Lessons from Little Rock

Lessons from Little Rock Sober news reports of a U S Army convoy rumbling across the bridge into Little Rock cannot overpower this intimate powerful personal account of the integration of Little Rock Central High School Sho

  • Title: Lessons from Little Rock
  • Author: Terrence Roberts
  • ISBN: 9781935106111
  • Page: 126
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Sober news reports of a U.S Army convoy rumbling across the bridge into Little Rock cannot overpower this intimate, powerful, personal account of the integration of Little Rock Central High School Showing what it felt like to be one of those nine students who wanted only a good high school education, Robertsas rich narrative and candid voice take readers through that rocSober news reports of a U.S Army convoy rumbling across the bridge into Little Rock cannot overpower this intimate, powerful, personal account of the integration of Little Rock Central High School Showing what it felt like to be one of those nine students who wanted only a good high school education, Robertsas rich narrative and candid voice take readers through that rocky year, helping us realize that the historic events of the Little Rock integration crisis happened to real peopleato children, parents, our fellow citizens.

    • Unlimited [Fantasy Book] ☆ Lessons from Little Rock - by Terrence Roberts ↠
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      Posted by:Terrence Roberts
      Published :2018-08-11T13:36:12+00:00

    1 thought on “Lessons from Little Rock”

    1. What a profound account Dr. Roberts shares in his book. I feel like I need to give this 5 stars because the story needs to be told and written about and overall I'm floored. But, I wish this actually told more. So much of it read like a psychoanalysis of what transpired instead of a plain narrative of what he felt and experienced. I guess it's unfair of me, but I didn't want to read a psychologically driven narrative of how an older man saw his younger self. I know it's hard to see things as the [...]

    2. This is an eye-opening reminder that social justice isn't as easy as we think, and that nonviolence is one of the hardest things you can commit yourself to. The writing gets better as you go on, especially in the final chapters as the discussion turns from remembering the years at Central to providing solutions and ways that we can and must move forward. The final chapters were undoubtedly my favorite part of the book.

    3. An amazing story of one of the 9 students who were the first black students at Little Rock Central High School. This is not only an important addition to the story of the civil rights movement, but it is also the very personal story of Terrence Roberts, his family, and the effect that this incident, as well as many incidents since that time, had on him and his family.

    4. This is the story of the Little Rock integration as told from the perspective of Terrence Roberts, one of the “Little Rock Nine”. This book is filled with vignettes from Dr. Roberts, going back to when he was a very young child growing up in Little Rock. It is an excellent look of what it meant to be black in Arkansas in the 1940s and 50s. It was amazing to read about all the methods Dr. Roberts employed to keep his sanity and dignity in tact. It was even more amazing, however, to read his w [...]

    5. This is a story that needed to be told and, as a member of the Little Rock 9, Roberts is certainly qualified to tell it. The prose, however, leaves a bit to be desired. There were times where the book felt as though it had been written for an audience completely new to African American's and African American culture. Maybe Robert's intent was a broad stroke that would speak to any reader. It's worth the read but I suspect there are more engaging books to be read on the subject.

    6. I was anxious to read this book as a companion to Warriors Don't Cry which is also about the Little Rock 9. I didn't find this nearly as engaging. The writing is a bit choppy at times and he includes much more about his life before the Central High integration. It was a more detached view of what happened - surprisingly not a lot of emotion. I'm glad I read it but it won't stay with me like Warriors Don't Cry.

    7. I read this for HB Reads One Book. Terrence Roberts was of the nine high school students that were selected to go to an all white high school. I learned so much reading this book. It is my new favorite non-fiction book. He says a lot about how and why we treat people.

    8. I bought this book after hearing Roberts speak at a local school. I had read "Warriors Don't Cry" years ago, and it was interesting to get a male viewpoint of the daunting experiences of the Little Rock nine. Every one of them is a hero in my eyes.

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