The Wind in the Willows

The Wind in the Willows One of the most celebrated works of classic literature for childrenMeet little Mole willful Ratty Badger the perennial bachelor and petulant Toad Over one hundred years since their first appearance

  • Title: The Wind in the Willows
  • Author: Kenneth Grahame
  • ISBN: 9780517223611
  • Page: 474
  • Format: Hardcover
  • One of the most celebrated works of classic literature for childrenMeet little Mole, willful Ratty, Badger the perennial bachelor, and petulant Toad Over one hundred years since their first appearance in 1908, they ve become emblematic archetypes of eccentricity, folly, and friendship And their misadventures in gypsy caravans, stolen sports cars, and their Wild Wood contOne of the most celebrated works of classic literature for childrenMeet little Mole, willful Ratty, Badger the perennial bachelor, and petulant Toad Over one hundred years since their first appearance in 1908, they ve become emblematic archetypes of eccentricity, folly, and friendship And their misadventures in gypsy caravans, stolen sports cars, and their Wild Wood continue to capture readers imaginations and warm their hearts long after they grow up Begun as a series of letters from Kenneth Grahame to his son, The Wind in the Willows is a timeless tale of animal cunning and human camaraderie This Penguin Classics edition features an appendix of the letters in which Grahame first related the exploits of Toad.

    The Wind in the Willows The Wind in the Willows is a children s novel by Kenneth Grahame, first published in Alternately slow moving and fast paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animals in a pastoral version of Edwardian England. Kansas Dust in the Wind Official Video YouTube Nov , Dust in the wind, all they are is dust in the wind Same old song, just a drop of water in an endless sea All we do crumbles to the ground, though we refuse to see The Wind in the Trees Hours of Natural White Noise Jun , Enjoy the white noise sounds of the wind blowing through the trees as recorded live on site in the woodlands of Pennsylvania. In The Wind Flags Flags and Garden Decor In The Wind is proud to bring you a great selection of decor and popular gift items at the best possible prices We strive to offer the best designs in decorative flags, design posts, wind chimes, and other decor We promise to always offer products from leading manufacturers with a history of product reliability and quality workmanship. Wind Define Wind at Dictionary break wind, to expel gas from the stomach and bowels through the anus how the wind blows lies, what the tendency or probability is Try to find out how the wind blows Also which way the wind blows in the teeth of the wind, sailing directly into the wind against the Wind definition of wind by The Free Dictionary wind applies to air in motion, blowing with any degree of gentleness or violence a strong wind a westerly wind A breeze is usu a cool, light wind technically, it is a wind of mph a refreshing breeze zephyr , a literary word, refers to a soft, mild breeze a zephyr whispering through palm trees. Wind Department of Energy National Offshore Wind Strategy Facilitating the Development of the Offshore Wind Industry in the United States Offshore wind energy holds the promise of significant environmental and

    • [PDF] Ì Free Read ✓ The Wind in the Willows : by Kenneth Grahame ↠
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      Posted by:Kenneth Grahame
      Published :2018-09-17T06:59:16+00:00

    1 thought on “The Wind in the Willows”

    1. Trying to review The Wind in the Willows is a strange undertaking. In the introduction to my copy, A. A. Milne wrote:"One can argue over the merits of most books one does not argue about The Wind in the Willows. The young man gives it to the girl with whom he is in love, and if she does not like it, he asks her to return his letters. The old man tries it on his nephew, and alters his will accordingly. When you sit down to [read] it, don't be so ridiculous as to suppose you are sitting in judgme [...]

    2. This book was written in 1908, when the world was being shaken by the newly self-confident masses. Women were propagandising for the vote; the Irish were demanding Home Rule; the Trade Unions were showing their strength. Socialism theatened. A spectre was haunting Europe, and particularly England. Wind in the Willows is an elegant parable about class struggle, about the dangers of decadant country-house-living in the face of powerful revolutionary forces. There are maybe four generations in the [...]

    3. PART TWO OF PETER JACKSON'S THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS (CONCLUSION)[Night. Toad Hall, interior. STEPHEN FRY as TOAD and ORLANDO BLOOM as BADGER are in the middle of a wild melée with numerous STOATS and WEASELS.]BADGER: It's no good, Toad! There's too many of them! [With a blow of his cudgel, he knocks a WEASEL into the open fire.]TOAD: We can hold them off, Badger old chap![EVANGELINE LILLY as a HOT BADGER-BABE crashes through the window and lands next to them.]BADGER: [Choked with emotion] You c [...]

    4. An Edwardian children's book that ends with the reimposition by force of the traditional squirearchical social order on the upstart lower orders as represented by Weasels, Stoats and Ferrets.It is a through introduction to traditional British conservatism, of the Country Life rather than the Economist variety, for children with a side order of mild paganism. As such is an unwitting counterpoint to The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists.As with How to Read Donald Duck, once you look at it and shrug [...]

