Sense and Sensibilia: Reconstructed from the Manuscript Notes by C.J. Warnock

Sense and Sensibilia Reconstructed from the Manuscript Notes by C J Warnock A very nice book

  • Title: Sense and Sensibilia: Reconstructed from the Manuscript Notes by C.J. Warnock
  • Author: J.L. Austin Geoffrey J. Warnock
  • ISBN: 9780195003079
  • Page: 217
  • Format: Paperback
  • A very nice book

    • [PDF] Download ✓ Sense and Sensibilia: Reconstructed from the Manuscript Notes by C.J. Warnock | by ✓ J.L. Austin Geoffrey J. Warnock
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      Posted by:J.L. Austin Geoffrey J. Warnock
      Published :2018-09-15T04:50:19+00:00

    1 thought on “Sense and Sensibilia: Reconstructed from the Manuscript Notes by C.J. Warnock”

    1. Having just read Ayer, I had to read the great anti-Ayer. Not quite as good, but almost as combatative, and it makes some good points. Unfortunately, it was cobbled together from the Austin's notes by someone else, so it doesn't cohere as well as it ought, and sometimes the counter-arguments seem to miss the point of the arguments.

    2. This book presents Austin's lectures on the strange idea of 'sense data' put together after his death by G.J. Warnock from Austin's notes of talks that Austin had given at Oxford and the University of California in the late nineteen forties and fifties. The book is a thorough dismantling of Ayer's The Foundations of Empirical Knowledge and, to a lesser extent, of Price's Perception and Warnock's book on Berkeley. He sets up his target as follows: "The general doctrine, generally stated, goes lik [...]

    3. I'm going to try to read this after Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception. I think they would have gotten along well.

    4. A beautifully written critique of Ayer and Price on sense-data and scepticism that taught me as much about how to write an argument clearly and persuasively as it did to teach me about the philosophy of perception and knowledge. If only Austin himself was alive long enough to write and publish this work himself.8/10

    5. After a semester reading the works of the analytic and continental philosophers was relieved to read this one. While I loved the reevaluation of our epistemological approaches by the other philosophers, I was depressed to see them explain away most of what we think we are certain of. Austin reestablishes common sense as a valid approach and finds fault with the idea that our minds are deceiving us.

    6. This book was assigned in the epistemology course I took my first semester at UC Berkeley. The author's name appeared on the cover as "J.L. Austen." I have always thought that its author and publisher hoped to sell a lot of copies to rubes who thought they were buying the popular novel Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen. Can't blame 'em for trying.

    7. While I enjoy these reconstructed lecture notes, Austin's position often wavers between forms of disjunctivism, naive/direct realism, and even accepting the existence of sense-data. However, the issues he discusses are central to theories of perception and this is, of course, a must read for anyone with an interest in metaphysics or epistemology.

    8. Austin's lectures present one of the most sophisticated analyses of what went wrong in the philosophical debate about perception and, more generally, the problems inherent in foundationalist epistemology. I will re-read this many times.

    9. i'm pretty sure that i don't agree with a damn thing he says-- not a single point of substance-- but man, is JLA fun to read. loved it.

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