The Last of How It Was

The Last of How It Was The last of the trilogy set in and around the fictional town of Neely North Carolina The Last of How It Was is narrated by young Louis Benfield and is primarily concerned with the convoluted and oft

  • Title: The Last of How It Was
  • Author: T.R. Pearson
  • ISBN: 9780671617387
  • Page: 363
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The last of the trilogy set in and around the fictional town of Neely, North Carolina, The Last of How It Was is narrated by young Louis Benfield and is primarily concerned with the convoluted and often tragic Benfield family history.

    • Best Read [T.R. Pearson] ☆ The Last of How It Was || [Humor and Comedy Book] PDF ✓
      363 T.R. Pearson
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [T.R. Pearson] ☆ The Last of How It Was || [Humor and Comedy Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:T.R. Pearson
      Published :2019-01-25T10:12:19+00:00

    1 thought on “The Last of How It Was”

    1. This is a book about stories and storytelling, and especially about oral narrative.It contains a lot of stories, but not in the way that, say, a collection of short stories contains a lot of stories. At one level this book is a single story. But in telling the story, the narrators--there is more than one--repeatedly get sidetracked and start off in new narrative directions in order to tell other stories, the purpose of which, sometimes, is to further illuminate the main story. Then again, someti [...]

    2. The Last of How It Was is the best book I almost never read. I grew up lollygagging in living rooms and kitchens listening to family gossip, soap operas and grapevine news flashes. Keeping a low profile and an open ear was the pipeline to all the best information the world had to offer, courtesy of my mother and aunts. So too, does Pearson’s fictional Louis Benfield, gain his education in the Last of How It Was. A rambling tale of a fictitious Southern family, chock full of strange yet loveabl [...]

    3. Unquestionably the funniest book I've ever read. The first time I read the book, my mother was in the same room with me and kept asking me why I was laughing so hard, but it's impossible to read a passage from this book aloud.Some people might find Pearson's style of writing hard to get used to - unless they're from the South. The book is written exactly as if it's being told to someone and there are sentences that go on for paragraphs and stories that splinter off into asides and back again. I [...]

    4. T.R, Pearson's books do not really get this side of the pond. After reading the very excellent Cry Me a River and A Short History of a Small Place I was expecting more from this one.After plugging away and plugging away at it, by the middle you finally DO come to realise that it is a book with something to say but so stylised as to be one track only. The e.emmings "i had an uncle named sol" long winded discursive style gets to be too much and this is a real pity. Buried in there are some real ge [...]

    5. Clearly not for everyone and an effort to get through, even for me who loves it. A funny, poignant, outrageous story about the stories we tell. No story is not dependent on another story. Any story worth its salt reminds us of another story. Every story has some story that went before. In this very southern novel our family story is part and parcel of who we are, yet anyone is capable of surprising us. We can usurp someone's story, but no one but that person can really appreciate what that story [...]

    6. It took me forever (70 pages at least!) to get into Pearson's writing style--long paragraphs of one long sentence with minimal punctuation. But the family stories, relationships, and tangential stories were humorous. The last 30 pages were my favorite, and I'm glad I stuck with it.

    7. Quirky isn't the half of how it is. Very peculiar style, engaging sometimes, but long. What's the story? Where is it going? Anywhere?

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