    5. A genuinely refreshing little romp through tunnels and pastures. Zen is something that's somehow-- & very surprisingly-- reached. This is the ultimate impression the reader is left with.Outstanding, engaging and more fun than Aesop's menagerie, it moralizes vaguely on fidelity, the value of friendships & associations The final sentence even addresses finally the main target audience-- the 'lil tykes and treasured ones; and even sustains with the theory that looks may be deceiving the Bad [...]

    6. Lavishly described meandering adventures of the mild nature. The Wind in the Willows has an intrinsically English flavor. The characters are happy to live their ordinary lives with only a hint of interest in the wider world. Too strong of an adventurous spiritedness is considered uncouth. Such hearty frivolity as Toad's is frowned upon to the utmost! Unfortunately this goes for the author, too. Kenneth Grahame's plots are not terribly gripping due to their lack of depth. He seems pleased rather [...]

    7. This is one of those books I want to love; I REALLY, really want to love this book. I've read so many essays by book lovers who have fond, childhood memories of being read this by their father, or who ushered in spring each year by taking this book to a grassy field and reading this in the first warm breezes of May. I want to find the tea and boating and wooded English countryside to be slow yet sonoriously comforting, like a Bach cello suite or a warm cup of cider on a cool April night. But I j [...]

    8. I feel like I am the only person in the universe to not *get* this book. Perhaps I am not really human, but rather a troll or some other such hard-hearted creature. I suppose my main issue with this book is that I couldn't quite understand the world that Mr. Grahame created. Pithy words of wisdom on What It Means To Be A Child tell us that children don't have preconceptions and thus accept things more readily, being shaped only by the prejudices of adults. I assume most people would use that arg [...]

    9. They don't write books like The Wind in the Willows anymore. Today's books for children are sly rhymes, action and social engineering. Wind belongs to an older, more innocent time when even accomplished men such as Kenneth Grahame, A. A. Milne and J. R. R. Tolkien invented stories for their children. Stories which over the years became classics of literature. Wind isn't a fairy tale so much as it's life told for those who will inherit it. Told by those who love the inheritors.Even if you've read [...]

    10. And with just 6 hours to spare - the 2017 Pop Sugar Reading Challenge has been completedThe prompt: A book you bought on a trip.A whimsical classic tale featuring Mole, Rat, Badger and Toad. We have sheltered Mole, venturing out to see the river with Rat. There's the stodgy old Badger who turns out to be much more warmhearted than anticipated. The fanciful Toad learns several valuable life lessons - one of which requires the garb of a grandmother during a prison escape!Charming, fun and a bit co [...]

    11. Having first read this so many years ago, I found myself revisiting it with joy and some incredulity that it's still seen as a children's book. It's sublime - the poetry of the prose; the descriptions of the natural world; the sly PG Wodehouse humour, and most of all the jewel-like clarity of that very little world: the Riverbank; the Wild Wood; the World Beyond a kind of blur on the distant horizon. The characters are marvellous: combining some wonderful comic dialogue (which I can't help heari [...]

    12. This is one of the cutest, most relaxing books I've ever read. I loved the cartoon as a kid. Nothing particularly exciting happens but it's just peaceful :)

    13. If you have children and you have not read this gem with them, do it now. Go buy a lovely illustrated edition and make a memory that I think will last beyond childhood. Mole, Ratty, Toad and Badger are characters worth knowing and visiting in childhood again and again.When I closed the last page of this book, I was sad to see these characters go. I enjoyed the story, which had a classic quality from page one. There are numerous lessons to be learned here, the value of nature and how to live a ba [...]

    14. Some of the best children’s classics have started with an adult inventing stories to tell to a child. “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”, “Winnie the Pooh”, “Peter Pan” and even “Watership Down” all began this way, as did many others. The Wind in the Willows is another such. Like them, it is a novel which can be read on many levels, and arguably has a hidden subtext. And like some others, its writing was prompted by a family tragedy.Kenneth Grahame had already established him [...]

    15. Ok, second attempt at a review after the damn interwebs ate my last one. Luckily I’m composing this one offline first.To me Kenneth Grahame’s _The Wind in the Willows_ is a particularly fine novel. It’s a children’s story and normally that would get my back up. I’m generally not a big fan of children’s lit or YA, and to add to this I didn’t even read this book as a child and thus have the requisite rose-coloured glasses to lend credence to my love for the story. Somehow, however, t [...]

    16. As a child I adored these tales. The TV show was great with real live animals from the riverbank and the calming voice of the narrator. Imagine living by a riverbank and having breakfast with the animals like Snow White. To watch the otters play. To listen to the water as it babbles over the stones and pebbles. To sing with the birds and marvel at the kingfishers with their iridescent feathers and absolute beauty. To wonder at the bees and butterflies as they collect nectar from colourful flower [...]

