A Burning Desire: Dharma God and the Path of Recovery

A Burning Desire Dharma God and the Path of Recovery A Burning Desire is a gift for those who struggle with the Twelve Step program s focus on the need to surrender to a Higher Power Taking a radical departure from traditional views of God Western or E

  • Title: A Burning Desire: Dharma God and the Path of Recovery
  • Author: Kevin Griffin
  • ISBN: 9781401923211
  • Page: 191
  • Format: Paperback
  • A Burning Desire is a gift for those who struggle with the Twelve Step program s focus on the need to surrender to a Higher Power Taking a radical departure from traditional views of God, Western or Eastern, author Kevin Griffin neither accepts Christian beliefs in a Supreme Being nor Buddhist non theism, but rather forges a refreshing, sensible, and accessible Middle WayA Burning Desire is a gift for those who struggle with the Twelve Step program s focus on the need to surrender to a Higher Power Taking a radical departure from traditional views of God, Western or Eastern, author Kevin Griffin neither accepts Christian beliefs in a Supreme Being nor Buddhist non theism, but rather forges a refreshing, sensible, and accessible Middle Way Griffin shows how the Dharma, the teachings of the Buddha, can be understood as a Higher Power Karma, mindfulness, impermanence, and the Eightfold Path itself are revealed as powerful forces that can be accessed through meditation and inquiry.Drawing from his own experiences with substance abuse, rehabilitation, and recovery, Griffin looks at the various ways that meditation and spiritual practices helped deepen his experience of sobriety His personal story of addiction is not only raw, honest and engrossing, but guides readers to an inquiry of their own spirituality In doing so, he poses profound questions, including How can I understand God from a Buddhist perspective How can I turn my will and my life over as a Buddhist How can this idea of God remove my shortcomings How do I learn this God s will

    • ↠ A Burning Desire: Dharma God and the Path of Recovery || ☆ PDF Download by ✓ Kevin Griffin
      191 Kevin Griffin
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ A Burning Desire: Dharma God and the Path of Recovery || ☆ PDF Download by ✓ Kevin Griffin
      Posted by:Kevin Griffin
      Published :2019-02-21T16:36:12+00:00

    1 thought on “A Burning Desire: Dharma God and the Path of Recovery”

    1. Well this is a ripper! I have been delving into this particular line of inquiry for a while and have belted through 4 books already. All had something to offer but this one is a definitive work. Kevin Griffin's earleir work "One Breath At a Time" was a major stimulus for me to start on this path that has become so central to my life, not that at that time I really had any choice but to fall though the bottom of my rock bottom. That book showed me how to relate to 12 step programmes in a way that [...]

    2. Burning Desire is well written, clear, unique and philosophically sound. It's not just a good recovery book, it's a good Buddhist book, it's a good agnostic book, it's a good book for people struggling with related issues. In a world where the word "God" so often triggers defensiveness and creates a divide, Kevin's words build a bridge that makes 12 step programs accessible to people with non-traditional backgrounds and spiritual practices. He's doing the work of building community and he does i [...]

    3. This is Kevin's second book and an incredible, solid reflection on 12-step work and Buddhism. I have dog-eared more pages in this book than any I have in any book I have read since the Dalai Lama's "Art of Happiness." His observations about alcoholic recovery and how he relates it to Buddhism rival Bill Wilson's 12 and 12 and other great works of spirituality and recovery. This is a must-read book for 12-steppers and anyone interested in an intimate look at a search for a higher power and how pr [...]

    4. Kevin has a great voice and this is an excellent resource for people wondering what a “Higher Power” means to somebody who practices Buddhism (hint: it means many things). I have been to a few of Kevin’s talks and I always learn something that I can apply to my own spirituality. The book is also well researched and well cited.One of the things I really like about this book is it provides original “prayers” that can help align intentions with action. Here’s one example as it relates t [...]

    5. Exceedingly practical recommendations for the Buddhist, atheist, agnostic or otherwise non-deist addict negotiating the 12 steps of recovery which are heavily influenced by the notion of an "Abrahamic" God.If you are fully compatible with the God of the original 12 steps (that of Christianity, Islam, Judaism) then this book is not likely going to interest you much. But if you're an agnostic or Buddhist addict and wrestle with reciting the steps that mention God, this book will quite likely reson [...]

    6. I don't shower books with stars, so while I like this book, and got a lot out if it, I don't feel the need to rate it as a five. However, I do recommend this book, and I certainly wish it was available to me earlier in my recovery. I struggled with the idea of a higher power. As an agnostic, having hit the third step quite hard, I left the program, returning to recovery 18 months later. This book would have helped me get through the third step the first time.

    7. I will highly recommend this to persons trying to achieve recovery in a 12-step program, especially if they are struggling with the christian-centric idea of god and the higher power, and absolutely if they identify as Buddhist. This book is not revelatory, but certainly helpful and provides many interesting ideas of how to appraoch recovery using Buddhist principles, which have given me a healthy balance and other perspective compared to those traditionally provided in AA communities.

    8. A great book for anyone who has an interest in Buddhist philosophy and 12 Step work. Kevin writes very clearly and from a wealth of experience.

    9. I found the description of "higher power" to be fascinating. I think it will be very helpful to use with individuals in therapy who are reticent to join AA because of an issue with the use of "God."

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *