuticals, in a terrible rush, finishing with a discussion of HIV that really showed its age.

    10. -encyclopedic information amount-best skimmed unless already familiar with what is being discussed-well written-already a big out of date, facts and figures from 90s at the latest

    11. Lang, men god og på dansk.Pudsigt så lang tid det tog mennesket at vide noget om kroppe. Først i 1700 tallet fik nogle fx ideen om, at blodet cirkulerer i kroppen. Hjertet var helt misforstået, leveren ligeså. Ja det hele var misforstået. Pudsigt så længe man var om at holde sig til spekulationer og dermed holde sig fra empirisk undersøgelser. Her spillede bluffærdighed en vis rolle. Men også ideen om helhed før del. Det vr sålede meget vanskeligt at komme fra helhedstænkning - men [...]

    12. A compelling perspective on the history of medicine from pre-Antiquity to (almost) the present day. It really brought home to me how rapid the rise of medicine has been over the past 60-70 years and how little it had to offer before that. Mr Porter is certainly opinionated and I don't necessarily agree with the extent of his cynicism at times, albeit with the benefit of 15 years of hindsight. Nonetheless, he raises some compelling questions and paints a detailed picture of medicine throughout th [...]

    13. Overall a good read's amazing how far we've come in medicine ! I will admit some parts of the book put me to sleep whereas others sparked my interests like the section on the history of anesthesia and surgical procedures and techniques. If you are a huge history buff and have a keen interest in the medical sciences, this is the book for you.

    14. 200 pages in & I'm calling it quits. It's an extremely well written book, but it's reading too much like a textbook right now & along with this winter dreariness, I just can't.I'd love to come back to it & plan on doing so.

    15. Encyclopedic, idiosyncratic and deeply learned. Occasionally a little bit of wilful political correctness intrudes, but basically Porter has too fine a grasp of truth to let it disturb his incredible sweeping survey of the culture and science of medicine since history began. Remarkably readabl.e

    16. An absolute MUST read. Fascinating look at the interplay of science, religion, progress, society, and politics with medicine. Medicine will never cure death, we will all die. Sometimes you don't need a pill to get better, just time.

    17. The beginning parts were very interesting and tied together well. It seemed a bit messy, perhaps reflecting the rapid developments of modern medicine, towards the end. I feel I have a better understanding of the philosophical approaches of western medicine.

    18. This is an upper division/ graduate level read. If you are lazy or not truly interested in the history of medicine, don't bother. As medical sociology faculty at Georgia State, I require this book of my students. It's worth your time.

    19. Not the most compelling, reads a bit like a textbook. Also, the author is pretty pessimistic about the advances of medicine, and I felt like the last two chapters contained quite a bit of editorializing. Overall, an interesting read.

    20. An extraordinary book by an engaging author who left us too soon. The most readable and best single volume history of medicine and health care written within the last 50 years.

    21. In a word--DENSE. It was a 'good dense' in that it covered just about everything you could ever want to know about the subject. At times a slow read, but definitely worth working through.

    22. A few inaccuracies here and there and repeated points sometimes, but overall a great and comprehensive book.

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