Fiction and History in England, 1066-1200

Fiction and History in England The century and a half following the Norman Conquest of saw an explosion in the writing of Latin and vernacular history in England while the creation of the romance genre reinvented the fictiona

  • Title: Fiction and History in England, 1066-1200
  • Author: Laura Ashe
  • ISBN: 9780521878913
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The century and a half following the Norman Conquest of 1066 saw an explosion in the writing of Latin and vernacular history in England, while the creation of the romance genre reinvented the fictional narrative Where critics have seen these developments as part of a cross Channel phenomenon, Laura Ashe argues that a genuinely distinctive character can be found in the wriThe century and a half following the Norman Conquest of 1066 saw an explosion in the writing of Latin and vernacular history in England, while the creation of the romance genre reinvented the fictional narrative Where critics have seen these developments as part of a cross Channel phenomenon, Laura Ashe argues that a genuinely distinctive character can be found in the writings of England during the period Drawing on a wide range of historical, legal and cultural contexts, she discusses how writers addressed the Conquest and rebuilt their sense of identity as a new, united English people, with their own national literature and culture, in a manner which was to influence all subsequent medieval English literature This study opens up new ways of reading post Conquest texts in relation to developments in political and legal history, and in terms of their place in the English Middle Ages as a whole.

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      437 Laura Ashe
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      Posted by:Laura Ashe
      Published :2018-09-10T17:08:22+00:00

    1 thought on “Fiction and History in England, 1066-1200”

    1. Brilliant study of what gave birth to an English identity. Answer: the land, England. Ashe proves this through analyzing works like the Bayeux Tapestry, clerical histories, the earliest romance, and the Purgatory of St. Patrick (written by Marie de France). Ashe's knowledge and handling of resources is astounding, and her writing and organization enables a dilettante like me to comprehend the points she makes about historiography. Truly enlightening.

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