Where the Dead Sit Talking

Where the Dead Sit Talking A dark authentically voiced lyrical Native American coming of age story set in rural Oklahoma in the late s With his single mother in jail Sequoyah a fifteen year old Cherokee boy is placed i

  • Title: Where the Dead Sit Talking
  • Author: Brandon Hobson
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 263
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • A dark, authentically voiced, lyrical Native American coming of age story set in rural Oklahoma in the late 1980s With his single mother in jail, Sequoyah, a fifteen year old Cherokee boy, is placed in foster care with the Troutt family Literally and figuratively scarred by his unstable upbringing, Sequoyah has spent years mostly keeping to himself, living with his emotiA dark, authentically voiced, lyrical Native American coming of age story set in rural Oklahoma in the late 1980s With his single mother in jail, Sequoyah, a fifteen year old Cherokee boy, is placed in foster care with the Troutt family Literally and figuratively scarred by his unstable upbringing, Sequoyah has spent years mostly keeping to himself, living with his emotions pressed deep below the surface that is, until he meets the seventeen year old Rosemary, another youth staying with the Troutts Sequoyah and Rosemary bond over their shared Native American backgrounds and tumultuous paths through the foster care system, but as Sequoyah s feelings toward Rosemary deepen, the precariousness of their lives and the scars of their pasts threaten to undo them both.

    • ☆ Where the Dead Sit Talking || ã PDF Download by ✓ Brandon Hobson
      263 Brandon Hobson
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Where the Dead Sit Talking || ã PDF Download by ✓ Brandon Hobson
      Posted by:Brandon Hobson
      Published :2019-01-03T02:38:38+00:00

    1 thought on “Where the Dead Sit Talking”

    1. Book to be published February 2018 1980's Oklahoma. At times, a rather dark tale, Where the Dead Sit Talking, is not for the faint of heart. Brandon Hobson's teenage character, Sequoyah, has been abandoned by his father, his mother is in prison, and he had been placed in foster care. Drugs, suicide, sexual awakening/identity are just some of the topics covered within these pages. At times, I felt a bit unsure and disturbed by the unsettling thoughts that raged in Sequoyah 's mind. Even as I am n [...]

    2. Hobson has a fresh way of viewing the world and in this instance through the eyes of a teenage foster child, Sequoyah, who has just joined his latest family. He becomes enamoured of an older resident in his new home who also is Native American and they bound in a heartwarming yet also twisted kind of waynd of how many teenage relationships are formed. Though their foster parents are odd as well they’re not bad people and seem sincerely trying to care for the three kids, which includes a pretee [...]

    3. Where the Dead Sit Talking explores the difficult coming-of-age of Sequoyah, a teenage boy of Cherokee heritage thrust into the U.S. foster care system after his mother’s imprisonment. Hobson brings to light key issues such as racism, mental health, child welfare, and corruption through Sequoyah’s twisted perspective. Adult figures are portrayed as untrustworthy, and even adults in support roles, such as Sequoyah’s foster parents and case worker, are displayed as well-meaning yet flawed. O [...]

    4. While there'd be nothing technically wrong with saying this book is "a spare, lyrical Native American coming of age story set in rural Oklahoma in the late 1980s" that's a bit too tidy and easy a description for this book. Going to live with a new foster family, 15 year old Sequoyah is scarred inside and out and feels sick most of the time with head and stomach aches. He has a lot of weird thoughts and behaviours he doesn't understand, and becomes obsessed with 17 year old Rosemary, another fost [...]

    5. Set in late 1980's rural Oklahoma, "Where the Dead Sit Talking" is the sad, dark tale of a 15-year-old Native American teenager named Sequoyah, sent to live with a foster family after his mother's imprisonment. From the outset of the novel, it is evident that Sequoyah carries many emotional scars, having dealt with his mother's alcoholism and abuse in previous detention settings. Harold and Agnes Troutt are also the foster parents of two other children: George, a younger, also emotionally damage [...]

    6. I was so excited to read it because of my shared Native American heritage with the MC and the author, but I was honestly disappointed. It felt like there were random thoughts and events just thrown in that really didn't add to the story, but were shocking. I almost bailed a few times, but I kept hoping it would tie together in the end, but unfortunately it didn't. I see really high ratings on this book, so maybe it's just me and I hope others enjoy it more than me.

    7. I think this is a vital book, given how it describes the foster care system through the perspective of a troubled Native American teenager who is growing up within that system as well as the various topics that crop up in Sequoyah's world - drug use, gambling, etc. Foster care and how it affects the kids within it is a topic that isn't addressed a lot in books, and those that do don't quite inspire the same kind of disconcerting feeling as Hobson does here. This was just not the book for me, and [...]

    8. Brandon Hobson’s Where the Dead Sit Talking covers the summer in the life of Sequoyah, a Cherokee teenager who grew up mostly in group and foster homes. The summer when he was fifteen, Sequoyah was placed with the Troutts, a rural Oklahoma couple with an affinity for odd and/or troubled children. Sequoyah shows us what it’s like for a child with a rough upbringing and unhealthy thoughts searches for an identity. This is not an easy read and I’m not convinced the rewards are worth the readR [...]

    9. I’m not sure how feel about this book. It is well written and keeps the reader moving along. Parts of this made me uncomfortable. I see that the characters are flawed teens with troubled backgrounds. And although none are bad people doesn’t mean they don’t have dark or bad thoughts. But doesn’t mean I wasn’t put off by the content that was used. I wouldn’t say don’t read this to anyone. But I also can’t say I loved it.

    10. This book is a painful read. The psychological abuse inflicted on Native Americans is expressed through the tortured adolescence of the characters. I wished for a resolution, but there isn't any - yet.

    11. Where the Dead Sit Talking is a wonderful book. It is a very suspenseful, sad, and strange novel about Sequoyah, a Cherokee boy in foster care. Although this is a dark story, I found Sequoyah's character more sad than disturbing, and probably feeling the way a lot of boys feel whose lives are thrown around from place to place. Sequoyah tells from the start that Rosemary, the foster sister, has died, and part of her draw to Sequoyah is that he, at times, tells us he wants to be her. He struggles [...]

    12. I didn't expect to enjoy this novel as much as I did, mainly because the blurbs gave away so much info. The dynamics between the three foster children were quite intriguing. I wish we knew a bit more about the foster mother because she had a rather vital role in this saga. Without giving too much away, even though the novel immediately warns us who will be dying, I felt the death was rather abrupt, considering how much of the novel (and the title) focus on death. I wonder what would have happene [...]

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