The Wonder Engine

The Wonder Engine Pull three people out of prison a disgraced paladin a convicted forger and a heartless assassin Give them weapons carnivorous tattoos and each other Point them at the enemy What could possibly go

  • Title: The Wonder Engine
  • Author: T. Kingfisher
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 469
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Pull three people out of prison a disgraced paladin, a convicted forger, and a heartless assassin Give them weapons, carnivorous tattoos, and each other Point them at the enemy What could possibly go wrong In the sequel to CLOCKWORK BOYS, Slate, Brenner, Caliban and Learned Edmund have arrived in Anuket City, the source of the mysterious Clockwork Boys But the secretPull three people out of prison a disgraced paladin, a convicted forger, and a heartless assassin Give them weapons, carnivorous tattoos, and each other Point them at the enemy What could possibly go wrong In the sequel to CLOCKWORK BOYS, Slate, Brenner, Caliban and Learned Edmund have arrived in Anuket City, the source of the mysterious Clockwork Boys But the secrets they re keeping could well destroy them, before the city even gets the chance

    • ☆ The Wonder Engine || ☆ PDF Download by ↠ T. Kingfisher
      469 T. Kingfisher
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ The Wonder Engine || ☆ PDF Download by ↠ T. Kingfisher
      Posted by:T. Kingfisher
      Published :2018-04-25T00:36:36+00:00

    1 thought on “The Wonder Engine”

    1. The second half of Clocktaur Wars (it's one book, let's not mess about) is as glorious as the first. Kingfisher says this took her over a decade to write: you would not know it from the flowing ease of the writing, which feels joyously effortless. Delightful characters, witty narrative, laugh-out-loud gags, big themes dealt with subtly and sensitively, a quietly powerful and complex moral core about decency to others. Basically Kingfisher is filling up the hole in my heart left by Terry Pratchet [...]

    2. *screams quietly for a while*Look, if you read the first book and you thought "I could stand to have more of that," and you like the idea of a book that has a) the same characters and some excellent new ones, b) a lot of plot-twisty bits or *potential* plot twists that had me quietly freaking out pretty regularly (though I am not good with foreshadowing so ymmv), c) SO MUCH PINING SERIOUSLY, and d) a healthy appreciation for good indexing, this is the book for you!

    3. Loved it. I had to put it down a few times from laughing at the banter between characters. I'll definitely be on the lookout for more books set in this 'verse!

    4. This is not really a sequel as much as a continuation of the first book. I'm starting with this line so that anyone considering reading "the latest one" drops such idea very fast and picks up Clockwork Boys. You really need to read this story from the start.That said, I'm happy to say the second part is as much fun as the first, with some added spiritual themes and a whole lot of romance (of both the doki-doki kind, as in the first part, and the more hands-on approach usually found in western st [...]

    5. Gaaah, awesome just like part 1. I had a moment where I just put the kindle down because I was in denial AND SERIOUSLY SINCE WHEN WAS I SUPPOSED TO HAVE ALL THESE FEELINGS ABOUT THIS ONE CHARACTER??! The ending, oh the ending. All this delicious , barely holding it together, pain ( no seriously that was so well done.)All the small details came together to make sense beautifully and the story is just infused with a sense of duty, and facing consequences and, and yeah I waited two days to write th [...]

    6. Even though I figured going into it that Brenner was a goner, the end of this book still made me cry like a baby. The ending is bittersweet, but rather more bitter than sweet. Still enjoyed it, but I need fix-it fics stat.

    7. Not sure it *quite* lives up to the promise of the first book, but then again I'm not sure what could. Still a good read.

    8. why do books have to END T_Tursula vernon and my college roommate are the only people who could convince me to mess around with paladin romances and enjoy them, so a strong credit to that.

    9. When last we left our alleged heroes, they had just barely survived trekking through the forest of horrors, and were about to step into the enemy city…We arrive in Anuket City and reader and characters are introduced to a setting that is weird, weird, weird. Even by Steampunk standards it’s a weird city. Or Clockpunk Fantasy standards or Kingfisher standards or Sakaar standards or Wonderland or whatever stick you want to measure by. It be weird. The main characters do some sleuthing into wha [...]

