Peculiar Institution: America's Death Penalty in an Age of Abolition

Peculiar Institution America s Death Penalty in an Age of Abolition The U S death penalty is a peculiar institution and a uniquely American one Despite its comprehensive abolition elsewhere in the Western world capital punishment continues in dozens of American stat

  • Title: Peculiar Institution: America's Death Penalty in an Age of Abolition
  • Author: David W. Garland
  • ISBN: 9780674057234
  • Page: 491
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The U.S death penalty is a peculiar institution, and a uniquely American one Despite its comprehensive abolition elsewhere in the Western world, capital punishment continues in dozens of American states a fact that is frequently discussed but rarely understood The same puzzlement surrounds the peculiar form that American capital punishment now takes, with its uneven a The U.S death penalty is a peculiar institution, and a uniquely American one Despite its comprehensive abolition elsewhere in the Western world, capital punishment continues in dozens of American states a fact that is frequently discussed but rarely understood The same puzzlement surrounds the peculiar form that American capital punishment now takes, with its uneven application, its seemingly endless delays, and the uncertainty of its ever being carried out in individual cases, none of which seem conducive to effective crime control or criminal justice In a brilliantly provocative study, David Garland explains this tenacity and shows how death penalty practice has come to bear the distinctive hallmarks of America s political institutions and cultural conflicts America s radical federalism and local democracy, as well as its legacy of violence and racism, account for our divergence from the rest of the West Whereas the elites of other nations were able to impose nationwide abolition from above despite public objections, American elites are unable and unwilling to end a punishment that has the support of local majorities and a storied place in popular culture In the course of hundreds of decisions, federal courts sought to rationalize and civilize an institution that too often resembled a lynching, producing layers of legal process but also delays and reversals Yet the Supreme Court insists that the issue is to be decided by local political actors and public opinion So the death penalty continues to respond to popular will, enhancing the power of criminal justice professionals, providing drama for the media, and bringing pleasure to a public audience who consumes its chilling tales Garland brings a new clarity to our understanding of this peculiar institution and a new challenge to supporters and opponents alike 20101223

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      Published :2018-09-07T23:33:58+00:00

    1 thought on “Peculiar Institution: America's Death Penalty in an Age of Abolition”

    1. The American death penalty. Why does it exist? Why does it persist? How has it persisted in the face of almost ubiquitous Western-world abolition? Despite a 1970's abolition by the Supreme Court, how and why was the institution revived? What purposes does the death penalty serve and for whom?All questions raised and addressed by Garland in exploring the 'Peculiar Institution' of capital punishment.In describing the history of capital punishment worldwide, Garland shows that for the majority of h [...]

    2. A must read for students taking English Honors this year. Gives some new insight into our "peculiar institution" of the death penalty. Why do we have something that strikes criminals as often as lightning and is implemented only for its "deterrence" according to former president George W. Bush. The third chapter is dry. Skip over theory sections if they become too much. Probably the most important message about the institution is that it is odd that we persist in having an institution that made [...]

    3. IN THE 1950s AND 1960s, politicians and public officials in the United States generally did not view opposition to the death penalty as a major political liability. Indeed some of them were outspoken foes of capital punishment. To demonstrate his faith in rehabilitation, Michael Disalle, Ohio’s governor from 1959 to 1963, made it a point to hire convicted murderers to serve on his household staff.Read more

    4. Occhio per occhio, dente per dente. Hai voglia a spiegare con dettaglio maniacale e vigore accademico perché 35 stati USA su 50 mantengono la pena capitale. Qualsiasi analisi politica, istituzionale, storica, culturale arretra di fronte all'evidenza empirica: la confederazione nacque sulla violenza e ad essa si continua a ricorrere per fare giustizia. È semplicistico forse, ma almeno non ipocrita.

    5. Why is America alone among Western nations in retaining the death penalty? The answer's not as simple as you think. This book explains why in fascinating detail.

    6. A bit repetitive at points, but a thought-provoking meditation on the death penalty in the modern Western world. I ended up with 11 pages of notes--definitely a measure of a worthwhile read.

    7. A real bear of a book, dense and fairly academic, but also pretty thought-provoking. If you're interested in the topic, this is an important addition to the literature.

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