Pu-239 And Other Russian Fantasies

Pu And Other Russian Fantasies With the publication of his first story collection Thirst also a New York Times Notable Book of the Year Ken Kalfus made a dazzling debut emerging as a major literary talent Salon Now in this eager

  • Title: Pu-239 And Other Russian Fantasies
  • Author: Ken Kalfus
  • ISBN: 9780743400756
  • Page: 462
  • Format: Paperback
  • With the publication of his first story collection, Thirst also a New York Times Notable Book of the Year Ken Kalfus made a dazzling debut, emerging as a major literary talent Salon Now, in this eagerly anticipated follow up drawn from his four years living in Moscow and traveling the breadth of the Russian landscape Kalfus creates unforgettable etchWith the publication of his first story collection, Thirst also a New York Times Notable Book of the Year Ken Kalfus made a dazzling debut, emerging as a major literary talent Salon Now, in this eagerly anticipated follow up drawn from his four years living in Moscow and traveling the breadth of the Russian landscape Kalfus creates unforgettable etchings of individual lives throughout a century of turbulent history, in tales that range from hair raising to comic to fabulous Imaginative, densely detailed, and consistently rewarding, PU 239 And Other Russian Fantasies is a brilliant showcase for one of the most interesting writers working today The San Diego Union Tribune.

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      Published :2018-011-01T01:21:33+00:00

    1 thought on “Pu-239 And Other Russian Fantasies”

    1. Wise, dark marvelous short stories set in Russia, in various political climates and eras from the Stalinist through the collapse of the Soviet Union and into the capitalist era. The title story, PU-238 is an absolute gut punch of a tale and sets the tone for the collection. As an employee of a patched-together nuclear power plant faces death following a malfunction (echoes of Chernobyl) he decides to turn to the new 'marketplace' for a desperate compensation. After reading this first story, you [...]

    2. These are dark gritty stories of Russia's past, from pre-WWII through the cold war and into post Perostroika. They evoke a sense of familiarity of what we conventionally think of as an oppressive Soviet state, but these stories also let us imagine what it might be like to be entirely human during those times, and how one might have been inspired by the ideals of socialism, representing a notion of human development which is lost upon the present-day American mind.

    3. Personalising the politicalOne of the best books of 2013 is Ken Kalfus’ Equilateral, an insightful, subtly humorous and wonderfully written novel in the vein of classic sci-fi. (If you haven’t read it yet, why haven’t you?) I’d never heard of Kalfus before reading it, so am now working my way backwards through his previous stuff…Kalfus lived in Russia during the period 1994-1998, when his wife was appointed Moscow bureau chief of the Philadelphia Inquirer, allowing him to get to know t [...]

    4. I suppose I have finally embraced the genre of the short story collection. In fact, I continually borrow books of this genre. Here is one other example of a short story collection that I read recently, and again, I am not so satisfied.Pu-239 is a collection of short stories written by Ken Kalfus. The main arching theme of this collection is Russia. Even the fable Salt is centered around Russia, albeit a fantastic one. I got interested in this collection because I saw a movie preview of Pu-239 on [...]

    5. The real reward of this collection is the novella at the end. This longer form allows Kalfus to fully explore the nature of an individual in Soviet society. While the preceding stories were written with masterful prose, they tended to offer a more surface-level look at the characters and the world they inhabit. Certainly, the whole books is full of great research and provides interesting details on the Soviet Union, and several of the stories resonate beyond the page.

    6. I see why critics like Kalfus. Plotting is unique and large on taking chances and his wordmanship is good. And yet, this work does not click with me. I'll assume the fault but the situation stands.

    7. There are some very Russian moments that were captured quite well by the author. He gives real life (as in grit, reality) to these vague, historic notions. The stories range in quality, but I would recommend them as a whole.

    8. Can't remember this very well. I think it was just a bunch of Sovierotica, Eastern men in leather jackets selling plutonium and suchlike. It was well-written though, so better than The Tzar of Love and Techno. A comfortable read though very forgettable.

    9. A mixed bag. Kalfus is an American who spent some time living in Russia and the writes these Soviet-era tales like a native (a compliment). The title story is wonderful and unnerving, but the later ones are all over the place. Some good, some meh. Definitely a worthwhile read, however

    10. Though written with a clear love of language and experimental expression, "Pu-239" doesn't have a permanent place on my table. While the stories are all moving (in a profoundly Russian, heart-breaking way), I had trouble connecting with them. I greatly admire Kalfus' bold use of different narrative styles; he ranges from plain, fable-like prose to a narrative put together by fractals of prose poetry. He pulls each of them off rather well, but there is a distance between the reader and the storyt [...]

    11. the titular story was very good, though admittedly i think i preferred the movie more. various other stories within the book were even better, and as usual with collections of short stories there were some i loved and really connected with and others i felt a bit ambivalent about. the novella at the end was a bit disappointing, i felt, and lacking in character development. a few stories i felt this is where kalfus fell short; his attention to detail and journalistic approach to his reach is spot [...]

    12. a few great short stories, the others were just ok. not much on character development. Kalfus does a good job of capturing the Russian experience without overblowing his description of the country, cities, or people.

    13. I read the title story after hearing the HBO (or was it Showtime) movie was really good. The story is pretty good and ends with a great moment. I really like Kalfus's writing, so I'll be sure to finish this off in the near future.

    14. Ignore the sadly non parodic Onion review that refers to short stories as a genre and states that Kalfus "lacks oomph." I havent been this absorbed all year. Birobidzhan might well be a perfect story.

    15. 2.5. Lacked the characteristics to be a favorite Russian collection or engaging set of short stories.

    16. Although some stories work better than others, they are at least interesting, and most of the time fascinating. I intend to read more of Kalfus' work.

    17. Ken Kalfus is fantastic. This collection is completely absorbing. His word choices, rhythms, and structures are perfect. He is an absolute delight to read.

    18. Tecnicamente questa raccolta è buona, però non mi è piaciuta molto, ho trovato i racconti parecchio noiosi, eccetto Peredelkino e Birobidzan.

    19. Pushcart Prize RecipientFinalist, PEN/Faulkner AwardA New York Times Notable Book of the YearVillage Voice Writer on the Verge Award

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