    10. I love it! Really it should have been the same book as The Clockwork Boys, flow wise. Also it would have been even longer! A good long book is a hard find. It begins as Slate, Brenner, Learned Edmund, Caliban, and Grimehug (a gnole they met near the end of the last book) entering Anuket City. They find lodgings and begin planning. They search out contacts, one of whom gives the Learned Edmund a big shock. Slate disguises herself as best she can, because she has some old business with the leader [...]

    11. This was a good book. I liked it.I think my expectations may have been set too high by the Paladin Rant (twitter/i/moments/9185672). I interpreted that rant as promising a book that explains how paladins work, and we did get some of that. But I was also hoping for a book that would explain how gods work (cf. Curse of Chalion), and that didn't happen at all.(view spoiler)[Why does the Dreaming God withdraw its power from Caliban after he gets that demon problem? Why does the god return its power [...]

    12. I was prepared to love this, given that I loved Clockwork Boys and everything I've read of T. Kingfisher/Ursula Vernon, but even so, i just thoroughly enjoyed it. The mystery is satisfying, the romance, likewise, and Slate is just such a glorious character. Learned Edmund made *huge* strides in this book. There were several instances of "getting what you want, but in a terrible way" in here, and Kingfisher pulled no punches in concluding the various storylines. The team dynamics continued to be [...]

    13. How good is The Wonder Engine?Let me put it this way. My preorder delivery arrived at 9pm on the 26th. I had to wash the dishes - damn the dishes - but by 10pm I was diving headfirst into Kingfisher's addictive prose. Now it's almost 2am, and I am grinning ear to ear because this book was that good. I love Kingfisher's characters, and her plot, and the sumptuousness of her worldbuilding. Her worlds always feel so rich and lived-in, full of crannies and side trails that I want to explore at leng [...]

    14. I enjoyed this a lot, but somehow it wasn't quite as good as Clockwork Boys (which was possibly the most enjoyable book I read last year, so). It rounded off the duology nicely and subverted some expectations I had for plot in what was actually quite a realistic way, and gave us more of the excellent characters and their dialogue (and sometimes inner monologue).Nitpicks with spoilers: it does wrap up a couple of big issues in an almost too neat, perfunctory DnD-GM-is-not-so-interested-in-this wa [...]

    15. An excellent ending to the story, though I'm sad this story arc is over. Loved the path Edmund's arc took, the gnolls were so satisfying and interesting. I love main characters that are flawed and so relatable, and Slate is one of the best in this regard I've read in a while. And so nice to get a Paladin that isn't completely insufferable! Or at least, not insufferable for the usual reasons paladins are (view spoiler)[Most importantly, imo, the romance is excellent. Utterly sympathize with the w [...]

    16. wordnerdy/2018/03The second and final book in Kingfisher's (the pen name for Ursula Vernon's more adult works) Clocktaur War series (after Clockwork Boys) is creepy, dark, romantic, hilarious, and awesome. I love the characters here (particularly the badger-like gnoles and the young academic) and the plotting and action are tight. If you haven't read any books by Vernon, you are really missing out--she has a distinct (and distinctly entertaining) voice. I just really enjoy everything she writes [...]

    17. If you have ever played D&D, please read this series. Kingfisher clearly understands the genre and the archetypes of the five man-band (well, three men, one woman, one gnole, and a little bit of dead demon) and, in a style I can almost call Pratchettian, does a send-up of the whole thing by taking it very seriously. The only reason I waited so long to make my husband read it was because he would not have been pleased if I'd left him with the cliffhanger at the end of book one.

    18. Love this writer. I have enjoyed reading every book I have been able to get hold of that she has written and have been eagerly awaiting this one. Both books in this series are really good I have been eagerly awaiting this one. It is excellent as is everything I have read by this author. THANK YOU AND PLEASE KEEP WRITING

    19. Another excellent book from Ursula Vernon, pen name T. Kingfisher! I've been waiting for this book for about a decade, ever since she posted a snipped about a thief/accountant in a dungeon that, for some reason, reeked of rosemary. It was worth the wait.

    20. Yes!!!!This is Kingfisher’s best work yet I believe. I love her portrayal of Caliban, the paladin. I read much of it at work, and there were points that I cackled with laughter, and times I had to stop reading because otherwise I would have been sobbing at work.

    21. Wow! Really great finish to this duology about espionage, disgraced paladins, and the importance of proper indexing. This is occasionally darker than some of her other stories, but still a good read for the wry humor and essential goodness of the characters.

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