Doctor Who and the Visitation

Doctor Who and the Visitation Tegan the young air hostess who quite unintentionally became a member of the TARDIS s crew wants to return to her own time but when the Doctor tries to take her back to Heathrow Airport in the twen

  • Title: Doctor Who and the Visitation
  • Author: Eric Saward
  • ISBN: 9780426201359
  • Page: 464
  • Format: Paperback
  • Tegan, the young air hostess who quite unintentionally became a member of the TARDIS s crew, wants to return to her own time, but when the Doctor tries to take her back to Heathrow Airport in the twentieth century the TARDIS lands instead on the outskirts of seventeenth century London.The Doctor and his companions receive a decidedly unfriendly welcome but it soon becomeTegan, the young air hostess who quite unintentionally became a member of the TARDIS s crew, wants to return to her own time, but when the Doctor tries to take her back to Heathrow Airport in the twentieth century the TARDIS lands instead on the outskirts of seventeenth century London.The Doctor and his companions receive a decidedly unfriendly welcome but it soon becomes clear that the sinister activities of other visitors from time and space have made the villagers extremely suspicious of outsiders.And as a result of the aliens evil schemes, the Doctor finds himself on the point of playing a key role in a gruesome historical event

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    1 thought on “Doctor Who and the Visitation”

    1. The prologue to this one is really quite good. It starts with a gentle description of a summer evening in 17th century England, with a fox witnessing the arrival of alien visitors. Yes it's all a bit clich├ęd but the tranquil poetry of the moments counterpoint the tragic brutality of what is to follow very well. Eric Saward also does a remarkably good job of creating fully realised characters in a handful of pages, making their deaths really quite sad. Unfortunately this is as good as it gets. T [...]

    2. Eric Saward's adaptation of his own fifth Doctor script is very much in the mid-level Terrance Dicks mode of transcribing the television story with little or no embellishment. In the day and age in which the Doctor Who novels were originally published, I suppose this is good enough. But thirty years out when we can easily stream the episodes of this popular story or pick it up brilliantly remastered on DVD, it only makes "The Visitation" as a novel that much more disappointing. That means headin [...]

    3. The plot is one of the standard, oft-seen ones where aliens are about to invade earth, usually picking a starting point in and around London. More than anything else, it's the characters that give this one some of its high points, from the actor-turned-drifter character who becomes the Doctor's reluctant ally to the family who are tragically wiped out early on. At this stage, the Doctor was a young-ish man surrounded by fairly capable companions (Tegan is tough, Nyssa is super brainy and Adric i [...]

    4. The Doctor tries a help the stranded Terileptil's of the planet earth only to find out they don't want to move they would rather kill everyone Earth instead. So the Doctor starts the Great Fire of London to beat them??? 6/10

    5. Virgin reprint (1992), different coverA promising start - but the end of the story dosn't really hold up. One of the more impressive visuals (that gloriously bejewelled android) doesn't get a decent description; the Terileptils don't really appear until well over halfway through. One or two oddities - if the Soliton gas is so inflammable setting the London HQ in a bakery seems daft (and how did the Terileptil culture develop a manufacturing base anyway?). I wonder how many casual readers will gr [...]

    6. I have been a fan of Doctor Who ever since I Stumbled across the fourth Doctor Tom Baker in re-runs on Ch. 9 Saturday mornings in 1980-81. It was a marvelous bit of luck to find that BBC Books put these episode Novelizations back in print this year.The Visitation features Baker's successor, Peter Davison as the Doctor and was written by the episode's original writer and later show script editor Eric Saward. This book is a ridiculously quick read ( less than 200 pages) and good fun if you are awa [...]

    7. This is a pretty straight-forward adaptation from script to novelization to audiobook. There is nothing here surprising and no big changes if one has seen the original episodes for this story-arc. If that was all that there was going for this particular audiobook I might not have even picked it up, but I was interested in seeing how Matthew Waterhouse did the reading. I enjoyed his memoir, Blue Box Boy, very much and have since watched all the episodes with Adric and enjoyed them as well. So hav [...]

    8. A decent attempt to do science fiction in a historical setting that doesn't quite work. The monsters are visually interesting and I like the highway man character that helps the Tardis crew, but the companions don't seem to do much, except Nyssa. She finally gets to do something besides get kidnapped.That and the plot that threatens the earth and history as we know it feels awfully tacked on.Kind of amusing that the solution to the alien bad guys ( I forget their names) references to an earlier [...]

    9. I have to say, these Doctor Who audiobooks are very well done! They are entertaining, well narrated, and easily conjure pictures from the TV episodes as I listen to them, even if I've not seen the entire episode (as was the case with Doctor Who and the Visitation). There were a couple of points in this audiobook that the sound effects occasionally overpowered the narrator's voice, but this was rare, and only happened in the very beginning of the book. Overall, this was a good one to listen to as [...]

    10. There were a few extra details added to flesh out the television episode a bit more. This was nice. One of my favorite episodes of all time, so was excited to see this available as an audiobook. Matthew Waterhouse does just an alright job of reading. His interpretation of the Terileptils sounds more like Zygons. And as for Richard Mace, some sort of atypical buffoon. Even though Matthew was in the episode, I wonder how well his memory served him here? Might have been prudent to view the televisi [...]

    11. nhwvejournal/1060883ml#cutid1[return][return]I may have unconsciously been avoiding this one, given how generally hostile I feel about Eric Saward's impact on the programme. But in fact it is a perfectly decent narrative; good character moments especially for Nyssa and for the actor / highwayman Richard Mace (who is consistently described as "portly" which is at variance with the TV version). Better than I had expected.

    12. Saward's novelization of his own script generally meets the requirements set by the Target novelizations. It is not too difficult, so pre-teens can read it and not get lost. It preserves most of the televised episode. It has novelistic characteristics enough so that a reader does not feel that he/she is simply reading a reformatted script. It's not too demanding and bit more of a novel than the typical Terrance Dicks novelization.

    13. Eric Saward is on record as being disappointed with this novelizationd while it's not anywhere near as ambitious as his other efforts, there's a gentleness and care with the prose that makes this a very warm and wonderful read. The first chapter is especially well written, and there's a satisfying, tangible atmosphere permeating the book. Deserving of some re-evaluation.

    14. Nyssa, Tegan, Adric and the Doctor end up in England, 1666 and prevent an alien from spreading plague. I love this batch of Companions--they interact with the easy, prickly intimacy of siblings. And some of them are actually useful in a crisis!

    15. It is wonderful to hear Matthew Waterhouse even if the story is not as strong as I expected. I would like to hear him in some of the BF Audio Dramas *hint hint*

    16. What I appreciated about this book is it flowed just like the tv show. I haven't found that with al the "Doctor Who" books I've read.

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