    17. I found Wind in the Willows to be one of those rare books that contains true joy. Several times since I have moved in with the Kenyons, I have gotten in a disagreement with another opinionated member of the household over the value of "dark" literature versus "light" literature. "It is so easy to write about dark things," she might say. "Why don't we focus on happiness?" I think when most people read a "happy" story, they find it shallow, unrealistic, and boorish since, as any random perusal of [...]

    18. I was suspicious of this book when I was a kid. It's all, "Hey kids, here's a fun story about talking animals," right? And I was like no, this is just you banging on about trees. This is a pastoral poem in disguise. It's boring. This book is like the guy who comes into your classroom and sits backwards on a chair all, "Sammy the sock puppet is here to get real about abstinence!" It's like when your mom was like "I froze this banana and it's just as good as a popsicle!" It is not. Mom is full of [...]

    19. "The real way to travel The only way to travel! O bliss! O poop-poop! What carts I shall fling into the ditch! Horrid carts-- common carts-- canary-coloured carts!. Me complain of that beautiful, heavenly vision! That swan, that sunbeam, that thunderbolt!"--Frog on automobiles

    20. I found myself smiling as I finished this reading of The Wind in the Willows. Yes I enjoyed the tale of Rat and Mole and Badger and Toad and all the other assorted animals and their people who populate that corner of England. What struck me most during this reading, which is my second as far as I recall, is that this just doesn't feel like a children's book in so many ways. The language is so rich. The descriptions, whether of characters or places, are so full. I find this better in some ways as [...]

    21. This really isn't a children's book; I don't think you can really admire the beauty here until you are older. My edition is, in fact, the edition my great aunt gave my father.It isn't so much the sense of a simpler time, more of a sense of simpler life. If the Hobbits in Middle Earth are the standard English folk, the animals, the mammals, are the standard English folk here.Still enjoyable.Love Ratty.

    22. It takes a mean adult to criticize a children's book; and a mean child to moralize a children's book, IMO.

    23. I forgot how much I loved this book. Previous reviewers I have read seem to find it wordy or cumbersome. Personally, I find it beautifully descriptive. I am currently reading it to my 3 and 4 year old boys at bed time, a half a chapter at a time, and they seem to be enjoying it, as well. No, its not a quick, easy read, but it is worth it for all the lost vocabulary that we see so seldom in modern author's works.

    24. 2016: Wonderfully read by Mary Woods, this children's classic was poetic & dream-like. Animals that live in the wild, yet like humans complete with breakfasts of eggs & bacon. They speak to horses, yet keep them for the carriages & a Toad in a dress is easily mistaken for a washerwoman. Grahame's descriptions were sometimes a bit long, but always evocative & his characters were wonderful. Ratty, Badger, Mole, & Toad were a hoot, especially Toad, of course. His addiction to ca [...]

    25. There are undoubtedly some lovely, engaging and entertaining moments along the way – and there are clearly some memorable characters in Kenneth Grahame’s ‘Wind in the Willows’. (This edition is beautifully illustrated by Ernest Shepard which enhances the stories no end).Somehow, some way though – I just don’t get it… I don’t understand the great appeal, the classic literary status or the high esteem in which Grahame’s book is held? Clearly I am missing something and I’m not s [...]

    26. One of the great classics with animals and soft creeks and idyllic surroundings, my childhood memories can still hear that breeze rustling through the glades alongside the Thames. The adventures of Toad, Rat, Mole, and Badger are universal in their light moral messages and each is endearing and will create enduring memories in the hearts of your children. Come to think of it, it is about time I dusted this off and read it to my kids!

    27. This book has everything that you need in a children's book! Caricature animals, morals in disguise, adventure and humour. It also has a special ambiance about it that makes you feel safe and content while reading this story. I'm surprised I haven't read it before, because I know I would've absolutely loved it as a child. My favourite character was the Mole; however, the absurd and stupid Mr. Toad cracked me up, and I ended up absolutely loving him as well. I also loved the setting of the woods [...]

    28. I picked this book up at a library sale for about $2. I'm reading it aloud to the kids as "bedtime stories." We're also intermittenly watching a few of the million movie versions.At first the kids stared blankly off into space as I read, as the words are bigger and more complex even than the ones I use with them (and more than a few people have taken notice of how "big" I speak to my kids). Even I had to read pages a second time to understand what exactly we were reading about. But once we got i [...]

    29. Following the resounding success of my Locus Quest, I faced a dilemma: which reading list to follow it up with? Variety is the spice of life, so I’ve decided to diversify and pursue six different lists simultaneously. This book falls into my BEDTIME STORIES list.I have a little boy and love reading to him, so this reading list will cover the classic (and new) children’s stories we’re enjoying together.The Wind in the Willows is a funny old book, isn’t it?The adventures of Ratty, Mole and [...]

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